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Thread: Stain on plastic pants

  1. #1

    Default Stain on plastic pants

    Hi all. I found a bargain at a local thrift store and scored a few cases of Promise diapers dirt cheap ($4 a pack). I've been wearing them constantly with plastic pants. The diapers have a faint print along the wetness indicator that appears to be a lot number and size info. I've found that the ink is staining my nice white and clear plastic pants so that there is now an unsightly grey stain in the front . I tried using a little rubbing alcohol, but the stain won't come out. Anyone have any ideas?

  2. #2

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    Acetone is usually good for removing ink stains, depending on what kind of ink. So maybe nail polish remover? I would test it out on an inconspicuous part of the pants if possible since acetone might damage the plastic.

  3. #3

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    Harsh chemicals (Bleach, rubbing alcohol, acetone, nail polish remover, goof off, etc.) will damage your plastic pants. The only effective method I've found for safely removing stains from plastic pants is sunshine/sunlight. Of course this method requires that you hang them (inside out) on a clothes-line, and in winter it is really difficult to get enough UV rays to do the job. I usually just rotate through the same 3-4 pairs of plastic pants for the winter and any long-term stains remain until I start to dry things on the line again.

    Don't think I've experienced stains on plastic pants from the disposable adult diapers I was wearing underneath.

  4. #4

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    I have gotten stains on plastic pants before from diapers. They didn't come out.

    And DO NOT use acetone, it will destroy the plastic, that is a horrible idea. That shit strips paints and oils off of surfaces, what do you think it would do to soft plastic :p

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Diapered Rabbit View Post
    Harsh chemicals (Bleach, rubbing alcohol, acetone, nail polish remover, goof off, etc.) will damage your plastic pants. The only effective method I've found for safely removing stains from plastic pants is sunshine/sunlight. Of course this method requires that you hang them (inside out) on a clothes-line, and in winter it is really difficult to get enough UV rays to do the job. I usually just rotate through the same 3-4 pairs of plastic pants for the winter and any long-term stains remain until I start to dry things on the line again.

    Don't think I've experienced stains on plastic pants from the disposable adult diapers I was wearing underneath.
    I would assume that if UV + heat are ways of removing ink stains then a UV lamp and an airing cupboard might be equivalent to direct sunlight, assuming PVC a wash in a weak alkali (try a dilute Sodium bicarbonate solution)/acid (try diluted vinegar) solution might work being weakly alkali/acidic they won't damage the plastic chemically at low temperatures, and I know window cleaners don't damage uPVC but you might want to test it first on an unimportant area

  6. #6
    WarrenW

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    If soap and water does not remove the stain u will probably wreck the pants putting any type of plastic cleaner on them.

  7. #7

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    Since the stain did not respond to alcohol, you might want to try a hydrogen peroxide bleach treatment. Cover the stained area with a white cloth soaked in a 3% solution of hydrogen peroxide and leave from 30 minutes to overnight. Remove the cloth and gently wipe the area with a mild soap and water solution. Substances such as oil paint, ink, tar, grease, ointment and cosmetics can often be removed with synthetic turpentine or mineral spirits.

    When using solvents suggested in above (turpentine or mineral spirits) use only in a well- ventilated room and avoid breathing fumes or getting on your skin. Be sure there is no flame, spark, pilot light, or cigarette in area, as they are flammable. Air out any cloths or rags used, to evaporate the solvent before disposing. I hope this helps, good luck.

  8. #8

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    If alcohol didn't remove the stain then its in the plastic. The only way to remove it is to remove some of the plastic. So whatever you use, it's going to be eating some of the plastic.

    If the pants are thick enough that may not be a big deal, but if they're thin it could make a hole or soft spot.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarKid View Post

    And DO NOT use acetone, it will destroy the plastic, that is a horrible idea. That shit strips paints and oils off of surfaces, what do you think it would do to soft plastic :p
    Yes, I suggested acetone may end up damaging the plastic, depending on what kind of plastic it is (I don't really know).

    In the lab, I clean goggles (plastic) all the time with acetone and we always store acetone and other cleaning solvents in plastic wash bottles for easy dispensing. However, I would not use acetone on the hard plastic surface of the portable glove box. It depends on what kind of polymer the plastic is made of, and whether it's high-density or low-density.

  10. #10

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    Thanks for all the great suggestions! I am concerned about acetone, but will try it on a small spot to see if the pants tolerate (btw I work in a lab too!). I also like the idea of Hydrogen Peroxide to bleach it out. UV sounds good too. I'll try each and let you know what works. Thanks All!!!!

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