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Thread: Another HDD bites the dust

  1. #1

    Default Another HDD bites the dust

    Ok so tonight out of no where my 3rd HDD in 3 years went out on my Laptop. I'm going for a new one Saturday but this is starting to be a real problem. I have an HP G60 and was using a WS3200 7400rmp HDD, when it went out tonight it was just making a clicking sound, any ideas why/what would have happened? And how to prevent my HDD from going out in the future?

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2

    Default

    Newer hard disk drives have motion sensing technology that park the needle if any abnormal movement is sensed to protect them from heavy shock. As such, portable computers that are not used on flatter surfaces or that are picked up during use will generally cause degradation to happen much faster, more so because it's a moving mechanism that will eventually fail regardless.

    Use your computer on a flat surface and put it into standby prior to moving it should allow it to last longer.

  3. #3

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    Do you move your laptop around a lot while it's running? Traditional spinning disk drives are sensitive to movement (especially when operating).

    Could also be a lack of cooling.

    Might consider getting a solid state disk (SSD). They are more expensive and less capacity per dollar.. but no moving parts means you can shake `em all you want! Also they produce less heat and are less effected by high temperatures.

  4. #4

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    Yeah i Move my laptop a lot, it's sitting on a bench in my room and I pick it up to use it since I can't see it where it's sitting, and really have no place to sit it to where I would be able to see it good.

    I'll try to start keeping it in standby until im seated and ready to use it. hopefully that will help

  5. #5

    Default

    maybe try an ssd?

    edit: never mind... i forgot to read the posts above; boundcoder hit the nail on the head.

  6. #6

  7. #7

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    Well after looking them over, a SSD HDD will be my best bet but at the moment i cant afford the price for one, the best I've found is 120gb for $216.00. I would need at least a 120gb because the software Zoom Text I use is a resource hog. So for now i'll just drop the $80 on another WD 320HDD and save up for a better one this year.

    If anyone comes across a good 120-250GB SSD SATA HDD for laptop please let me know and thanks again guys

  8. #8

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    you have a very fast rpm hard drive. thats a no-no in a notebook. I would never recommend anything faster than 5400 RPM in a notebook for a few reasons. excess heat first and foremost. also at a higher RPM, the drive will be more sensitive to movement, bumps, dings, etc. there is very little benefit to a higher RPM hard drive, and the negatives far outweigh anything gained. the simple truth is, hard drives in notebooks will always fail much sooner than those in a desktop, because they operate under very mechanically stressful circumstances. the easiest way to avoid this is of course to switch to an SSD and then use an external HD for your main storage space (or a secondary internal if your notebook allows such) but SSD's are still very expensive for decent storage capacity. so my best advice would be to 1: get a slower hard drive. 5400 RPM is the industry standard for a very good reason! 2: better cooling. if you can upgrade the internal fan (most likely not) then do so, but you could also just make sure to not set your notebook on surfaces that don't allow proper venting of air from underneath.

  9. #9

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Seamuis View Post
    you have a very fast rpm hard drive. thats a no-no in a notebook. I would never recommend anything faster than 5400 RPM in a notebook for a few reasons. excess heat first and foremost. also at a higher RPM, the drive will be more sensitive to movement, bumps, dings, etc. there is very little benefit to a higher RPM hard drive, and the negatives far outweigh anything gained. the simple truth is, hard drives in notebooks will always fail much sooner than those in a desktop, because they operate under very mechanically stressful circumstances. the easiest way to avoid this is of course to switch to an SSD and then use an external HD for your main storage space (or a secondary internal if your notebook allows such) but SSD's are still very expensive for decent storage capacity. so my best advice would be to 1: get a slower hard drive. 5400 RPM is the industry standard for a very good reason! 2: better cooling. if you can upgrade the internal fan (most likely not) then do so, but you could also just make sure to not set your notebook on surfaces that don't allow proper venting of air from underneath.
    Oh thank you! I never thought to much about the higher RPM being a no no, I'll definitely go back to a 5400. Now I've tried an external HD before but it stooped working after just a few days, not sure why, I kept it plugged in and fixed to my Laptop but it just stopped letting me transfer data to it. But i'll look at a lower SSD HD and and external for all my other stuff. But do I just load Windows on the SSD and all my software onto the External?

  10. #10

    Default

    well, some might say thats BS, because they use higher, etc. blah blah. but the truth is, 5400 RPM is industry standard and for good reason. there is nothing that will really be gained by having any faster with a 2.5" notebook drive. at least not for everyday computing. an SSD is a good choice. my main hard drive is a 480GB SSD (and yes it was very expensive) but if you have a lot of applications (software) then you will need a larger main hard drive. although its possible to load your applications on a separate hard drive, thats not really the best solution. for a windows setup (I assume you are running windows 7?) what you want to do is have all your applications (software) loaded on your main hard drive and al of your personal files either on a separate partition on the same drive or a second drive. unless you are trying to run a raid array or something else, this is the best way of keeping personal files safe in a general manner from OS crashes or hard drive sector problems. what kind of external drive did you try? I never recommend getting those sleek all in one deals. what you should do is get a large capacity notebook drive and put it into a USB external case. this gives you a travel capable hard drive that can be easily user replaced. if you do get an SSD, then no, your software should be loaded onto the same drive as your OS, in this case the SSD. the problem with a low capacity SSD is simply that it will limit you on the number of software applications you can have installed, because space is limited and more space comes at a premium. the best 'bang for your buck' I think, would be to get the largest capacity 5400 RPM drive you can afford (check newegg.com, as they always have great prices and fast shipping) create one partition for your OS and software and a second partition on the same drive for storing essential personal files such as photos, movies, music, etc. so they are always with your notebook. then, if and when you can afford to, get a second high capacity hard drive, an external USB powered HDD case to put it in and use that for a backup drive. keep all your personal files backed up, in case of a hard drive failure.

    a clue on prices:

    a 90GB Corsair SSD (smaller capacity version the drive I have in my macbook) is 119.99. thats about $1.33 per GB.
    Newegg.com - Corsair Force Series 3 CSSD-F90GB3-BK 2.5" 90GB SATA III Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)

    a 750GB Seagate Momentus HDD is 119.99. thats about $0.16 per GB
    Newegg.com - Seagate Momentus ST9750423AS 750GB 5400 RPM 16MB Cache 2.5" SATA 3.0Gb/s Internal Notebook Hard Drive

    now this is just a quick comparison, so nobody say 'oh but you can get X cheaper!, etc.' because my point is, unless you absolutely need the speed of an SSD or can afford a large capacity one, you are getting more for your money by simply getting a slower, high capacity drive. you get 660GB more for the same money in the example above! trust me, moving down to 5400 RPM WILL make the drive less susceptible to failure. (it can also help with battery life) oh, and that seagate is what I used before upgrading to a 1TB drive, and I never had a problem with it. a great drive.

    also, you might want to check with the manufacturer of you HDD to make sure if the drive is still under their warranty, as they will often replace it for free if it failed within the timeframe. I had 3! western digital drives replaced for free before I stopped using the brand because of failures.
    Last edited by Seamuis; 02-Feb-2012 at 16:33.

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