Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 30

Thread: Lucid dreaming

  1. #1

    Default Lucid dreaming

    Hey, so earlier today i took a nap after my morning classes, and i had a lucid dream. For those who dont know, a lucid dream is where u realize u are dreaming and you can sometimes control and change the things around you. Lately ive been having them more frequently, and ive noticed they tend to happen more when i take a nap in the middle of the day.

    Anyway, whenever i realize that im dreaming, i instantly try to make it AB related. sometimes it works, sometimes it doesnt. If i try too hard to change things i just wake up. But in the past ive been able to change my dream so that im wearing diapers and baby clothes. Today, i was able to change my dream so that i was wearing diapers and started to breast feed from a mommy, but then i woke up.

    I was wondering if anyone else has similar experiences or advice on how to lucid dream better.

  2. #2

    Default

    Never have been able to do that. I'm interested though. So I'll be sure to remember this if I ever realize that I'm dreaming.

  3. #3

    Default

    No, I don't have any tips, but here's some fun facts for you, lucid dreaming is a pretty rare thing, I think its like 2% of Americans have this skill, and let's see if I remember right, Bach was one, Einstein was one and I know that the guy who wrote the script and stuff for the movie "Avatar" was one. (he made himself write the movie and stuff while he slept and the actual movie was not what he thought he wrote). I have a friend who has this skill and he says that sometimes he can't tell if he's dreaming or not lol. :P


    ---
    - Sent from my iPod touch using Tapatalk

  4. #4

    Default

    my psych class was talking about this the other day. turns out, when you're lucid dreaming, you're not actually *fully* asleep.
    you're asleep enough to be able to block out most/all outside interference, and that allows your still conscious mind to do... well, whatever it wants.
    it's very similar to a trance.
    it's also why you remember most lucid dreams- your mind is awake to store the memory of it in your brain, unlike REM where next to nothing gets permanently stored.

    i'm not really sure if this is the same thing, but i can sometimes just lay down and go into a really deep relaxation, to the point where somebody could pinch me and i wouldn't even feel it. (i would feel it, but it's kind of a removed feeling)
    when i'm in that kind of state, i can have the weirdest experiences. it's exactly like a lucid dream. it's great

  5. #5

    Default

    I also sometimes have the ability to realize I am in a dream and can take control of it, it hasnt happened for a long time though and never involved those types of things. However I often have dreams about being seen by different people with my diapers and those dreams are usually embarrassing and when I wake up I was glad it was just a dream. Having dreams like this make me fear of sleeping in the same room as someone as I may talk in my sleep.

  6. #6

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Chanch0 View Post
    No, I don't have any tips, but here's some fun facts for you, lucid dreaming is a pretty rare thing, I think its like 2% of Americans have this skill
    it happens to me like 2-3 times a month, so idk if i have the "skill." I heard that you can get better at it if you really try tho.

  7. #7

    Default

    If you really want to lucid dream I know a few sure fire ways

    If your over 21 : Stay awake at least 24 hours, If you like coffee drink lots it not only keeps you awake but helps with lucid dreaming later. After the 24 hour mark pick your alcohol of choice and get really drunk and fall to sleep, but make sure to set a alarm for 4-5 ( NO MORE! ) hours after you fall asleep, force yourself to wake up when it goes off and get up and about till your fully awake ( At least an hour usually, basically till your no longer tired ), then lay down and relax with your eyes closed, Valah! You can enter a dream state easy peasy and do whatever you want

    It works because, 24 without sleep starts to put you in alot of sleep debt, people who stay awake to long experience bad bad things like hallucinations and dream thoughts entering into there everyday waking state, so don't overdo it. add to that when you do go to sleep your mind now really really wants to dream since it hasn't ( people with a sleep debt enter a dream state faster whereas someone without it won't start dreaming for a while into the night ), but alcohol is a REM ( dream phase of sleep ) suppressor, so when you sleep it keeps you from dreaming, and once you wake up your mind will be pretty much starved for dreams, so you wake up completely ( so you won't fall asleep when you lay down ), and BAM! instant dream fun! :P

    If your under 21 you can try the same thing but without the alcohol, and if you find you have trouble, like you fall asleep instead of dreaming, have your hand holding something that will be loud if you let go / drop it, so that way if you would have fell asleep, and wasted your time, instead the noise just wakes you up and you can try again right away ENJOY FLYING WITH RAINBOW BUNNYS IN A CARROT FIGHTER JET

  8. #8

    Default

    Lucid dreaming is a very cool thing to say the least. When i was studying sleep this semester my lecturer told me about someone that utilised lucid dreaming to stop their bedwetting (yes, i did feel a little bit awkward in the class at that time). Basically, this particular girl hated wetting the bed and figured out that when she dreamed that she was going to the bathroom, she was wetting her bed. So, she took control of the dream where she needed to go to the bathroom and made it so there was always something in the way preventing her from going (i.e. someone else was using it or it was really dirty and not usable) and she stopped wetting the bed. So you can do some pretty cool things with lucid dreams. As said before, they aren't the norm in people however, you can train yourself to do it and it takes a long time to be able to achieve it. And a lot of people that only have lucid dreams often find themselves confused as to when they are dreaming and when they are awake.

    However, i would not recommend what sherbet has said if you want to experience it. Sleep deprivation is NEVER a good thing to try and mixing it with alcohol is not a smart thing to do either. Plus, alcohol is not a REM suppressor but rather, prevents the REM-off signal from occurring which means you have the REM neurons firing during NREM sleep. This causes what is known as night terrors and from the reports i have heard of these, are not a nice thing at all (my lecturer told me about someone's night terrors where their skin was being peeled off piece by piece and they could feel the pain of it). As a side note, sleep deprivation increases your risk of a psychotic episode which is not something that is smart to do.

    One thing i wanted to point out is that we cycle through NREM and REM sleep throughout the night with a REM cycle being the last one before we wake up. With REM sleep, our brain wave patterns (on an EEG) are actually very similar to that of when we are awake and our brains are far more active during this time then during NREM sleep (this has been shown on a functional MRI and other tests too). Main reason why we don't remember dreams from the other periods of REM that we experience during the night is because of the fact that the brain has more important things to remember then dreams (our brains are VERY resistant to form new memories and will do everything it can to prevent the process of forming a new memory as it is a very energy intensive process). So remembering dreams isn't really that important. Not to mention, during the night when we are cycling through REM and NREM, when we reach NREM sleep, there is cycling of neuronal activity between the cortical regions and the thalamus and therefore, a process such as memory formation is not an easy thing to do. Even if it was committed to short term memory, it would be forgot before we wake up as there is no 'reinforcing' of the dream because you aren't aware of what you are doing. This is different in people with lucid dreams. Because they are aware, they are able to remember the dreams more easily as the structures in the brain involved in memory can be accessed properly. The other reason why we normally don't remember our dreams when we wake up is because once we are awake, our brain is thinking about a whole range of things and receiving many different inputs that it has to now process and this causes you memory of the dream you just had to fade. If you really want to remember you dream, when you wake up, don't move or open your eyes or anything and try to think about what you dreamt about last night. This will help you to remember dreams better as you are not bombarding you brain with inputs from everything else.

    People who have lucid dreams, whilst they are in a trance like state, are still entering REM sleep and are not doing anything differently in their brain (in terms of visible functioning by imaging). This is the reason why some people that have lucid dreams, when they wake up can be temporarily paralysed (this is a natural thing that occurs to prevent us acting out our dreams during REM sleep but stops when we enter NREM sleep).

    That being said, i do have periods where i have had lucid dreams and can easily control aspects. However, lately because of everything going on (mainly my exams) i haven't been remembering dreams because my brain is more active trying to remember what it needs to for my exam. (a clear example of why we don't normally remember our dreams). There ar a whole range of things that you can try when you lucid dream. One of the things that i have heard of is if you don't like something, try and make yourself spin on the spot a couple of times and you will end up in a different place. I haven't tried this myself as normally, i can just change where i am or what I'm doing based on how I'm feeling. I would never use my dreams to do work though. It sounds like a good way to get things done but i go to sleep for exactly that. Not to mention my lecturer told me of a story about a guy that hated going to sleep because he would work all day, come home and go to sleep and then dream he was working all day in his dream. So basically, he was always working. Not something i want to end up doing.

  9. #9

    Default

    If memory serves, I have lucid dreams quite often. about once every couple weeks. I love them. I would like to know more about the "temporarily paralyzed" part though. That happens to me A LOT. It is absolutely terrifying. I actually made a post about this very thing on another thread the other day.

    What happens to me is, It will appear to me as though I am fully awake because I can see my room and nothing "dream-like" is occurring. However, my head..or at least my upper body feels completely paralyzed. This naturally freaks me the hell out. Especially because I am claustrophobic. So not being able to move is...Nightmarish. The more I try and get out of it, the more it resists and doesn't let me. Which then freaks me out more because I get upset that I am not able to wake up. I feel like its restraining me. The cruel trick is that I have to not struggle to get out of it. Which is REALLY hard when you are as upset as I am. It often makes me scared of sleeping.

    There have even been occasions where I get out of it, but because I am still extremely tired, I pass out again, and am put back into paralysis. I honestly don't understand why I suffer so much from this. I am one of the best sleepers I know. I sleep healthy hours, It is deep enough that I am never disturbed by outside influences, and I haven't had nightmares in..god knows how many years. So I don't get it. You seem to know a substantial amount about this stuff Zeek61, I would be very interested to know what you think might be going on with me. It would be very helpful.

  10. #10

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Zeek61 View Post
    Lucid dreaming is a very cool thing to say the least. When i was studying sleep this semester my lecturer told me about someone that utilised lucid dreaming to stop their bedwetting (yes, i did feel a little bit awkward in the class at that time). Basically, this particular girl hated wetting the bed and figured out that when she dreamed that she was going to the bathroom, she was wetting her bed. So, she took control of the dream where she needed to go to the bathroom and made it so there was always something in the way preventing her from going (i.e. someone else was using it or it was really dirty and not usable) and she stopped wetting the bed. So you can do some pretty cool things with lucid dreams. As said before, they aren't the norm in people however, you can train yourself to do it and it takes a long time to be able to achieve it. And a lot of people that only have lucid dreams often find themselves confused as to when they are dreaming and when they are awake.

    However, i would not recommend what sherbet has said if you want to experience it. Sleep deprivation is NEVER a good thing to try and mixing it with alcohol is not a smart thing to do either. Plus, alcohol is not a REM suppressor but rather, prevents the REM-off signal from occurring which means you have the REM neurons firing during NREM sleep. This causes what is known as night terrors and from the reports i have heard of these, are not a nice thing at all (my lecturer told me about someone's night terrors where their skin was being peeled off piece by piece and they could feel the pain of it). As a side note, sleep deprivation increases your risk of a psychotic episode which is not something that is smart to do.

    One thing i wanted to point out is that we cycle through NREM and REM sleep throughout the night with a REM cycle being the last one before we wake up. With REM sleep, our brain wave patterns (on an EEG) are actually very similar to that of when we are awake and our brains are far more active during this time then during NREM sleep (this has been shown on a functional MRI and other tests too). Main reason why we don't remember dreams from the other periods of REM that we experience during the night is because of the fact that the brain has more important things to remember then dreams (our brains are VERY resistant to form new memories and will do everything it can to prevent the process of forming a new memory as it is a very energy intensive process). So remembering dreams isn't really that important. Not to mention, during the night when we are cycling through REM and NREM, when we reach NREM sleep, there is cycling of neuronal activity between the cortical regions and the thalamus and therefore, a process such as memory formation is not an easy thing to do. Even if it was committed to short term memory, it would be forgot before we wake up as there is no 'reinforcing' of the dream because you aren't aware of what you are doing. This is different in people with lucid dreams. Because they are aware, they are able to remember the dreams more easily as the structures in the brain involved in memory can be accessed properly. The other reason why we normally don't remember our dreams when we wake up is because once we are awake, our brain is thinking about a whole range of things and receiving many different inputs that it has to now process and this causes you memory of the dream you just had to fade. If you really want to remember you dream, when you wake up, don't move or open your eyes or anything and try to think about what you dreamt about last night. This will help you to remember dreams better as you are not bombarding you brain with inputs from everything else.

    People who have lucid dreams, whilst they are in a trance like state, are still entering REM sleep and are not doing anything differently in their brain (in terms of visible functioning by imaging). This is the reason why some people that have lucid dreams, when they wake up can be temporarily paralysed (this is a natural thing that occurs to prevent us acting out our dreams during REM sleep but stops when we enter NREM sleep).

    That being said, i do have periods where i have had lucid dreams and can easily control aspects. However, lately because of everything going on (mainly my exams) i haven't been remembering dreams because my brain is more active trying to remember what it needs to for my exam. (a clear example of why we don't normally remember our dreams). There ar a whole range of things that you can try when you lucid dream. One of the things that i have heard of is if you don't like something, try and make yourself spin on the spot a couple of times and you will end up in a different place. I haven't tried this myself as normally, i can just change where i am or what I'm doing based on how I'm feeling. I would never use my dreams to do work though. It sounds like a good way to get things done but i go to sleep for exactly that. Not to mention my lecturer told me of a story about a guy that hated going to sleep because he would work all day, come home and go to sleep and then dream he was working all day in his dream. So basically, he was always working. Not something i want to end up doing.
    The only bad thing sleep deprivation causes is extreme tiredness, and things associated with it such as it not being a good idea to drive, its a real common misconception and a person did a study of this to prove that it has little short term effects besides concentration and memory and no long term effects on health or mental state. Also people are way to caught up, even in scientific circles, on dreams and brain-waves, when not realizing the chemical aspect of it. Alcohol IS a REM suppresant, and if taken when one should be having an REM cycle it will inhibit it and cause REM rebound almost instantly afterwards, and its not just REM and brainwaves here, alcohol inhibits the release of chemicals such as serotonin and increases, though indirectly, choleric activity in the mind thus keeping one from not only dreaming, but being concsious during when one would dream.

    The main CHEMICAL and not "brainwave" cause of sleep is inhibition of choleric chemicals and increase of serotonic and dopamine ones, as one looses sleep, say through deprivation, the mind has no way to continue to produce these natural cholerics and thus has an anti-choleric effect, which itself is the main cause of the inner sensory perceptions of sleep such as sight and hearing and whatever. If you look up studys on chemical depletion of dopamine you'll see that it causes hallucinations exactly akin to extreme sleep deprivation or what one might get in a half sleep half awake state, and even more so if you look at the effects of anti-chollerics chemicals, they cause one to enter a delerious state of dreaming while awake. of course non of these should ever ever be tried but thats just showing that theres more to sleep than simple "brain-waves" and "brain-wave cycles". You actually said "are brain waves are similair in dreams as when we are awake" and this is true, but obviously were not in a same state of mind are we? So there must be something else going on, and there is. And you say that people who have lucid dreams are not showing any different REM brain waves then normal sleep, which is true, but when one has REM rebound the anti-choleric aspect shows it self in the thalamus, thus increasing vividity of imagination and creating a dreamscape, but not inhibiting serotonin or dopamine recepters in the same area thus leaving one concious while one dreams and being able to form working memories of the events.

    So is sleep deprivation bad? No, its a common misconception, and there are many studies on this, tho chronically it can effect health or in excess it can effect ones acute homeostasis and health but that is usually regained after a good nights rest. As long as one doesn't drive or have obligations there is no harm in it. As for alcohol consumption, of course thats bad for you, but the dangers and health risks are well known for the most part.

    ---------- Post added at 02:06 ---------- Previous post was at 02:04 ----------



    Quote Originally Posted by BabyBlue26 View Post
    If memory serves, I have lucid dreams quite often. about once every couple weeks. I love them. I would like to know more about the "temporarily paralyzed" part though. That happens to me A LOT. It is absolutely terrifying. I actually made a post about this very thing on another thread the other day.

    What happens to me is, It will appear to me as though I am fully awake because I can see my room and nothing "dream-like" is occurring. However, my head..or at least my upper body feels completely paralyzed. This naturally freaks me the hell out. Especially because I am claustrophobic. So not being able to move is...Nightmarish. The more I try and get out of it, the more it resists and doesn't let me. Which then freaks me out more because I get upset that I am not able to wake up. I feel like its restraining me. The cruel trick is that I have to not struggle to get out of it. Which is REALLY hard when you are as upset as I am. It often makes me scared of sleeping.

    There have even been occasions where I get out of it, but because I am still extremely tired, I pass out again, and am put back into paralysis. I honestly don't understand why I suffer so much from this. I am one of the best sleepers I know. I sleep healthy hours, It is deep enough that I am never disturbed by outside influences, and I haven't had nightmares in..god knows how many years. So I don't get it. You seem to know a substantial amount about this stuff Zeek61, I would be very interested to know what you think might be going on with me. It would be very helpful.
    Your a brave man :0 i've only had sleep paralysis happen to me once and I was terrified Being closterphobic like you said you are, I can't even imagine D:

Similar Threads

  1. Dreaming of wearing?
    By modeltoy1 in forum Diaper Talk
    Replies: 73
    Last Post: 12-Aug-2010, 07:33
  2. Dreaming of Siblings in diapers
    By aielen in forum Diaper Talk
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 31-Aug-2009, 21:53
  3. Lucid Dreaming
    By jasonthebeast in forum Off-topic
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 16-Jul-2008, 17:55

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
ADISC.org - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community.
ADISC.org is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.