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Thread: ""If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything."

  1. #1
    DrunknFox

    Default ""If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything."

    "If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything."
    — Mark Twain

    Would you agree with Mark Twain's philosophy?
    Think about it...

    What is your opinion?

  2. #2

    Default

    Radical Honesty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    It's a good idea but awfully hard if not impossible to do. There will be many times where you want and even perhaps need to lie.

    In the first season of Lie To Me Eli Loker is partaking in radical honest. telling the truth 100% and not even hiding it. For instance if I was partaking in it and I thought this topic was dumb I would be "forced" to tell you this topic sucks. Since if I withheld that, its with holding the truth and breaking "Radical Honesty."

  3. #3
    StefanHasDiapees

    Default

    I was wondering which of the two 'authors' of this quote you were going to use; Mark Twain or Hunter S. Thompson.

    Twain was using it more as a general idea, and possibly with his tounge in his cheek. He was famous for his one-liners.

    Thompson, however, used it as a daily affirmation. Oh, he would lie, all right... he'd lie for fun, or to set you up for a prank. But when it came to reporting, legal issues, relationships, etc., he honestly believed it's best to never 'pad' the truth or build a card-house of lies, because in his heart, he was lazy. He knew he would never bother to remember lies-upon-lies well enough to defend himself, so when it came to major issues, he told the truth.

    Usually, it's just plain easier.

  4. #4

    Default

    Complete and utter honesty is rarely a good idea. Two of the things greasing the cogs of civilization are white lies and lies of omission. I would agree, in general, that honesty is a good policy. There are some things, however, which are both blatantly obvious and no one's business, things such as precisely why I was transferred to Boston, precisely what I thought of my best friend's ex-fiancée, et cetera. It was quite clear to anyone who looked that I'd PCSed to Boston much sooner than usual, but with the exception of my direct superior and CO, it wasn't any of their business. The truth would do them no good and possibly harm me. In the case of the fiancée, clearly my friend thought a great deal of her; I didn't. Rather than offend the both of them, I chose instead to remain silent and distant. Now that he's seen she wasn't quite what he thought she was, it would only hurt him further to point out what I had thought of her, and I choose not to hurt him, so again I remain mostly silent.

    TLDR; total and utter truth == BAD

  5. #5

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by StefanHasDiapees View Post
    I was wondering which of the two 'authors' of this quote you were going to use; Mark Twain or Hunter S. Thompson.

    Twain was using it more as a general idea, and possibly with his tounge in his cheek. He was famous for his one-liners.

    Thompson, however, used it as a daily affirmation. Oh, he would lie, all right... he'd lie for fun, or to set you up for a prank. But when it came to reporting, legal issues, relationships, etc., he honestly believed it's best to never 'pad' the truth or build a card-house of lies, because in his heart, he was lazy. He knew he would never bother to remember lies-upon-lies well enough to defend himself, so when it came to major issues, he told the truth.

    Usually, it's just plain easier.
    Those who have seen me around the boards for long enough realize that I largely subscribe to a similar philosophy. I discovered very early that I'm quite bad at lying, and accordingly, I'd be double punished, once for whatever thing I had done wrong in the first place and again for lying about it. I actually spent the better part of third grade grounded because of the double-whammy punishments.

    That said, there are times when I will opt to keep the fuck quiet instead. Sometimes the power of omission is the greatest form of obfuscation.

    In keeping with the topic, let us not forget my favorite Twain quote: "get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please."

  6. #6
    Butterfly Mage

    Default

    I generally find that in situations where I don't want to tell the truth, I simply say nothing. One of my beliefs as a Wiccan (and perhaps not every Wiccan would agree) is that the phrase "so mote it be" depends on personal honesty and integrity. If I am doing a magical working and I utter my intent, part of it becoming reality is the power of my word. If I make it a lifestyle to have no truth in my words, then the power of my spoken word would be diminished.

  7. #7

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by xbabyx View Post
    That said, there are times when I will opt to keep the fuck quiet instead. Sometimes the power of omission is the greatest form of obfuscation.
    This.

    It's so much easier to be 100% honest while leaving out key context than it is to spin a web of lies. Fact is, most people are going to contradict themselves with a web of lies, whereas just omitting details can achieve nearly as much with much less risk.


    That said, I personally have a strong aversion to misrepresenting reality, so I generally try not only to be honest, but to say the whole truth.

  8. #8
    Butterfly Mage

    Default

    I agree. It is better to lie by omission than to directly tell a falsehood.

    "I saw your car in the parking lot". Ooops, did I not mention that it was on fire when I saw it? You didn't ASK me if it was intact!

  9. #9

    Default

    I regard direct lies as unparalleled act of creation. For them to work, you essentially have to create an entire fictional world, which is consistent in every detail, to the second, third or fourth degree. It's nearly impossible to get this right. Harnessing omission to make people's presuppositions work for you is a much more effective strategy. You'd think by now that parents would realise that they need to teach their children that deception is wrong, not merely telling direct lies.

    But yes, perfect truth is not a good idea. Sometimes, a lie helps lubricate awkward situations. My favourite example: what is the appropriate response for man when a woman asks him "do I look fat in this?" - run away screaming.

  10. #10

    Default

    I prefer to tell lies that disolve over time if I do in fact need to lie. This means I only need to remember it for a shorter period of time before it gets forgotten as one of the smaller details. I also happen to have a very good memory, especially for things I deem important.

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