Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Housemates, cloth nappies, eco-friendliness and laundry...

  1. #1

    Default Housemates, cloth nappies, eco-friendliness and laundry...

    So I share a house with someone who doesn't know I'm AB. We have our own washing machine, and I'm getting to the end of my current nappy stash. I'd love to try cloth diapers because they're more eco friendly, but I don't want to be That Guy - you know, the perv who does horrible things while their housemates are out and leaves the place in a state that would freak them out if they knew. (I just want to be a responsible and mature perv )

    I already know I'd have to keep nappies in a wet bucket if I wanted to wait and wash a load all at once - that's a bridge I'll cross when I come to it since I don't know how often I'd wear really. But the big thing for me is, if I have to do nappy washes, how do I make sure the washing machine is hygienic and clean afterwards so we can still wash things like tea towels that come into contact with food? I'd definitely be using liners if I was going to mess, because ew, quite frankly - is the wash itself enough to clean things through if you're not washing actual poop off things, or should I run the machine empty/wash something I don't care about afterwards to be sure?

    And then of course I feel guilty because washing one nappy at a time or running the machine twice is hardly any greener than disposables... argh! Thoughts, anyone?

  2. #2

    Default

    I don't think anyone out there bothers running the machine twice to clean it after. Running hot wash, hot rinse the hot dry after should be enough to make everything sanitary. If you want waste less energy you can throw in some stuff like your shower curtain, bath mat and things that don't need to be that clean in with your couple of diapers.

    I have heard numerous debates on how green cloth is. The current consensus is that they are about even once you take water and energy use into account. Not sure if they do the calculation on a per diaper basis or from birth to potty training since cloth diapered babies potty train faster.

  3. #3

    Default

    Cloth is not as big a deal as it seems. You do not need to keep them in a wet pail. I keep mine in a dry pail I use an odor guard liner to line the pail. I wash them once a week I have to go to a laundromat to do it so you have it a bit easier. Mine are All in ones so I have to be careful with drying but here is how I wash them. I put them in the washer and wash them on Hot with bleach and detergent (many cloth diaper people frown on bleach but I do it and it works). After the first wash I run the washer again this gives them a god rinse.
    I dry the AIO's on the lowest setting for 10-15 mins to fluff them it keeps them from being as stiff. The liners I dry with my towels and sheets on hot.

    As for sanitizing the machine the bleach does that and if you put the towels in the dryer that sanitizes them so no worries. If you want to forgo the bleach with your diapers I would run an empty load with hot and bleach if you are worried about a dirty machine (or do a load of whites with bleach if you don't want to waste a load.)
    As for eco friendliness the debate suggests it is close to a push even with the multiple washes but money wise I can do 2 loads at the laundromat for a dollar and they are making money so a weeks worth of diapers would cost you less than $1 to maintain and after a few months you would have recouped the cost of the diapers.

    If you have plastic pants I would just hand wash them in the sink washer/dryers ruin them fast.

  4. #4

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by MasterPython View Post
    I don't think anyone out there bothers running the machine twice to clean it after. Running hot wash, hot rinse the hot dry after should be enough to make everything sanitary. If you want waste less energy you can throw in some stuff like your shower curtain, bath mat and things that don't need to be that clean in with your couple of diapers.

    I have heard numerous debates on how green cloth is. The current consensus is that they are about even once you take water and energy use into account. Not sure if they do the calculation on a per diaper basis or from birth to potty training since cloth diapered babies potty train faster.
    Actually, that is incorrect. Some groups called into question the study you're thinking of, so the UK Environment Agency went back and revisited their work.

    http://publications.environment-agen...08BOIR-E-E.pdf

    The quick one-sentence summary is that, figuring a kid in diapers full-time for 2.5 years, cloth was up to 40 percent less impactful. The big differences were in laundering choices and line-drying, but they did account for laundry machines, transport, water use, energy use, et cetera. It's a pretty good document, actually.

    As for cloth, it's easy to wash. Just wash on a hot wash/cold rinse, and there's no need to do any additional sterilization to the machine, as if you wash on hot it'll kill anything growing on the diapers anyway. If you're only washing one or two at a time, wash them with your towels, and again, use a hot wash/cold rinse. It'll be fine.

  5. #5

    Default

    I'd agree that a washing machine should not need to be sanitized after washing diapers. I tend not to mess cloth diapers (don't like the cleanup or stains, which seem impossible to remove), but I'd say that a hot wash would be appropriate for sanitization purposes. However, you definitely shouldn't put a fully messed diaper directly in the washer. The solids need to be rinsed off beforehand (preferably in the toilet). I've heard that the liners you mentioned can help reduce work when rinsing.

    Keep in mind that the longer you leave them in the pail, the harder it will be to get stains or smells out. I personally prefer not letting diapers sit for more than 2 days, 3 max, but going longer is not unheard of.

    Also, whether a wet pail is necessary is debatable. From what I've read about "modern" cloth diapering, dry pail is the way to go and that is what I do. It uses less water and is easier to carry to the washing machine. A Google search should turn up several discussions on this.

    Yes, chlorine bleach works for removing stains. But it does break down the cloth fibers faster. Ever have a T-shirt start to develop holes after being bleached one too many times? Same concept. If you must use a bleach, use a non-chlorine bleach with little to no additives, like Oxo-Brite (sodium percarbonate). Detergent selection can be important, too. The usual stuff like Tide tends to have additives that remain in the cloth even after rinsing, giving rise to build-up that can result in odd smells, rashes, or even reduced absorbency. I use Allens Naturally and haven't had a problem. Rockin' Green detergent also seems highly reviewed, but I haven't tried it yet.

    I agree that washing only one or two diapers at a time can be wasteful. When I was doing full-time cloth, I only had access to a commercial washer with one water level setting: full. So I timed my washing days and diaper usage to take advantage of the full capacity of the machine. If you have a washer with several water level settings (or even an HE machine that automatically sets the water level) you can get away with washing fewer diapers without being too wasteful.

    One thing on eco-friendliness: energy comparisons of disposable vs. cloth aside, another huge consideration is that by using cloth, there will be much less waste headed towards the landfill. And frankly, human waste (feces especially) should not be rotting in a landfill where it is basically hazardous waste that can spread disease if the landfill is not properly constructed/maintained and is allowing leachate to penetrate into the soil and, eventually, the water table. A septic tank or preferably a water treatment plant (which is where the water from toilets and washing machines will end up) is a much better place to send human waste.

  6. #6

    Default

    Remember that urine comes out sterile, so you don't need to worry, especially if you thoroughly rinse your diapers before washing. I rinse mine out when I take my shower. What you should know is that drying them may take two runs in the dryer, as they retain water like crazy. Keeping all of this from a room mate might be difficult.

  7. #7

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy View Post
    Remember that urine comes out sterile, so you don't need to worry, especially if you thoroughly rinse your diapers before washing. I rinse mine out when I take my shower. What you should know is that drying them may take two runs in the dryer, as they retain water like crazy. Keeping all of this from a room mate might be difficult.
    My housemate (not roommate) is the kind of person who doesn't even notice laundry when it's hanging up. If I hide it on the airer behind a towel he'll either not see it or not care what it is. And I wouldn't mind if he did find out, I don't think he'd judge, I just don't want to do the whole So I Have Something To Tell You speech.



    Quote Originally Posted by Tygon View Post
    One thing on eco-friendliness: energy comparisons of disposable vs. cloth aside, another huge consideration is that by using cloth, there will be much less waste headed towards the landfill.
    Well yeah, that was where I was coming from really...



    Quote Originally Posted by Tygon View Post
    And frankly, human waste (feces especially) should not be rotting in a landfill where it is basically hazardous waste that can spread disease if the landfill is not properly constructed/maintained and is allowing leachate to penetrate into the soil and, eventually, the water table. A septic tank or preferably a water treatment plant (which is where the water from toilets and washing machines will end up) is a much better place to send human waste.
    AGH. Now I feel even guiltier :/ I hope my local landfill isn't that badly maintained...

Similar Threads

  1. Buying diapers when living with housemates
    By eeyore in forum Diaper Talk
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 02-Feb-2011, 07:39
  2. Nappies in the UK
    By boydiaperboy in forum Diaper Talk
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 01-Dec-2010, 23:20
  3. Other uses for nappies
    By Starchild in forum Diaper Talk
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 27-Nov-2010, 23:57
  4. nappies & fun
    By funkybeanie in forum Computers & Gaming
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 31-Dec-2008, 18:19

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
ADISC.org - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community.
ADISC.org is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.