Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: Safe holiday tips

  1. #1

    Default Safe holiday tips

    I compiled a list of helpful tips this holiday season to help everyone stay safe and have a wonderful gift giving season. I quoted the websites I gathered the info from. I hope this helps alot of people.




    Trip Troubles: Before visiting relatives, evade overly enticing travel deals. Watch out for unexpected hotel and flight "confirmation" or "cancellation" notices—which trick consumers into clicking unsafe links to "stop" unreal reservations.

    Getaway Goons:When shopping or vacationing, don't become a target for theft. Guard belongings, be observant and pack lightly. Avoid broadcasting travel plans or empty homes on social networks—as it may entice burglars.

    Cheating Charities: Be skeptical of seasonal charitable solicitors who use high pressure tactics, won't answer basic donation questions or can't provide proof of charity affiliation. Don't trust solicitations with invoices for past due payments.

    Good-For-Nothing Gift Cards: Avoid purchasing from disreputable third parties and examine gift cards closely for terms, restrictions, fees and expiration dates. Use cards early as they may become non-redeemable if retailers go out of business.

    Gotta-Have Goodies and Gadgets: Dodge deceptive deals and "free" offers on desirable toys, jewelry and electronics in audacious auctions, classified ad sites, social media posts, pop-up ads, online coupons, sweepstakes and surveys.

    Cruel Credit Catches:During the big spending season, discard ads and offers for high-interest credit cards, costly layaway programs and payday loan traps.

    Jester Jobs: Laugh off limited-time job offers for high-paying mystery shopping gigs and online work-at-home tasks. "Employers" may steal data from applications, fail to send start-up materials or induce paycheck money transfer schemes.

    Suspicious Santa Sites:Steer away if "Santa" requests unnecessary personal data, doesn't abide by advertising laws or fails to disclose contact details and privacy policies.

    Dodgy Domains: Dangers may be hiding in holiday-themed articles, music, screensavers and other downloads. Before surfing the Web, social media sites or emails, update anti-virus protection and check firewalls. Avoid shopping or banking online on unsecured Wi-Fi networks at public places, like airports and hotels.

    Hacking Holiday E-Cards: Do not click links or attachments in e-cards and other holiday greetings from unfamiliar senders. Ensure spam filters are set.

    Bogus Bank Emails: Disregard sudden emails or text messages about bank account issues. Instead, contact banks or financial institutions directly to verify.

    Deceiving Deliveries: Don't accept notices about delivery delays or confirmations on unordered packages; phishers and smishers often pose as well-known retailers or shipping companies to gain false credibility.


    Here are some helpful tips from BBB regarding gift card purchases:

    Buy from sources you know and trust. Avoid buying gift cards from online auction sites, because the cards may be counterfeit or may have been obtained fraudulently.

    Read the fine print before you buy. Is there a fee to buy the card? If you buy a card by phone or online, are there shipping and handling fees? If you don't like the terms and conditions, buy elsewhere.

    See whether any fees will be deducted from the card after you purchase it.

    Inspect the card before you buy it. Verify that none of the protective stickers have been removed. Make sure that the codes on the back of the card haven't been scratched off to reveal a PIN number. Report any damaged cards to the store selling the cards.

    Give the recipient your original receipt so they can verify the card's purchase in case it is lost or stolen.

    Consider the financial condition of the retailer or restaurant.


    DON’T succumb to high-pressure, emotional pitches. Giving on the spot is never necessary, no matter how hard a telemarketer or door-to-door solicitor pushes it. The charity that needs your money today will welcome it just as much tomorrow…after you’ve had time to do your homework.

    DO check out the charity carefully. Make sure you feel comfortable with how your money will be spent. Don’t just take the word of someone else; even good friends may not have fully researched the charities they endorse. Go to For Charities and Donors - U.S. BBB to verify that a charity meets BBB Wise Giving Alliance’s 20 Standards for Charity Accountability.

    DON’T assume that only “low overhead” matters. How much money a charity spends on the actual cause – as compared to how much goes toward fundraising and administration – is an important factor, but it’s not the whole story. A charity with impressive financial ratios could have other significant problems such as insufficient transparency, inadequate board activity and inaccurate appeals.

    DO be sure it’s the right charity. With so many charities in existence, their names can blur in a donor’s mind and similar-sounding organizations are common. Many phony charities purposefully choose a name that sounds familiar. Be sure you know which charity you’re supporting and that it’s not a case of mistaken identity.

    DON’T assume that the charity wants any item you donate. Worn out, unusable or unwanted donated goods cost charities millions of dollars each year because the organization has to bear the cost of tossing the unacceptable donation. If you have questions about an item’s acceptability, call the charity and ask.

    DO consider easy text-to-give options. The BBB Mobile Giving Foundation makes it easy to give smaller donations (usually $10) to charities they have selected and monitor, including those providing relief to victims of Hurricane Sandy. Go to Mobile Giving to find out more.


    Tracking Numbers. Ask whomever is sending your pacakge to provide you with a tracking number, most online services have to provide you one by law.

    Signature Required. Same as above, ask to have your package sent with a signature required. Most online business WONT do this so you have to call the buisness or email and ask their customer service to request a signature required upon delivery.

    Post a note for the carrier service with instructions. Put a note on your front door with instructions to the carrier service your using if your not home so they can hide it where you know where the item may be.

    Deliver to a trusted neighbor. If you know you wont be home and have a neighbor at home consider having them sign for it or getting it sent to their house after requesting permission to do so with their knowledge.

    Ask a neighbor to look out for delievery trucks. Ask your neighbor to look out for you in case your home and dont see it or are not around generally they will look out for you.

    Install a camera on your front porch. Install a camera on your front porch if you have ongoing theft of pacakages, This way you have some hard evidence against criminals who might steal your packages from you


    Create a car safety kit. Holiday driving often includes the threat of dangerous winter weather. Snow and ice lead to accidents, car troubles, long delays and road closures. You can prepare for bad weather by creating your own safety kit. Basics for the kit include blankets, flashlight with extra batteries, radio, first aid kit, jumper cables, non-perishable foods like granola bars and nuts, bottled water, an ice scraper and warm gloves.

    Take the car in for a checkup. Breaking down on the side of the road can definitely put a damper on the holiday spirit. If your car is due for a check up, take it in before making that long haul. At the very least, check the car’s fluid levels, wipers and tire pressure. Check the condition of your tires and, if you plan on driving through serious winter weather, consider getting snow tires.

    Drop the distractions – According to the National Safety Council, 28 percent of accidents happen when people are talking on their cell phone or sending text messages. When you’re behind the wheel, don’t text and drive, use a hands free headset when talking on the phone and get someone else to fumble with the GPS.

    Map out your route ahead of time. Make sure you know where you are going and when and where your going to stop ahead of time. Use GPS if applicable. If you need to stop and ask for directions park in well lighted areas and ask at gas stations or someplace safe not random people walking down the road.

    Lock your car. Car thiefs are on the rise during the holidays, lock your car to prevent valueable items from being stolen

    Have a communication plan. It is easy during the holidays to get seperated from your kids in busy malls and stores. Make sure you have a plan for getting in touch if this happens with a cell phone or other means. Teach your children to go to trusted people like security guards, police officers and customer service desks to look for help.


    Protect your computer – A computer should always have the most recent updates installed for spam filters, anti-virus and anti-spyware software and a secure firewall.

    Shop on trustworthy websites – Shoppers should start with BBB to check on the seller’s reputation and record for customer satisfaction. Always look for the BBB seal and other widely-recognized “trustmarks” on retailer websites and click on the seals to confirm that they are valid.

    Protect your personal information – BBB recommends taking the time to read the site’s privacy policy and understand what personal information is being requested and how it will be used. If there isn’t one posted, it should be taken as a red flag that personal information may be sold to others without permission.

    Beware of deals that sound too good to be true – Offers on websites and in unsolicited e-mails can often sound too good to be true, especially extremely low prices on hard-to-get items. Consumers should always go with their instincts and not be afraid to pass up a “deal” that might cost them dearly in the end.

    Beware of phishing – Legitimate businesses do not send e-mails claiming problems with an order or an account to lure the “buyer” into revealing financial information. If a consumer receives such an e-mail, BBB recommends picking up the phone and calling the contact number on the website where the purchase was made to confirm that there really is a problem with the transaction.

    Confirm your online purchase is secure – Shoppers should always look in the address box for the “s” in https:// and in the lower-right corner for the “lock” symbol before paying. If there are any doubts about a site, BBB recommends right-clicking anywhere on the page and select “Properties.” This will let you see the real URL (website address) and the dialog box will reveal if the site is not encrypted.

    Pay with a credit card – It’s best to use a credit card, because under federal law, the shopper can dispute the charges if he or she doesn’t receive the item. Shoppers also have dispute rights if there are unauthorized charges on their credit card, and many card issuers have “zero liability” policies under which the card holder pays nothing if someone steals the credit card number and uses it. If you are going to shop on classifieds web sites like Craigslist, never wire money and only buy locally.

    Keep documentation of your order - After completing the online order process, there may be a final confirmation page or the shopper might receive confirmation by e-mail – BBB recommends saving a copy of the Web page and any e-mails for future reference and as a record of the purchase.

    Check your credit card statements often – Don’t wait for paper statements; BBB recommends consumers check their credit card statements for suspicious activity by either calling credit card companies or by checking statements online regularly.

    Know your rights – Federal law requires that orders made by mail, phone or online be shipped by the date promised or, if no delivery time was stated, within 30 days. If the goods aren’t shipped on time, the shopper can cancel and demand a refund. There is no general three-day cancellation right, but consumers do have the right to reject merchandise if it’s defective or was misrepresented. Otherwise, it’s the company’s policies that determine if the shopper can cancel the purchase and receive a refund or credit.


    Step One: Consider your Income.
    The first step is to measure how much money is coming in. Add up your monthly salary along with your spouse’s and any child support payments, dividends or interest payments and other sources of income.

    Step Two: Add up regular monthly expenses.
    Adding up expenses is usually harder than determining your income because there are so many more factors to consider. Start with your rent or mortgage, utilities and credit card payments. Also factor in other expenses for gas and car maintenance, healthcare and groceries. A full list of monthly expenses to consider is available at Tips on How to Develop a Working Budget - BBB News Center

    Step Three: Estimate Extra Holiday ExpensesA lot of little purchases have a way of adding up over the holidays and it’s important to consider all of the expenses of the season including:

    Gifts - Make an itemized list of everyone you want to buy presents for and estimate how much you’re willing to spend for each. This includes presents for family, friends and coworkers. Also consider the cost for holiday cards and postage.

    Entertaining - Entertaining is big over the holidays. Think about who you’ll be having over and also budget for any food or beverages you might need to bring to someone else’s party. Also consider the costs for eating out and going to the movies—both popular expenses over the holidays.

    Decorations - Take stock of what you already own and then consider any additional spending you might need to make for a tree, lights, ornaments, wrapping paper, etc.

    Travel - If you’re heading out of town for the holidays, consider the cost of travel including any car maintenance or pet boarding if applicable.

    Charitable Donations - The holidays are a time of giving, so budget in how much you plan on donating to a worthy cause. You can learn more about being a savvy donor from the BBB Wise Giving Alliance.

    Step Four: Revisit, evaluate and revise your budget along the way.
    Once you’ve added up your income and your expenses, it’s time to compare. If more is going out than coming in, it’s time to go back over your budget and pare down expenses. Consider giving fewer gifts or less expensive ways of entertaining. Last year’s decorations are also probably just fine.

    Once you’ve balanced your budget, revisit it frequently over the holidays to make sure you’re sticking to it. You might find that you over estimated in some categories and underestimated in others.

    Step Five: Reward yourself. Work into your budget a small reward that you can earn if you meet your goals.
    If you don’t meet your goals, you can guess where that money is going instead: Paying off your credit card bill in January.


    O Christmas Tree Securely anchor your Christmas tree so it doesn't tip and fall, causing possible injury to your pet. This will also prevent the tree water—which may contain fertilizers that can cause stomach upset—from spilling. Stagnant tree water is a breeding ground for bacteria and your pet could end up with nausea or diarrhea should he imbibe.

    Tinsel-less Town
    Kitties love this sparkly, light-catching "toy" that's easy to bat around and carry in their mouths. But a nibble can lead to a swallow, which can lead to an obstructed digestive tract, severe vomiting, dehydration and possible surgery. It's best to brighten your boughs with something other than tinsel.

    No Feasting for the Furries
    By now you know not to feed your pets chocolate and anything sweetened with xylitol, but do you know the lengths to which an enterprising fur kid will go to chomp on something yummy? Make sure to keep your pets away from the table and unattended plates of food, and be sure to secure the lids on garbage cans.

    Toy Joy
    Looking to stuff your pet's stockings? Choose gifts that are safe.

    • Dogs have been known to tear their toys apart and swallowing the pieces, which can then become lodged in the esophagus, stomach or intestines. Stick with chew toys that are basically indestructible, Kongs that can be stuffed with healthy foods or chew treats that are designed to be safely digestible.

    • Long, stringy things are a feline's dream, but the most risky toys for cats involve ribbon, yarn and loose little parts that can get stuck in the intestines, often necessitating surgery. Surprise kitty with a new ball that's too big to swallow, a stuffed catnip toy or the interactive cat dancer—and tons of play sessions together.

    Forget the Mistletoe & Holly
    Holly, when ingested, can cause pets to suffer nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Mistletoe can cause gastrointestinal upset and cardiovascular problems. And many varieties of lilies, can cause kidney failure in cats if ingested. Opt for just-as-jolly artificial plants made from silk or plastic, or choose a pet-safe bouquet.

    Leave the Leftovers
    Fatty, spicy and no-no human foods, as well as bones, should not be fed to your furry friends. Pets can join the festivities in other fun ways that won't lead to costly medical bills.

    That Holiday Glow
    Don't leave lighted candles unattended. Pets may burn themselves or cause a fire if they knock candles over. Be sure to use appropriate candle holders, placed on a stable surface. And if you leave the room, put the candle out!

    Wired Up
    Keep wires, batteries and glass or plastic ornaments out of paws' reach. A wire can deliver a potentially lethal electrical shock and a punctured battery can cause burns to the mouth and esophagus, while shards of breakable ornaments can damage your pet's mouth.

    House Rules
    If your animal-loving guests would like to give your pets a little extra attention and exercise while you're busy tending to the party, ask them to feel free to start a nice play or petting session.

    Put the Meds Away
    Make sure all of your medications are locked behind secure doors, and be sure to tell your guests to keep their meds zipped up and packed away, too.

    Careful with Cocktails
    If your celebration includes adult holiday beverages, be sure to place your unattended alcoholic drinks where pets cannot get to them. If ingested, your pet could become weak, ill and may even go into a coma, possibly resulting in death from respiratory failure.

    A Room of Their Own
    Give your pet his own quiet space to retreat to—complete with fresh water and a place to snuggle. Shy pups and cats might want to hide out under a piece of furniture, in their carrying case or in a separate room away from the hubbub.

    New Year's Noise
    As you count down to the new year, please keep in mind that strings of thrown confetti can get lodged in a cat's intestines, if ingested, perhaps necessitating surgery. Noisy poppers can terrify pets and cause possible damage to sensitive ears.



    When purchasing an artificial tree, look for the label "Fire Resistant."

    When purchasing a live tree, check for freshness. A fresh tree is green, needles are hard to pull from branches and when bent between your fingers, needles do not break. The trunk butt of a fresh tree is sticky with resin, and when tapped on the ground, the tree should not lose many needles.

    When setting up a tree at home, place it away from fireplaces, radiators or portable heaters. Place the tree out of the way of traffic and do not block doorways.

    Cut a few inches off the trunk of your tree to expose the fresh wood. This allows for better water absorption and will help keep your tree from drying out and becoming a fire hazard.

    Be sure to keep the stand filled with water, because heated rooms can dry live trees out rapidly.

    Check all tree lights-even if you've just purchased them-before hanging them on your tree. Make sure all the bulbs work and that there are no frayed wires, broken sockets or loose connections.

    Never use electric lights on a metallic tree. The tree can become charged with electricity from faulty lights, and a person touching a branch could be electrocuted.

    Before using lights outdoors, check labels to be sure they have been certified for outdoor use. To hold lights in place, string them through hooks or insulated staples, not nails or tacks. Never pull or tug lights to remove them.

    Plug all outdoor electric decorations into circuits with ground fault circuit interrupters to avoid potential shocks.

    Turn off all lights when you go to bed or leave the house. The lights could short out and start a fire.


    Use only non-combustible or flame-resistant materials to trim a tree. Choose tinsel or artificial icicles of plastic or nonleaded metals.

    Never use lighted candles on a tree or near other evergreens. Always use non-flammable holders, and place candles where they will not be knocked over.

    In homes with small children, take special care to avoid decorations that are sharp or breakable. Keep trimmings with small removable parts out of the reach of children to prevent them from swallowing or inhaling small pieces. Avoid trimmings that resemble candy or food that may tempt a young child to eat them.

    Wear gloves to avoid eye and skin irritation while decorating with spun glass "angel hair." Follow container directions carefully to avoid lung irritation while decorating with artificial snow sprays.

    Remove all wrapping papers, bags, paper, ribbons and bows from tree and fireplace areas after gifts are opened. These items can pose suffocation and choking hazards to a small child or can cause a fire if near flame.

    Toy Safety

    Select toys to suit the age, abilities, skills and interest level of the intended child. Toys too advanced may pose safety hazards for younger children.

    Before buying a toy or allowing your child to play with a toy that he has received as a gift, read the instructions carefully.

    To prevent both burns and electrical shocks, don’t give young children (under age 10) a toy that must be plugged into an electrical outlet. Instead, buy toys that are battery-operated.

    Young children can choke on small parts contained in toys or games. Government regulations specify that toys for children under age three cannot have parts less than 1 1/4 inches in diameter and 2 1/4 inches long.

    Children can have serious stomach and intestinal problems – including death -- after swallowing button batteries and magnets. In addition to toys, button batteries are often found in musical greeting cards, remote controls, hearing aids and other small electronics. Keep them away from young children and call your health care provider immediately if your child swallows one.

    Children can choke or suffocate on uninflated or broken balloons; do not allow children under age 8 to play with them.

    Remove strings and ribbons from toys before giving them to young children.

    Watch for pull toys with strings that are more than 12 inches in length. They could be a strangulation hazard for babies.

    Parents should store toys in a designated location, such as on a shelf or in a toy chest, and keep older kids’ toys away from young children.

    Food Safety
    Bacteria are often present in raw foods. Fully cook meats and poultry, and thoroughly wash raw vegetables and fruits.

    Be sure to keep hot liquids and foods away from the edges of counters and tables, where they can be easily knocked over by a young child’s exploring hands. Be sure that young children cannot access microwave ovens.

    Wash your hands frequently, and make sure your children do the same.

    Never put a spoon used to taste food back into food without washing it.

    Always keep raw foods and cooked foods separately, and use separate utensils when preparing them.

    Always thaw meat in the refrigerator, never on the countertop.

    Foods that require refrigeration should never be left at room temperature for more than two hours.

    Happy Visiting
    Clean up immediately after a holiday party. A toddler could rise early and choke on leftover food or come in contact with alcohol or tobacco.

    Remember that the homes you visit may not be childproofed. Keep an eye out for danger spots like unlocked cabinets, unattended purses, accessible cleaning or laundry products, stairways, or hot radiators.

    Keep a list with all of the important phone numbers you or a baby-sitter are likely to need in case of an emergency. Include the police and fire department, your pediatrician and the national Poison Help Line, 1-800-222-1222. Laminating the list will prevent it from being torn or damaged by accidental spills.

    Traveling, visiting family members, getting presents, shopping, etc., can all increase your child's stress levels. Trying to stick to your child's usual routines, including sleep schedules and timing of naps, can help you and your child enjoy the holidays and reduce stress.

    Before lighting any fire, remove all greens, boughs, papers, and other decorations from fireplace area. Check to see that the flue is open.

    Use care with "fire salts," which produce colored flames when thrown on wood fires. They contain heavy metals that can cause intense gastrointestinal irritation and vomiting if eaten. Keep them away from children.

    Do not burn gift wrap paper in the fireplace. A flash fire may result as wrappings ignite suddenly and burn intensely.


    1.Make an appointment with your pet's veterinarian for a checkup, and make sure all vaccinations are up-to-date. Obtain a health certificate from your veterinarian dated within 10 days of departure. For travel outside of the continental United States, additional planning and health care requirements may be necessary. Contact the foreign office of the country you are traveling to for more information.

    2.Make sure your pet has a microchip for identification and is wearing a collar and ID tag. The collar should also include destination information in case your pet escapes.

    3.Book a direct flight whenever possible. This will decrease the chances that your pet is left on the tarmac during extreme weather conditions or mishandled by baggage personnel.

    4.Purchase a USDA-approved shipping crate that is large enough for your pet to stand, sit and turn around in comfortably. Shipping crates can be purchased from many pet supply stores and airlines.

    5.Write the words "Live Animal" in letters at least one inch tall on top of and at least one side of the crate. Use arrows to prominently indicate the upright position of the crate. On the top of the crate, write the name, address and telephone number of your pet's destination point, and whether you will be accompanying him or if someone else is picking him up. Make sure that the door is securely closed, but not locked, so that airline personnel can open it in case of an emergency. Line the crate bottom with some type of bedding—shredded paper or towels—to absorb accidents.

    6.Affix a current photograph of your pet to the top of the crate for identification purposes. Should your pet escape from the carrier, this could be a lifesaver. You should also carry a photograph of your pet.

    7.The night before you leave, make sure you've frozen a small dish or tray of water for your pet. This way, it can't spill during loading, and will melt by the time he's thirsty. Tape a small pouch, preferably cloth, of dried food outside the crate. Airline personnel will be able to feed your pet in case he gets hungry on long-distance flights or a layover.

    8.Tranquilizing your pet is generally not recommended, as it could hamper his breathing. Check with your veterinarian first.

    9.Tell every airline employee you encounter, on the ground and in the air, that you are traveling with a pet in the cargo hold. This way, they'll be ready if any additional considerations or attention is needed.

    10.If the plane is delayed, or if you have any concerns about the welfare of your pet, insist that airline personnel check the animal whenever feasible. In certain situations, removing the animal from the cargo hold and deplaneing may be warranted.


    1.Keep your pets safe and secure in a well-ventilated crate or carrier. There are a variety of wire mesh, hard plastic and soft-sided carriers available. Whatever you choose, make sure it's large enough for your pet to stand, sit, lie down and turn around in. And P.S., it's smart to get your pet used to the carrier in the comfort of your home before your trip.

    2.Get your pet geared up for a long trip by taking him on a series of short drives first, gradually lengthening time spent in the car. And please be sure to always secure the crate so it won't slide or shift in the event of a quick stop.

    3.Your pet's travel-feeding schedule should start with a light meal three to four hours prior to departure. Don't feed your furry friend in a moving vehicle—even if it is a long drive.

    4.Never leave your animal alone in a parked vehicle. On a hot day, even with the windows open, a parked automobile can become a furnace in no time, and heatstroke can develop. In cold weather, a car can act as a refrigerator, holding in the cold and causing the animal to freeze to death.

    5.What in your pet's traveling kit? In addition to travel papers, food, bowl, leash, a waste scoop, plastic bags, grooming supplies, medication and a pet first-aid kit, pack a favorite toy or pillow to give your pet a sense of familiarity.

    6.Make sure your pet has a microchip for identification and wears a collar with a tag imprinted with your home address, as well as a temporary travel tag with your cell phone, destination phone number and any other relevant contact information. Canines should wear flat (never choke!) collars, please.

    7.Don't allow your pet to ride with his head outside the window. He could be injured by flying objects. And please keep him in the back seat in his crate or with a harness attached to a seat buckle.

    8.Traveling across state lines? Bring along your pet's rabies vaccination record, as some states requires this proof at certain interstate crossings. While this generally isn't a problem, it's always smart to be on the safe side.

    9.When it comes to H2O, we say BYO. Opt for bottled water or tap water stored in plastic jugs. Drinking water from an area he's not used to could result in tummy upset for your pet.

    10.If you travel frequently with your pet, you may want to invest in rubberized floor liners and waterproof seat covers, available at auto product retailers.

    12 Schemes of the Holidays - BBB News Center

    Purchasing a Gift Card? Read This First! - BBB News Center

    Make Sure Your Holiday Giving is Wise Giving - BBB News Center

    BBB Tips for Avoiding the Holiday Travel Headache - BBB News Center

    Top Ten Cyber Monday Tips for Staying Safe When Shopping Online - BBB News Center

    Five Steps to Create and Keep a Holiday Budget - BBB News Center
    Last edited by ScoobyDooKiddo; 14-Dec-2012 at 15:48. Reason: Underlines and bolding letter fix and double post plus added topics

  2. #2


    Lots to read here big bro! But all very well put Thanks for posting these reminders! Hope you have a wonderful Christmas!!!

Similar Threads

  1. Why is being safe a crime?
    By Calico in forum Mature Topics
    Replies: 60
    Last Post: 12-Jul-2012, 18:02
  2. Is it safe...?
    By BBalljustin in forum Diaper Talk
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 15-May-2011, 02:37
  3. How Safe Am I?
    By KansanRod44 in forum Diaper Talk
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 17-Apr-2011, 17:13
  4. Ouija - Please be safe.
    By statik in forum Off-topic
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: 11-May-2010, 19:04
  5. Is it safe to have
    By MetalHeadTiffany in forum Diaper Talk
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 13-Aug-2008, 00:01

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  • - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community. is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.