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Thread: Diapers and Anxiety/Depression?

  1. #1

    Default Diapers and Anxiety/Depression?

    (Just a quick disclaimer, I'm not sure if this belongs here or in off topic, so moderators, feel free to move it if you feel the need.)

    So this is something that I've thought about for a few years now, based on my own experience. Basically, I've struggled with Generalized Anxiety Disorder and depression throughout my life, the both of them going hand and hand. It's been especially bad the last couple years, a huge part of it being a year and a half ago when a friend took me to the hospital because I confessed to them that I was considering suicide.

    Now here's where my DL side comes into play. Whenever things got hairy way back when, going in my room and wearing diapers often helped with coping, as many have said here before. Now it wasn't my only coping mechanism, as I had a lot of supportive friends and family. However, as it got more and more closer to the breaking point, I withdrew from both my DL side and interacting with others, and telling them how I actually felt.

    Fast forward to the present. I've moved out on my own, 1500 miles away to college from home. Now obviously I've been able to wear diapers WAY more, and it's been very helpful with dealing with the anxiety that's come from living on my own, as well as making my plans for the near future.

    What I wanna ask you guys (especially those who've struggled with this sort of thing), have diapers been a good way to cope? Do you think there's any sort of draw back to it? What do you think?

  2. #2

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    I think they can be a good way to deal with anxiety/depression... The only downsides are the anxiety of potentially getting "caught" (which may or may not be either a real or imagined issue) and the fact that it can make me withdraw so I can have time alone (which means I can miss out on socialising and feel even more isolated and depressed)... and maybe self-acceptance, to a degree.

    I think that, in an ideal world where you don't have any worry about someone finding out, accept yourself fully, and can manage to wear whilst still being social (either restricting yourself to certain times, or wearing around people who accept it), diapers wouldn't be a problem at all.

    But, if they're a coping mechanism (which they are for me), going through a phase of really wanting to wear can be an indication that you're under a lot of stress and might want to try and get some kind of help for that, if you don't already have something in place.


  3. #3

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    In the past I think I've suffered from depression (I did not tell anyone or attempt to get diagnosed). For a few weeks during my junior year of high school I had pretty consistent thoughts of suicide. I think my depression was more due to cognition (having a poor way of mentally framing the stressors in my life) than it was to genetic predisposition or chemical imbalance because after I found another way of thinking, the thoughts of suicide went away and haven't recurred in years.

    I don't think that they really are a coping mechanism for me. I wear diapers because I enjoy it. I don't really use them to respond to stress because I personally really need to work through my stress cognitively. I need to convince myself that my stress is less grave than it seems. I have trouble distracting myself from stress, and I can't really get absorbed in another activity while I'm worried about one deadline, for instance.

    Regardless, if diapers work for you, I don't see much of a problem with using them as a coping mechanism. I think they fit the bill as long as they are not your only way of handling stress, since they won't make the stressor go away (but this is true of any coping mechanism). I also think that if you are an ABDL, then complete suppression or self-denial can be a stressor in itself, so diapers can be a reasonable way to keep that in check. Perhaps they could be somewhat problematic in that they are expensive, so they may not help as much with someone with, say, financial concerns. But that is a specific case.

  4. #4

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    I have horrible anxiety, which flares up every couple of days, and I go in and out of depression. I've never been seriously suicidal, but I can get into a gloom where I cant sleep but when I do, I can't get up. Motivation to do anything is completely absent and I have a complete communication break down with everyone around me. With my anxiety, its like suddenly I go into a Nightmare during the day time.. But I won't go too much in depth with that. The only noteworthy detail is that I don't treat either of these with medications and I don't talk to my doctor/or to a therapist about them. I try my hardest to naturally cope with them, which is not to say I disagree when people seek help, its more to say mine must not be that serious. I highly recommend talking to someone about these issues if they are serious. Mine seem to be 100% stress related.

    I've often noticed that when wearing diapers, which is very often, I have little to no issues with my anxiety or depression. All of my symptoms are during the times when I'm not wearing. This is a good thing and a bad thing, the good being that I know one way to keep the demons away, the bad is that diapers may have turned into a sort of addiction where if i am without them, my body panics and it results in anxiety and depression. It's a bit of a chicken or the egg situation, because who knows if the symptoms are from a withdraw from diapers or would be there in the first place. But none of these issues have been serious enough that I've really had to figure them out.

    Either way, diapers make me happy so I wear them to what I consider to be a healthy amount for my personal needs. If they work the same for you, wear them.

  5. #5

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    For me it can be a two edged sword. Not only do I feel better when I'm wearing diapers, but I'm also more likely to feel depressed when I'm not wearing diapers, or more so, can't wear diapers because of social commitments

    Wearing diapers keeps me in a certain mindset, and in that regard, keeps my mind busy in one direction, that of regression. Normally, if I keep busy, I'm not depressed. It's when I have some free time on my hands that I'm likely to feel depressed. Saturdays can be like that since it's my day off. If I'm wearing diapers, I'm almost always happy, and my disposition is far more gentle and kind.

  6. #6

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    I am no psychologist, but if I could beg you to consider my view for a moment I would be grateful! This turned into a bit of a mini-essay! Sorry >.<

    I do wonder how much of what you experience is actual depression vs. dealing with hormones and the trials and tribulations of growing up? Please don't misjudge. It's not that I don't believe you - not at all. You've come here for support after all and I do believe you've got serious issues and problems you need to deal with. It's more that I struggle to see how such an eloquent and rational chap, who's about to go to college and live on his own, becomes as mentally ill as your doctors say you are. Again, I am not trying to contradict what your doctor's telling you or what you believe yourself. More, trying to get you to think about it from a slightly different angle, and let me personally understand it.

    From the way that you type and construct your posts, you seem like a pretty together person. Doctors are sometimes known for being trigger happy when diagnosing a patient - especially mental illnesses (from a psychological perspective some of it is honestly guess work). It's pretty darn rare to suffer depression from when you're a real young-en. And, if you have been diagnosed very early (which from the sounds of things you have), growing up knowing that you're mentally ill must have its own affects? Personally, I've found that self-fulfilling prophecies can be pretty dangerous in themselves.

    Perhaps you could consider for a moment how I see things? From my perspective, trying to commit suicide once or twice during your teen years is normal-ish behaviour (sister's attempted four times - I did once). Also experiencing ridiculously low points when you're a teen is again something I would consider normal. One could almost call it the come-down from childhood (life ain't peachy all the time no more! >.<). Continuing to struggle with anxiety, depression and stress - I consider this apart of being an adult.

    On the other hand, I have suffered both anxiety and depression more than I probably should have. In fact, they are both a constant battle to this day. So I know what's it's like. It's not particularly pleasant and it does at times feel like it's slowly eating away at your character and personality as well as your energy! I have found that as we get older, we are bombarded with more and more stress and more and more shit to deal with. I've long since accepted this as the norm - to hope for endless happiness is to be perpetually disappointed. I've been so anxious at times I've felt like my heart was ready to explode, and I suffered depression for over two years - two of the worst years of my life.

    What I've found what brings me out of it, and what continues to keep me out of it, is grounding myself to a happy place. By this I mean, actively working to get your head above the clouds at least once in a blue moon, just so you can remind yourself what it's like to feel normal. Also I mean, finding something that de-stresses you by exercising your mind and your body, and releases natural happy drugs such as endorphins. Diapers can definitely be one of these things. I've found though that it helps to keep variation in activities, so you don't get bored! It's much like eating cake. Too much cake at once and you feel sick. A piece of cake once a week however is a lovely and tasty treat :3.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Luca View Post
    I do wonder how much of what you experience is actual depression vs. dealing with hormones and the trials and tribulations of growing up? Please don't misjudge. It's not that I don't believe you - not at all. You've come here for support after all and I do believe you've got serious issues and problems you need to deal with. It's more that I struggle to see how such an eloquent and rational chap, who's about to go to college and live on his own, becomes as mentally ill as your doctors say you are. Again, I am not trying to contradict what your doctor's telling you or what you believe yourself. More, trying to get you to think about it from a slightly different angle, and let me personally understand it.

    From the way that you type and construct your posts, you seem like a pretty together person. Doctors are sometimes known for being trigger happy when diagnosing a patient - especially mental illnesses (from a psychological perspective some of it is honestly guess work). It's pretty darn rare to suffer depression from when you're a real young-en. And, if you have been diagnosed very early (which from the sounds of things you have), growing up knowing that you're mentally ill must have its own affects? Personally, I've found that self-fulfilling prophecies can be pretty dangerous in themselves.
    I really take issue with that. I was always top of the class at school, consider myself reasonably intelligent, and went to the second best university in the country (for the subject I was studying). I consider myself rational and, at least, sufficiently eloquent to express myself. I have also suffered with extreme anxiety for as long as I can remember (probably started around age 5). When I was 17 I became increasingly anxious and depressed, seriously tried to kill myself in my 20s (good thing I was so messed up and so averse to pain that I didn't manage it), and have been seriously depressed and anxious ever since. I feel like I have literally nothing to live for, that life only makes me miserable, and all I have to look forward to is succumbing to a serious illness like cancer, being forced to endure torturous and agonising hospital treatment before death comes as a welcome release.

    Now, if you saw me, you'd say that I lack confidence but otherwise seem to be normal. And that's part of the problem. I have spent my life thinking my pervasively terrified mental state is normal and that everyone hides who they are. Only people who know me well get so glimpse through the chinks in my armour. It's difficult to get any effective treatment because my depression and anxiety are so severe and I have many co-morbid conditions. And because I am so good at hiding them. I know what people expect to hear and I'm not very good at understanding my emotions, so I block them out and (in order to appear "normal") have become adept at giving people the answers they expect. I am very "socially acceptable"... but it's an illusion I create.

    Neither intelligence, rationality, eloquence nor age preclude anyone from developing mental illness. In fact, I've seen a few reports that indicate that people with higher IQs are more at risk of developing mental health problems.

    I'm sure you didn't mean it that way, but it sounds like you're saying that only stupid people, the illiterate or the elderly could suffer from mental health issues... That really isn't the case.

    (And I'm really sorry if this sounds harsh -- it wasn't meant to, honestly! )


  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    Neither intelligence, rationality, eloquence nor age preclude anyone from developing mental illness. In fact, I've seen a few reports that indicate that people with higher IQs are more at risk of developing mental health problems.

    I'm sure you didn't mean it that way, but it sounds like you're saying that only stupid people, the illiterate or the elderly could suffer from mental health issues... That really isn't the case.

    (And I'm really sorry if this sounds harsh -- it wasn't meant to, honestly! )

    "Genius and madness are two sides of the same coin". But i need to correct you a little bit, sorry!
    Based on a higher (emotional) intelligence, you're rather developing anxiety and depression problems. Not "every" mental illness in general.
    Mostly it's based on the problem that you're perceiving everything around you more accurate, where other people can shut they're eyes and mind, figuratively speaking and rather simply put.
    As a side note, it's different from autism with the typical "too much information input".
    You're processing the information, hence the higher IQ, and this can lead to such mental health problems, but not to psychotic illness or something similar!

    I don't think, that he want to put it the way, you thought, but it's still good that you addressed this subject.
    by the way


    Eh... ontopic, since we're kinda offtopic. Yes and no, i guess you're thinking about diapers by themselfes alone, since you're a "pure" DL. In this case no, not for me. They're anyway only something i need, a tool.
    But the regressing, i.e. AB/LG party from me, is a kind of coping mechanism for me. I think it's a good way to deal with anxiety or any other stressful situation afterwards. However diapers are involved in this case too, but i need to be in the little girl role to enjoy them actually.

    I don't think there is much of a drawback, so why shouldn't you enjoy them, if they also help you!

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiny
    I really take issue with that. I was always top of the class at school, consider myself reasonably intelligent, and went to the second best university in the country (for the subject I was studying). I consider myself rational and, at least, sufficiently eloquent to express myself. I have also suffered with extreme anxiety for as long as I can remember (probably started around age 5). When I was 17 I became increasingly anxious and depressed, seriously tried to kill myself in my 20s (good thing I was so messed up and so averse to pain that I didn't manage it), and have been seriously depressed and anxious ever since. I feel like I have literally nothing to live for, that life only makes me miserable, and all I have to look forward to is succumbing to a serious illness like cancer, being forced to endure torturous and agonising hospital treatment before death comes as a welcome release.
    I think what I was trying to get at was the tendency to diagnose at such a young age is more prevalent in some countries than others. And, diagnosing (and thereby confirming within someones own mind a definite mental state) can end up being the cause rather than a solution at later stages of life, because its something you've grown up with. It's almost like a fixed fact in your existence. It's a touchy subject, and I am sorry if I struck a nerve.

    I've just seen so many examples of bad parents + mental health institutions = one fucked up adult. My aunt and cousin live in CA. One of my elder cousins friends is TG and going through the typical teenage issues, plus the trauma of transition. Her parents are absolutely insisting on drugging her up to her eyeballs. Shes having a typical teenage rebellion phase and yet they insist that shes mentally ill. She's not. She just needs attention and patience. My aunt found her living on the street after being disowned by her parents.

    There are always going to be kids with serious mental health issues. That's not in debate. But you have to admit, sometimes parents are better off gently poking their kids in the right direction, rather than diagnosing them with mental health issues so early on? It's almost like creating a self-fulfilling prophecy before they're old enough to know what that is.

    I apologise if I came off a little preachy! And no, you weren't overly harsh. I can see your point of view, and I agree with it. But from a much broader perspective hopefully you can see the merits in my response.

    *hugs*

  10. #10

    Smile



    Quote Originally Posted by daLira View Post
    "Genius and madness are two sides of the same coin". But i need to correct you a little bit, sorry!
    Based on a higher (emotional) intelligence, you're rather developing anxiety and depression problems. Not "every" mental illness in general.
    Oh, I didn't mean to suggest that I was developing every mental illness! I was just saying that I'd read that mental illness (in general) is higher in people with higher IQs versus people with average IQs. I'm not sure how reliable that information is as I can't remember the source...

    Just because someone seems to be intelligent and capable, it doesn't mean that they couldn't possibly have some kind of mental health issue... That's all I was saying.

    I think a lot of the reason I get so anxious is due to the way I was brought up. My parents were fantastic, caring people and I loved them more than anything in the world. But my god were they anxious! As kids, you pick up on that and assume that the world must be a terrifying place to justify such anxiety.

    They were always worried about being "shown up" by us misbehaving, so we were expected to be very formal and always consider what every person around us was thinking... which kinda drives you completely insane after a while.

    That insecurity, lack of confidence and high anxiety that resulted meant that, over time, I withdrew, left myself open to exploitation, etc., and experienced a number of traumatic incidents. Each one only makes the position worse: I was right to be anxious, the world *is* a terrifying place, there is always someone looking to take advantage of you, you can never be safe, etc.

    But maybe a higher intelligence means that you have more "brainpower" to worry with.

    And (just for the record!) I'm NOT saying that I have a particularly high IQ, just that I'm not stupid!

    It touched a bit of a raw nerve because (for a short controlled period, such as a social event), I can completely hide my depression and anxiety and "put on an act". I'm very good at it. And because of that, I get sick of people saying things like, "You're fine. All you need is a bit more confidence," or, "You could drive if you really wanted," as if I'm just being awkward. Only people who know me well can see through the cracks in my armour.



    Quote Originally Posted by daLira View Post
    Mostly it's based on the problem that you're perceiving everything around you more accurate, where other people can shut they're eyes and mind, figuratively speaking and rather simply put.
    As a side note, it's different from autism with the typical "too much information input".
    But... what's the difference between "perceiving everything around you more accurately" (with anxiety) and "too much information input" (with autism). They sound like the same thing to me. And don't people with autism often have very high anxiety?



    Quote Originally Posted by daLira View Post
    You're processing the information, hence the higher IQ, and this can lead to such mental health problems, but not to psychotic illness or something similar!
    The article I saw/read seemed to be saying that people with a higher intelligence are more likely to develop depression and anxiety as a result of "thinking too much". But it also said something about intelligence being related to brain complexity, and, as something becomes more complex, there is more that can go wrong so the brain becomes more sensitive to smaller abnormalities. Or something like that. I don't know for sure if it's true.

    And if someone is genetically susceptible to serious psychiatric illness, then... couldn't anxiety or depression trigger it? Don't some people first experience a schizophrenic episode (for example) after a particularly intense depressive/emotional event? I'm not sure -- I don't know much about psychology. But if that's true, and higher IQs are correlated to depression and anxiety, then it must also be true that higher IQs are correlated to "more serious" psychiatric illnesses.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Quote Originally Posted by Luca View Post
    I think what I was trying to get at was the tendency to diagnose at such a young age is more prevalent in some countries than others. And, diagnosing (and thereby confirming within someones own mind a definite mental state) can end up being the cause rather than a solution at later stages of life, because its something you've grown up with. It's almost like a fixed fact in your existence. It's a touchy subject, and I am sorry if I struck a nerve.

    I've just seen so many examples of bad parents + mental health institutions = one fucked up adult. My aunt and cousin live in CA. One of my elder cousins friends is TG and going through the typical teenage issues, plus the trauma of transition. Her parents are absolutely insisting on drugging her up to her eyeballs. Shes having a typical teenage rebellion phase and yet they insist that shes mentally ill. She's not. She just needs attention and patience. My aunt found her living on the street after being disowned by her parents.

    There are always going to be kids with serious mental health issues. That's not in debate. But you have to admit, sometimes parents are better off gently poking their kids in the right direction, rather than diagnosing them with mental health issues so early on? It's almost like creating a self-fulfilling prophecy before they're old enough to know what that is.
    I pretty much agree with all of that. I've heard that in the US there's a tendency to accept the DSM as gospel and hand out diagnostic labels like cub-scout badges (although I wouldn't know, being a Brit).

    But I think that kind of labelling doesn't help the individual overcome that "identity" (a self-fulfilling prophesy, as you say) or help doctors/therapists treat the unique nature of every individual's problems because they've already been pigeon-holed and categorised. It easier to look at a person and see a label without really looking at the source of the problem.

    Funnily enough, I've just finished reading "The Psychopath Test: A Journey Through the Madness Industry" by Jon Ronson about how arbitrary the diagnosis criteria are. It was an easy & entertaining read.



    Quote Originally Posted by Luca View Post
    I apologise if I came off a little preachy! And no, you weren't overly harsh. I can see your point of view, and I agree with it. But from a much broader perspective hopefully you can see the merits in my response.

    *hugs*
    Hey, no worries, Luca! I also see your point of view and agree with it! Phew! Yeah... I understand what you were saying now.



    (Oh, crumbs! Sorry for the wall of text... )

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