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Thread: Windows 8: You're thoughts and constructive criticism

  1. #1

    Default Windows 8: You're thoughts and constructive criticism

    So, as the title suggests, thread is about Windows 8. You can post your thoughts and constructive criticism here. I say constructive, so that you can give an honest and good reasons, as to why you like or don't like Microsoft's newest version of Windows. You can make comparisons to previous versions of Windows and comparisons to the Mac OSX and other operating systems, do whatever you like.


    Here's my take:

    I'm a person who has been around Windows computers most of my life, I've used MS-DOS, 95, 98, ME, XP, vista, and 7. At the beginning of my college year (2012, this year), I had to purchase a Macbook Pro for school purposes, and not because I wanted to. Having the Macbook gave me different perspectives on both operating systems.

    Shortly after buying my Macbook, I installed the Windows 8 Release Preview onto Bootcamp, which has given me quite a bit of time to use the operating system and learn its quirks and quarks. The best things of the new Windows for me, is the integration of my (or yours) microsoft account into the operating system. All I had to do was log in with my Outlook account, and it took care of Mail, Facebook, and Twitter all at the same time. Skydrive is also an integral part of Windows 8, which allows me to work with all of my documents between both of my operating systems, and on any other computer.

    Windows 8 boots much faster than any other operating system I have ever used, and it beats Mac OSX on it's own computer, even with the boot selection time. Windows 8 runs much faster than Windows 7, yet not quite faster than OSX, but not far behind.

    Windows 8, though great as it is, does have it's draw backs. I for one, found great use of the Start Menu, and was sad to see it go. That sadness, was easily overcome by downloading Start8 by Stardock, which resurrects the start menu, but it is still an inconvenience.

    The new start screen, though great for touch screens, there is little use for it on non-touch screen devices. While it does give a nice look, and maybe there will be more apps that are more mouse friendly, rather than made to touch, it's something that many people use as a reason to stick with Windows 7. Start8 also covers the start screen side of things to, by automatically going to the classic desktop on start-up.

    I still find use in apps like Mail and Facebook, but beyond that, I will be using Windows 8 as my gaming OS and OSX as my productivity (writing and video production) for now. This is a good thing for me, so that my gaming and school are kept separate, and I will be less distracted.

    Anyways, that's my take, I hope I didn't talk about everything, cause I want to hear what other people think.

  2. #2

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    Yea I will weigh in here because I have extremely extensive experience with just about every S that Microsoft has released for desktops and most for server platforms. Add to that several Apple, Linux, and a number of other assorted OS's. I am also a former Sr Engineer for a major chip manufacturer and I have had tons of years in the industry. I have also presented at several industry forums and events.

    Ok, my thoughts on Windows 8 really revolve around my feelings of the industry itself. Personally I do n find myself falling in love with this OS even though I had very early experience with it. I really dislike the interface changes. Look, Vista was not so much and I feel that Win 7 was in the right direction. It's not that I need the start menu or an interface designed for a traditional desktop but I dislike the overall trend behind hiding the underbelly of the OS. Ok, I want a start menu and get rid of Metro.

    There are some old technological enhancements but then I really feel they moved in the direction that they did because of the pressure to move away from traditional desktops to tablets. So now is a good time to comment on this trend. I love my tablet, so don't get me wrong, but I can not see accomplishing most of my work on anything but my desktop. There are just certain areas where a tablet is unlikely to ever have the horse power. This is a tough situation because Microsoft is clearly feeling the pressure to move to the tablet, and they are far behind the trend so they are likely feeling a bit on the mortal side at this point.

    I noticed a year or so ago that I would walk into my local popular consumer electronics store. They have one or two desktops, a couple of desktops and tons of tablets. This is clearly the future and we will have to deal with this fact. At the same time the viability of desktops and desktop OS's is likely to suffer significantly. In fact if Microsoft fails to achieve a reasonable pickup rate they risk leaving the face of this earth, and it won't be the first time we have lost a large technology leader that at one time was apparently too big to go away.

    So I don't like Windows 8 but I will put up with it until Adobe, Avid and a couple of other companies start to fully support SuSE or some other professional Linux based platform. I might end up moving fully to Apple because this is a supported platform for most of the software I rely on these days.

  3. #3

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    Been out of the windows loop for some time, so this is largely an outside observation.

    Windows 8 feels like a desperate attempt to jump into the tablet arena. RIM has shown us what happens when you stick to your guns and refuse to go with the crowd, and Microsoft probably doesn't want to be in the same position in a few years. Can't say I blame them. They see the writing on the wall, and if tablets do destroy the traditional PC (I don't entirely buy into that.. but it's at least possible) they might find their market suddenly ripped out from under them.

    Personally I hate the tablet thing, but then again I hate much of where this industry is heading (major split between computers and meda consumption devices, patents patents patents.., "cloud" computing, software as a service, etc.. hate it all!).

  4. #4

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    I wish I could give you constructive criticism...... but the bottom line is that some versions of windows are actually beta tests with the buyer as the guinea pig.

    Two versions of windows that were disasters IMO:

    Windows ME
    Windows Vista

    Yes, windows Vista was a slight step up in 64 bit compatibility, but they royally messed up tons of things. It really was an un-needed OS and I would describe Vista as a beta test to produce an actual improvement on windows which was Windows 7.

    Windows XP was a valid windows with EXTREME compatibility and functionality. When you want something to work, you went with XP. This is what windows 7 has become. Windows Vista always fell short in that department because it was a piece of software being tested on you, the buyer.

    Windows 8 is an un-needed OS. It is simply doing graphical and input modifications that could just as easily be done with an installed program. Windows 8 is a test market item, you, the buyer are being tested.

  5. #5

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    I was planning to buy a new computer sometime soon... probably sometime in December. I was actaully thinking if I should go for Windows 8 or stick with Windows 7.... so far from what I see, 8 isn't that appealing to me... it make me leads towards to stick with 7.

  6. #6

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    When I first tested the beta of windows 8 I hated it a lot. I've used a lot of microsoft os's and have used mac and linux. Recently I decided to try the RTM version of windows 8. It's actually not that bad. It's meant for tablets. I wouldn't really recommend windows 8 if you don't have some sort of muti-touch interface. So I spent about 2 days playing with windows 8 and I can tell you this.

    1) I learned I used Alt+Tab, Alt+F4, and escape a lot to navigate around.
    2) Every corner that you mouse to on the desktop has some action linked to it.
    3) if you mouse over to the top or bottom right of the desktop you get a sub menu.
    4) The search in the sub menu is the new start button. You can search and see programs listed here.
    5) Metro is not that bad but Some apps don't work too well yet such as chrome.
    6) if you install chrome it installs a app in metro and browser on the desktop. If you use the app, it doesn't show what you were searching in the browser.
    7) I like the IM+ app which lets you add all your IM accounts to one area.
    8) Nothing actually closes unless you Alt+F4 or drag the program downward. Alt+f4 is way easier. (if you don't close the app it uses ram)
    9) "fast boot" is just hibernation. When you click on shutdown it doesn't shutdown. It hibernates in a way so when you start it back up it seems fast.
    10) If you choose to reboot it will perform an actual shutdown and reboot.
    11) the new task manager is really nice.

    Overall I think windows 8 is not to bad but I think it could be better. However I think microsoft pushing us to use muti-touch devices will make it so we use this technology more in the future.

  7. #7

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    To those comparing Windows 8 to Vista or ME:
    That's like comparing a fighter jet to a horse. Vista and to a larger extent ME were mistakes, in operation and design, Windows 8 works much faster on any machine, than windows 7 or even XP (over a gb of RAM). Vista's biggest blunder was that the hardware at the time wasn't able to fully support the OS (though there are instances of fully loaded machines performing poorly). What a lot of people don't know is that when Microsoft was producing Vista they had plans for a radically changed OS on the inside but realized after two years that it needed a couple more years of work before it would be anywhere near production ready, thus Vista was born, they knew it was half-baked, but it was all ready a year late so they had no choice but to give something (or so they felt). Even Windows 7 wasn't a fulfillment of the revamped internals and Windows 8 is only one more baby step in the right direction, though even that might be too big as we see the App Store stands empty and bereft of quality applications.
    While everyone like to talk about how awesome XP was they all seem to forget how hopelessly unsecure it was, Microsoft saw that insecurity as a serious issue and has been trying to solve it ever since, they can't do what Apple did and just drop all their existing users (when they went from "Classic OS" to "OS X"). Instead they're forced to hold the entire industry by the hand and lead them onto a much more secure OS, which will probably happen with "windows 10-11" (or whatever they chose to name it).

  8. #8

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    I wrote a somewhat hesitant scathing indictment of Windows 8 based on my experiences, and at least some of those thoughts are still present - I still hate the social integration and Metro interface, but in reality, i've grown accustomed to it. While it's not my primary OS on my productivity/gaming machine, it's been working solidly on my rebuilt Media PC for a month now, and I do think it may be a faster running OS than 7 is. I'm not ready to make the switch - I have 7 working wonderfully on this beast, and it will remain as such, and I want to see how this 'catastrophe' as Gabe Newell put it pans out.

    It was mentioned that Microsoft doesn't want to stick to their guns like RIM did - they certainly don't, and aren't... but if they make the major online game distributors antsy, they'll see their dominance as the largest game platform fall by the wayside in favour of competing against free and designer operating systems like Android and iOS respectively. Given the choice between the Windows 8 walled garden, the Apple equivalent, or the chaotic semi-walled semi-garden that is Android, I'm not sure where I'd prefer to be... I'm also not sure where I'd prefer to develop - at least my web apps are safe for now.

  9. #9

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by lilaznboy View Post
    When I first tested the beta of windows 8 I hated it a lot. I've used a lot of microsoft os's and have used mac and linux. Recently I decided to try the RTM version of windows 8. It's actually not that bad. It's meant for tablets. I wouldn't really recommend windows 8 if you don't have some sort of muti-touch interface. So I spent about 2 days playing with windows 8 and I can tell you this.

    1) I learned I used Alt+Tab, Alt+F4, and escape a lot to navigate around.
    2) Every corner that you mouse to on the desktop has some action linked to it.
    3) if you mouse over to the top or bottom right of the desktop you get a sub menu.
    4) The search in the sub menu is the new start button. You can search and see programs listed here.
    5) Metro is not that bad but Some apps don't work too well yet such as chrome.
    6) if you install chrome it installs a app in metro and browser on the desktop. If you use the app, it doesn't show what you were searching in the browser.
    7) I like the IM+ app which lets you add all your IM accounts to one area.
    8) Nothing actually closes unless you Alt+F4 or drag the program downward. Alt+f4 is way easier. (if you don't close the app it uses ram)
    9) "fast boot" is just hibernation. When you click on shutdown it doesn't shutdown. It hibernates in a way so when you start it back up it seems fast.
    10) If you choose to reboot it will perform an actual shutdown and reboot.
    11) the new task manager is really nice.

    Overall I think windows 8 is not to bad but I think it could be better. However I think microsoft pushing us to use muti-touch devices will make it so we use this technology more in the future.
    These are some of my observations as well.

    I am not looking for a multi touch interface for my desktop OS. For me pushing the move in this direction is really just troublesome. I see no reason that desktop and tablet platforms can't reman separate.

    Add to this that I have a multi thousand dollar investment in software and I really do not want to have to upgrade everything just for the privilege of having a different OS. Not a wise move for Microsoft.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Quote Originally Posted by Vaccine View Post
    To those comparing Windows 8 to Vista or ME:
    That's like comparing a fighter jet to a horse. Vista and to a larger extent ME were mistakes, in operation and design, Windows 8 works much faster on any machine, than windows 7 or even XP (over a gb of RAM). Vista's biggest blunder was that the hardware at the time wasn't able to fully support the OS (though there are instances of fully loaded machines performing poorly). What a lot of people don't know is that when Microsoft was producing Vista they had plans for a radically changed OS on the inside but realized after two years that it needed a couple more years of work before it would be anywhere near production ready, thus Vista was born, they knew it was half-baked, but it was all ready a year late so they had no choice but to give something (or so they felt). Even Windows 7 wasn't a fulfillment of the revamped internals and Windows 8 is only one more baby step in the right direction, though even that might be too big as we see the App Store stands empty and bereft of quality applications.
    While everyone like to talk about how awesome XP was they all seem to forget how hopelessly unsecure it was, Microsoft saw that insecurity as a serious issue and has been trying to solve it ever since, they can't do what Apple did and just drop all their existing users (when they went from "Classic OS" to "OS X"). Instead they're forced to hold the entire industry by the hand and lead them onto a much more secure OS, which will probably happen with "windows 10-11" (or whatever they chose to name it).
    Windows Vista was not a problem with hardware, it was an issue of a poorly executed OS design. The biggest complaints were a result of gratuitous interface changes for the sake of change. At least with 7 the interface changes made sense.

    The big mistake is that the marketing requirement was the biggest requirement behind Windows 8.

    We will see how quickly this OS is accepted or how fast it flops. My prediction is that it will be good for tablets, but of little too late, and will generally flop in the desktop space.

  10. #10

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    I think microsoft is looking toward the future with this OS. It has many improvments that make it a great OS for low memory computers like tablets. it is also more secure than the previous windows OS's. The interface does not work great for desk top pcs with no touch capability. In my opinion there should be two versions. one designed to be used on the traditional pc and the other for the tablet. a tablet is probly not going to be used in the same way as the desktop so trying to get both to work the same way is a mistake. its kind of like the diference between server and workstion.

    so in conclusion i feel microsoft is just trying someting out. under the hood windows 8 is a great improvement that should not be overlooked. but the outside apearence needs to be more specialized to the eviroment it is running in.

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