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Thread: A Few Things To Ponder.

  1. #1

    Question A Few Things To Ponder.

    First off, a note to the mods. Yes, this is about a book and normally, as such, it would be posted under a bookish section. However, I really feel that this needs to be placed in the Mature section because, although i am pointing out a book, what i'm really trying to talk about is the idea behind it.

    I've recently read a book called Unwind by Neal Shusterman. I can tell you right now that, while it might not be one of the most powerful books I've read, it is one that had gained a great portion of my limited attention span as of late.
    The book is an amazing blend of action and psychological questions. I'm going to let this fan-made trailer explain the premise of the book because...well it looks pretty cool. [The movie of this book is actually in the starting stages. They're looking for cast and crew at the moment.]


    What is Life worth?

    ~*~*~*~
    Read the book and tell me what you think. Or, if you've read the book skip right to step two and post below.

    ---------- Post added at 05:36 PM ---------- Previous post was at 05:12 PM ----------

    I just found a good review on Shusterman's site and i thought i'd post it.

  2. #2

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    Life, in itself, is worth nothing. You live and you die. It's what you do in your life that matters, and the legacy you may leave behind (either with the world or with a few people) after you've left this world.

    I don't think I'm worth much, and I don't think I necessarily will be. What I do, know, however, is that my life has to be worth something, because I've socialized with people and spoken my thoughts. And as long as I can do that, that's all my life needs to be worth.

    So, uhhh... Yeah. I guess the concept of the biological life cycle means jack to me, personally. The concept of 'life' as contact to the outside world is much more important than that. (I'm kind of stupid and a bit melancholy today. Derp.)

  3. #3

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    Well I haven't read it but it does sound like a interesting concept for a book. Hopefully the writing is as good as the plot itself.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shukkume View Post
    Life, in itself, is worth nothing. You live and you die. It's what you do in your life that matters, and the legacy you may leave behind (either with the world or with a few people) after you've left this world.

    I don't think I'm worth much, and I don't think I necessarily will be. What I do, know, however, is that my life has to be worth something, because I've socialized with people and spoken my thoughts. And as long as I can do that, that's all my life needs to be worth.

    So, uhhh... Yeah. I guess the concept of the biological life cycle means jack to me, personally. The concept of 'life' as contact to the outside world is much more important than that. (I'm kind of stupid and a bit melancholy today. Derp.)
    This. Also, the entire point of the book throws me through a loop. What, the pro-lifers actually agreed that 13-18 year-olds (who stand FAR away from the "where does 'life' begin" debate) to be completely mutilated because their parents are pricks said so? Big time BS, I can't even ignore the point long enough to analyze the book's message. This setting, where the author wants us to ask ourselves the questions he wants us to, is absurd.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alphacore View Post
    This. Also, the entire point of the book throws me through a loop. What, the pro-lifers actually agreed that 13-18 year-olds (who stand FAR away from the "where does 'life' begin" debate) to be completely mutilated because their parents are pricks said so? Big time BS, I can't even ignore the point long enough to analyze the book's message. This setting, where the author wants us to ask ourselves the questions he wants us to, is absurd.
    Have you read the book? If you have, i'm sorry to say but (imo) you missed a huge point. He clearly shows the reader time and time again how the idea of unwinding your child has become socially acceptable by the people of that age; they simply don't see it as 'death'. The fact that you see it as something "prickish" doesn't mean that the characters in his book do. You have to =>let go<= of your own reality when you read a book like this, otherwise you'll never get the point it's trying to make. Now, i'm not saying that you should take everything a book shoves on you at face value (god knows that be a horrible thing to do) but give it a chance.
    Another thing, and i'm not meaning to bash you...just point things out, the author explains why the pro-life and pro-choice factions came together under the agreement. It's in a scene with the Admiral in the camp (i'm also brining up stuff that I've read in some interviews with him). They accepted the agreement because each side was pretty much at a stalemate (it also being a 3 sided war). They accepted the agreement because it would simply end the war.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alphacore View Post
    This. Also, the entire point of the book throws me through a loop. What, the pro-lifers actually agreed that 13-18 year-olds (who stand FAR away from the "where does 'life' begin" debate) to be completely mutilated because their parents are pricks said so? Big time BS, I can't even ignore the point long enough to analyze the book's message. This setting, where the author wants us to ask ourselves the questions he wants us to, is absurd.
    Similar issue. While I might give the book a try, I find it difficult to imagine a world where killing a foetus that has no feeling, no memories, and can't even survive with the aid of technology is deemed wrong, however parents can just kill their kids when they decide they aren't exactly what they wanted. Even worse, one of the characters is being killed off because of "budget cuts". Really? The government now kills people when they don't have enough money?

    An interesting dystopian concept, but poorly constructed. A re-write in which this "future" worked the same way, but the exact reasons that this is suddenly allowed are left to the reader to imagine, along with a different origin story for the girl, and the book would be worth reading.

  7. #7

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    It's seems to me that the "suspension of belief" the author expects you to make is far to much of a leap. At least for me. The thing that most stands out is the fact one of the main characters is chosen to be unwound because his parent's are basically fed up with him (trouble-maker and what-not). Another problem is that the whole program was generally accepted right at it's conception. I don't care how war-weary these people are, nothing like that passes without someone in the room calling foul.

  8. #8

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    I disagree. Look at Ender's Game, the same large jump is required of the reader at the very start of the novel. How could it possibly be conceivable that children are forced into the military at the age of 6 and shown combat? Such a thing in today's world would be outrageous. Maybe that doesn't convince you though, what about Conde's book The Religion, he asks you to believe that a cult of Voodoo has resorted to killing their own children as a sacrifice to appease gods. Isn't that like the jump that this book is making you take? Tithing after all is the same thing in a different costume.
    All books are illogical and inconceivable anything but would be boring to read. We ALL go through life every day; we wake up, brush our teeth, take a shower, go to school (or work), and repeat the next day. What would be the fun in reading that? There wouldn't be. Every author asks the reader to make a compromise, asks them "Hey, just believe this one thing for me, just for a little while." And we have to, as readers.

  9. #9

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    Alright, I'll give you that point. I haven't read The Religion but Ender's Game is a favorite of mine. I was going to state how humanity was pushed to a near extinction event pushed them into a desperate act, training children to be commanders. However, I guess that's your point as well.

    As a rebuttal: In Ender's Game the issue was pushed that the buggers would have wiped humanity out if not for great commanders. While in Unwind it's just one country that got tired of fighting. A sense of collectivism caused the action in the former, while a sense of.......'weariness'? caused the latter.

  10. #10

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    Isn't it still a sense of collectivism that brought them together coupled with the weariness (as we'll call it)? After all, it was a Civil War in America and even though we all have our differences and dislikes (clearly seen on the television today) we're still proud to say that we are "One Nation Under God, Indivisible..." Even though they were at war, everyone was still an American.
    Last edited by Kyler; 13-Jan-2011 at 00:42. Reason: Grammar

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