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Thread: Question for artists.

  1. #1

    Default Question for artists.

    How did you get started?

    Did any of you study art in school? Did you just pick up a pencil and start doodling? How did you improve and get better in your techniques, etc? What would you suggest for others that want to start drawing?

    I guess that was more than one question, but i would still love to hear your advice.

  2. #2
    epicshortkid

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    well for one im more of an abstract artist and i dont draw too often but if you wanna get good at drawing just doodle a lott, also the way i got started was my friend made me take an art class with her and ii loved it

  3. #3

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    I became fairly good at traditional art through school, as I chose Art as one of my qualifications. However, you don't learn to draw anything without having it in front of you in school where I live, and I doubt it's that way anywhere else. Regardless, this is a good way to hone your skills and techniques and learn about light sources and shading.

    In high school, I just started drawing what I feel like onto paper. I found that All my sketches looked misfigured and, frankly, bad. But I kept practicing and I'm a lot better at just drawing what I'm thinking of without seeing it. I got a graphics tablet a while ago. I only really draw my furry art on the computer. I draw diffirent things in traditional styles, but I'm sure you can draw furries traditionally. I've seen many people do it before.

  4. #4

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    i picked up a pencil, got some 7-up, mixed it with a glass of kool aid, and scribbled

    and i kept at it

  5. #5

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    i started doodling random stuff back in middle school. got better over the years, asked for opinoins, approached the masters and asked for their opinions, kept at it. I'm a cartoonist now.
    not a well known one, or even well liked, but a cartoonist nontheless.


    best suggestion: when they tell you that you suck, thumb your nose at em and keep drawing anyway, you'll prove em wrong. may take a while, but you will.

  6. #6

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    Well, it all started with my love for racing and tuned cars. I remember watching chip foose doing his designs on tv, and I ended up giving it a try.
    As time passed by, my love for cars slowly diminished, and I moved onto fan art and requests some friends made to me, and then I stumbled across the furry fandom and I fell in love with the artsy side of it.
    I actually met my now boyfriend through a drawing on furaffinity :3

  7. #7

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    So are you planning on taking up drawing?

    I guess I was just one of those kids that really liked drawing. Much of my elementary school days were spent, not paying attention in class, but drawing. At first it was just doodles of random stuff, kids stuff, y'know. Along came The Lion King and I was taken with it; I guess the first stuff I really put effort into was Lion King fan art ^^;. I was maybe 8. But later in elementary school I got more serious about it, actually taking the time to seek out references (photographic and IRL) and study shading. That's a big deal, I think, at first: drawing from observation. My obsession was animals, especially big cats (obviously this was from photographs, lol).

    So advice numero uno: look at everything, really look with a ream of sketchbook paper and a pencil. It's surprising how much eyes can gloss over details if one doesn't make a concentrated effort to see what is there. You could spend a long time just looking at your hand in its various positions and drawing that.

    In high school, we finally had art classes, so I took art every year ^^. It wasn't all drawing, and certainly not all pencil drawing, so I mostly learned a lot about other mediums. I was also encouraged to branch out from just drawing animals, so I did--the usual still life observations, perspective work, landscapes, humans, abstract craziness. One thing that I think was unfortunate was that not a lot of time was spent on human anatomy. I recommend picking up a book on anatomy, geared towards artists. Study the bones and especially the muscles and look up some general 'rules of thumb' about the proportions of the human body (it comes in handy for furries, too): http://www.drawinghowtodraw.com/draw...proportion.png

    In college, I had some art classes and I was lucky to have that. We had a veery small little visual arts department that consisted of two professors (and one of them started the department; before her, there was none). But it was a technical school, so not surprising; I did get into a dedicated art school, too, but decided on a different career path.

    Anyways, at the college I actually went to, I learned how to put more of a professional edge on things; I had a lot more exposure to different media and, more importantly, quality media. For example, there is a world of difference between Crayola colored pencils and Prismacolor; between computer paper and Bristol or illustration board; between my old trusty #2 pencil and a set of drawings pencils with a full range of graphite hardnesses; between those washed-out grade school tray watercolors and the infinitely more vivid and beautiful concentrated tube watercolors (not to mention proper watercolor paper). Much of what I learned was proper media handling and a whooole lot of useful tips and techniques from one very experienced artist (and a number of guest lecturers).

    If you want that kind of exposure to traditional media, I recommend seeking out art workshops in your area or taking a college course.

    If digital is going to be your thing, there is a lot of help online for that. I'm sure there are now college courses for digital as well, but maybe that is more of a money/time commitment than you are looking for. But yeah, there's a lot of help online and that's what I'm making use of right now, since I'm now working on improving my digital work. One thing that took me a little while to realize is: work bigger than you intend the finished size to be. With traditional I'm used to working actual-size and changing tools to accommodate varying levels of detail. But with digital there is the benefit of zooming in to work on detail. Make use of layers; I like keeping background and characters separate, along with having separate layers for sketch, lineart, color, and shading (this is simplifying things a lot, but it's basically the idea). And of course, tools count for something, too; I consider a decent (not laggy) pressure-sensitive tablet a necessity. Programs are up to personal taste and budget, but MSPaint probably isn't going to cut it. I use Photoshop (yay school discounts), but its prohibitively expensive if you're paying full price and aren't a business. I've heard good things about Paint Tool SAI. GIMP is a good free program, but I wouldn't call it painting-friendly in its default configuration (haven't tried 'em, but there are plugins/add-ons to help with that: gps-gimp-paint-studio - Gimp + GPS (gimp paint studio) - Google Project Hosting).

    Yeah, figures I'd write an off-the-cuff essay on this >.<. Hope some of this helped.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tygon View Post
    So are you planning on taking up drawing?
    EEP! That was a long response. Yeah, i am thinking about it. I have always had a bit of interest in graphic arts, more advertising and video graphics, but i am kinda wanting to venture out some. And the more i peruse FA, the more jealous i get of others talents. I don't plan on being the next Tavi or even the next Tygon, but i would love to have even a percentage of some of the talent that you and others have. And i think it is something i could excel at (eventually) if i put some effort into it.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by ABalex View Post
    EEP! That was a long response. Yeah, i am thinking about it. I have always had a bit of interest in graphic arts, more advertising and video graphics, but i am kinda wanting to venture out some.
    Lol, yeah, sorry, I can get like that about art as I'm sure you've already noticed ^^;

    I've gotta say that it's not so much talent as a lot of time and effort, so you've already got the right attitude. Got any software or a tablet picked out, or are you going to start old-school (and inexpensively) with a sketchbook and pencils?

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tygon View Post
    Lol, yeah, sorry, I can get like that about art as I'm sure you've already noticed ^^;

    I've gotta say that it's not so much talent as a lot of time and effort, so you've already got the right attitude. Got any software or a tablet picked out, or are you going to start old-school (and inexpensively) with a sketchbook and pencils?
    I do have CS5 and i barely use it actually. I have some novice experience with Photoshop CS5. I also have Microsoft Digital Imaging Suite 2006. I have not gotten a tablet yet. Just looking for like a $20-40 one to start off with, to see if this is something i am really interested in or not.

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