Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Plans for my Future

  1. #1

    Default Plans for my Future

    Hey guys it's me again . I have been inactive for a little while whilst I catch up on some editing work :P.

    So to the main point I was wondering what you guys though of my future plan.
    So for a while I wanted to become an anesthesiologist but now I am thinking I want to go to college for a while to become a nurse and work in a childrens hospital while going to college again to become a neurosurgeon (a surgeon that specializes for the spine and brain).

    I think the reason I want to switch is because after the accident I had with my family I was returned to normal health (and a LOT of pain) because of my neurosurgeon.

    Tell me what you guys think down bellow I will probably read them tomorrow morning.

  2. #2

    Default

    I think it is a very admirable aspiration, but I think it is important to work out whether it is what you actually want to do (which you can do by reflecting, talking to relevant people, doing work experience, and just seeing whether the aspiration stands the test of time), or whether it is gratitude and admiration for those who helped your recovery that makes you feel like it ought to be your future plan and career path. I say this because I know a lot of people who've gone through serious treatments (of various varieties) and then want to take up the career of a specialist associated with their care and rehabilitation, but I'm not sure that that is a motivation that will hold out long term, and you certainly would need very robust motivating factors to take you through medical school and into such a competitive speciality.

    I don't mean to deter you: I think medicine is a wonderful profession, but it is a long haul, and your motivation for doing it needs to be very strong and robust. From experience, I think, also, that choosing a medical speciality at this stage is not nearly as important as working out whether medicine is right for you: I know very few medics who have ended up in the specialities they had in mind when they started training... You experience an awful lot during studying and training, and that is much more likely to influence the direction you end up taking. By all means dream (!) and arrange work experience because having targets is excellent, but be open minded and if you pursue medicine then allow yourself to try out all the different possibilities to see what fits you best.

    Finally, I'm not sure that nursing would fit in with medical training: nursing alone is a very tiring and stressful occupation, and would be hard to sustain on the side of such an intense, involved, and time-consuming course.

  3. #3
    Troymanxp

    Default

    Wow, that's so cool! Seems like you have it all figured out (:

  4. #4

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Anxious View Post
    I think it is a very admirable aspiration, but I think it is important to work out whether it is what you actually want to do (which you can do by reflecting, talking to relevant people, doing work experience, and just seeing whether the aspiration stands the test of time), or whether it is gratitude and admiration for those who helped your recovery that makes you feel like it ought to be your future plan and career path. I say this because I know a lot of people who've gone through serious treatments (of various varieties) and then want to take up the career of a specialist associated with their care and rehabilitation, but I'm not sure that that is a motivation that will hold out long term, and you certainly would need very robust motivating factors to take you through medical school and into such a competitive speciality.

    I don't mean to deter you: I think medicine is a wonderful profession, but it is a long haul, and your motivation for doing it needs to be very strong and robust. From experience, I think, also, that choosing a medical speciality at this stage is not nearly as important as working out whether medicine is right for you: I know very few medics who have ended up in the specialities they had in mind when they started training... You experience an awful lot during studying and training, and that is much more likely to influence the direction you end up taking. By all means dream (!) and arrange work experience because having targets is excellent, but be open minded and if you pursue medicine then allow yourself to try out all the different possibilities to see what fits you best.

    Finally, I'm not sure that nursing would fit in with medical training: nursing alone is a very tiring and stressful occupation, and would be hard to sustain on the side of such an intense, involved, and time-consuming course.
    It's not so much admiration as it is that I have always liked to help people and I know there's always jobs in medicine.

  5. #5

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by maxipoo View Post
    It's not so much admiration as it is that I have always liked to help people and I know there's always jobs in medicine.
    Just because there are jobs in medicine does not mean you should go into medicine. Medicine is tough as hell to get in to, over here you see so many qualified candidates turned away on a yearly basis and I'm sure it's the same where you live. Only the best of the best get accepted but not only will you need good grades but they're after people who have good extra-cirriculars and perhaps some work experience in a hospital. It isn't impossible but be prepared for a long, hard road ahead that may not even guarantee a result. Nursing would be good but either do that or medicine rather than both, not only is this a good idea from a financial point but both degrees will be different so not everything you'd learn in nursing would be useful for neurosurgeons.

    At 15 I'd say you're too young to know exactly what you want to do at college, let alone for the rest of your life. Things change and you may not feel passionate towards medicine next year or the year after, when me and my friends were applying to university 3 years ago we all learned a few things about one another while some went for the courses that we knew they would go for there were others that really surprised us with their choice and that could be you. Talk to people, whether it be your teachers or your family about what would be a good choice and perhaps try and ask a doctor or current med student about what they did on the course, you may find it isn't for you.

  6. #6

    Default

    I can speak from a bit of experience in regards to this matter. I'm currently a third year medical student (my degree is six years) and needless to say it can be a lot of work. I was lucky however that i had a lot of previous experience in the medical profession (my sister studied and is now a practicing doctor) so i knew what med school would entail and how much work was expected. Even with me knowing what i had to do it is still a lot harder then i initially expected.

    Im not trying to turn you away from medicine because if it is what you want to do it can be a highly rewarding course to do. The best part is the fact that every day i go to classes, there is always something new that i am doing (and whilst this is a fantastic thing as i am never bored by what we are learning, it can make it difficult to study everything that we have learnt). Studying a medical based degree does entail a lot of work and you really do need to keep on top of things (otherwise everything becomes too much).

    Ultimately, medicine is a hard degree to study (and to get into as well) but the reality is that it can be very rewarding. Might i also suggest you take a look at some of the free medical journals that you can subscribe to as that way you can get some of the latest information about the medical field (and something there may peek your interests). Also, keep up to date with the latest information about the profession. I know for a fact that the jobs in medicine are not as guaranteed as they used to be (especially in Australia) where we have more students then intern places. So if you are looking at seriously getting into the medical profession, i would highly recommend looking for some kind of scholarship that will guarantee you an internship/job (even if it is in the middle of nowhere).

    Also, once you get into medicine, even after you graduate there can be problems with getting the specialty that you want to be in. in some cases, trying to get into specialties can be harder then getting into medical school. Neurosurgery is one of the professions (along with an anaesthetist, radiology and a few other) due to the fact that there are a number of people who want to do them and there are limited places. Some people apply to get into neurosurgery every year for a few years before they can get accepted (and some can apply for several years in a row and not get in at all). If you are looking at going into any of these professions, i would highly recommend that you look at doing the best you can in medical school (for starters). Scholarships can also help you secure a place in some of the professions that are harder to get into (such as anaesthetics). But when you are in medical school, look at doing as much as you can so that when you graduate, your CV looks highly desirable. So look for scholarships (i cant stress that enough) or get involved in research (if you are able to go and do honours coursework). Even when you get out of medical school, look for other ways that you can increase our skills (i.e. do a diploma in another field of medicine or even in the field you want to. You can get diplomas in anaesthetics which can be recognised by some of the anaesthetic schools which gives you more credit and makes it more likely you will get in).

    But, if you are really serious in studying medicine, i wish you all the best. It is a long road and it can be quite difficult. Remember though, medicine is a profession where you will not be able to stop at all because new things come out all the time and you need to stay on top of it. This means that it is a degree that you are learning for life. Hopefully that will help answer some questions that you have about medicine. If you want to ask anything specific to me, feel free to PM me, or you can post on here too.

    zeek61

  7. #7
    Falkio

    Default

    The above post by zeek61 is brilliant. Very well said, mate.

    I'm a biochemistry student interested in pharmacy, so I have a little bit of input as far as going about your undergraduate work. If you're only 15, I highly suggest doing AP courses for college credit. It'll allow you to expedite the process of getting your undergraduate degree because you won't need to retake those courses. Doing something like medicine requires many years of study, so the more efficient you are about undergrad, the sooner you get to the good stuff. If you're thinking about going into a professional program, it's important to maintain your GPA and accumulate practical experience for when you apply to a program. Try volunteering at a hospital or doing something relevant to your long term career goals. To give me a competitive edge, I'm actually licensed to work as a pharmacy tech in most states. As soon as I satisfy the last requirements for Washington state (where its more involved than most), I'm going to apply for an assistant position to gain experience for school. These sort of things help when you apply, as the decision goes beyond grades.

    That being said, I'd encourage you to consider a community college for general education credits and your majors level, lower division classes. From experience, I can tell you that community colleges are generally more forgiving. You can expect smaller class sizes, easier instructors, and less difficult exam content. There are exceptions, of course. Plus, if you're at a university, you can expect to be graded on a curve, which means you're essentially competing with all of your classmates for a high GPA. With classes full of very talented people, it gets tough to "beat the curve". Hypothetically speaking, even if you do exceptionally well, you might still receive a low grade, as scores aren't totally based on absolute value like they are without the curve. I saw curves much less at my community college. Going this route can help preserve your GPA until you start taking tougher classes, not to mention its astronomically cheaper on a per-credit basis than a university in the state of California.

    Lastly, whoever mentioned that nursing isn't a good preparatory degree for medicine is right. I considered doing the same thing for undergrad very briefly. All the information I could find on the topic said that it was an inefficient way to do things. If you're committed to becoming a doctor, I'd major in chemistry or biochemistry. Biology is a decent choice too. Whenever I have questions about anything, I go to Student Doctor Network for advice. Its a forum for people in all stages of their medical careers. You might want to check it out.

    Anyway, good luck in whatever you do! Its a long, hard road, but totally worth it when you're done. I'm not even a grad student yet, but I'm working towards my goal one semester (or quarter) at a time. Just stick with it and do your best.

  8. #8

    Default

    First off, I have to agree with the others in saying that, if you do want to go into it, any kind of medicine is an excellent field to go into and will be extremely rewarding, both financially and morally. You'll meet many interesting and exciting people, you'll get to see all aspects of the world for how they really are, and you'll get to say that, "I saved that person's life." Oh, and you'll walk away with a pretty penny. Not bad.

    However, as others have mentioned, medical school is very difficult. I have no doubts that if you want to be a doctor you could be; that's not the concern here. Rather, the concern is, once you get into medical school, will you be able to handle it? And not just physically, but psychologically as well. It's one thing to say, "I want to be a doctor." - It's a whole different ballpark to actually do four years of college, four years of medical school, one year interning, and five to six years of residency (that's 14-15 years total) just to be able to practice neurosurgery. Assuming you graduate high school when you're 18, and you take no breaks whatsoever, the earliest you could become a practicing doctor is 32 years old. That's a huge commitment.

    Now, again, I absolutely do not think this should deter you from your goal. If you do decide to go into any field of neuroscience, my hat goes off to you. It's one of the most important positions in any field, and it's one of the most up-and-coming fields in the next few years. There are so many different utilizations for neuroscience, it's quite amazing. Actually, I might just be there with you - I've been very seriously considering getting my B.S. in Neuroscience, and then a Ph.D in some form of Clinical Psychology. Really, if you want to help people, psychology is the way to go. I know that "everyone studies psychology," but they really only do it at the undergraduate level. Once you graduate, you can immediately go into a doctoral program where the number of people involved drops like a rock. Psychology and neuroscience go hand-in-hand; in order to have a basic understanding of the brain, you must understand psychology, and vice versa.

    You're still only 15 years old, you have so much time to figure out what you want to do. I strongly recommend taking AP Psychology, if it's offered at your school; it'll give you quite a bit of insight into neuroscience, as well as some sociology and anatomy. Really though, most of psychology has some connection to neuroscience. Do what you please with your life. Find something that makes you happy, and stick with it. If you find out maybe you don't like it, switch to something else. The rest is up to you!~

    ~The Foxxeh Assassin~

  9. #9
    iCrinkle

    Default

    WOW you really plan ahead! I just want to go to college to get my business administration degree. And get a job as a manager at an Apple retail store. I plan very practically

  10. #10

    Default

    All good advise from above and far more knowledgeable than me. I am an educator however, so I'll add my two cents. As was mentioned, you have to have the grades and they need to be in advanced placement classes, so that's your first step. I assume you have guidance counselors, so they should be able to give you some advise. Should you show the aptitude, your next step would be to get accepted into a pre-med school, if it's anything like it is here in the U. S. Once you're in a pre-medical school, you'll be with other medical students in a university that can better direct you into an appropriate direction based on your abilities.

    Remember that as you age, you will mature and some of your questions you will be able to answer for yourself. You will know how you did in your classes, what grades your received for your work, and that will reveal a great deal.

Similar Threads

  1. Halloween: Plans?
    By Mandy in forum Off-topic
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: 22-Oct-2011, 16:28
  2. what are/where your plans when you move out?
    By dragsnick in forum Adult Babies & Littles
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 30-Jul-2011, 05:30
  3. Replies: 56
    Last Post: 15-Jul-2008, 02:03
  4. Canada Day Plans
    By starshine in forum Off-topic
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 03-Jul-2008, 17:28

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
ADISC.org - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community.
ADISC.org is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.