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Thread: OS systems

  1. #1

    Default OS systems

    What OS system (linux) Would make good use of learning the os system?

  2. #2
    Butterfly Mage

    Default

    I'm not sure I understand the question. But I'll give it a shot for answering what I think you're answering.

    Windows is more of a utilitarian operating system. The source code is 100% hidden from the user. So it's pretty hard to learn about Windows without working for Microsoft.

    The Apple OS is even more locked down than Windows.

    Linux is an open-source operating system. The source code is visible to the user. The OS is close to free. (When you buy Red Hat Linux, for example, the $39.99 price mostly covers the packaging and advertising).

    Sun Solaris is another open-source operating system. The source code is visible to the user. The OS is free. I don't think you can buy it in stores. It has to be downloaded from Sun Microsystems.

  3. #3

    Default

    I'm going to go with Butterfly Mage's idea of what your question is and say this:

    The Mac is like a tricycle, or bike with training wheels. It gets you ready for an OS by not letting you fall, by keeping you upright. It's best for those who have no idea what they are doing.

    Windows is like a dirtbike, if you will. You can fall on it. You can crash and burn, and even die on it. But by keeping your head straight and knowing what you are doing, you can ride it safely, while still doing your own thing, whether it is a wheelie, or just riding the speed limit down the freeway.

    Now... Linux. Linux is like a private jet. It is yours. You can do with it what you will. It is 100% up to you on what happens. You can catch fire and fly into the ground if you're not being careful. But, with practice, you can fly it easily while still having fun.

  4. #4

    Default

    It sounds to me like your wondering what distribution of Linux is the easiest to learn. I would say the easiest to learn would be Ubuntu; it has a very good GUI (Graphical User Interface), and somewhat resembles Windows which is what most people are used to.

    Ubuntu homepage | Ubuntu

  5. #5

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by KuroMiles View Post
    I'm going to go with Butterfly Mage's idea of what your question is and say this:

    The Mac is like a tricycle, or bike with training wheels. It gets you ready for an OS by not letting you fall, by keeping you upright. It's best for those who have no idea what they are doing.

    Windows is like a dirtbike, if you will. You can fall on it. You can crash and burn, and even die on it. But by keeping your head straight and knowing what you are doing, you can ride it safely, while still doing your own thing, whether it is a wheelie, or just riding the speed limit down the freeway.

    Now... Linux. Linux is like a private jet. It is yours. You can do with it what you will. It is 100% up to you on what happens. You can catch fire and fly into the ground if you're not being careful. But, with practice, you can fly it easily while still having fun.
    Your analogies are incorrect. In particular, OS X--having a Mach kernel and POSIX-compliant "stuff" floating around, can be the experience you desire. It can be a tricycle, but only if you know The Apple Way To Do Things. I don't know all these ways, and am an old *NIX-head, so I take it to the terminal and it turns into a fighter jet. That can do mach 8. But it's in a canard configuration, so it's ... "intricate" at times.

    Integration is where it's really at. For instance, on the developer side, look at the Sparkle Framework. It's a pretty bad-ass way of going to do version checking and seeing if your running program is current.



    Quote Originally Posted by Valerye View Post
    What OS system (linux) Would make good use of learning the os system?
    Depends what your goal is. System V compliance? GNU filesystem and layout? Other stuff?

    Either way, you can't go wrong with Slackware. With no X installed. And CSH or TCSH installed. And sed and awk and vi and vim (it can handle larger files than vi).

    As for the rest ... go to it.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by h3g3l View Post
    Your analogies are incorrect.
    Incredibly incorrect :-/

    It always annoys me that people that are ignorant on topic ${x} always seem to want to speak about it as if they're knowledgeable. It's very misleading.

    I use OS X (Panther and up), Windows (everything but ME and Vista which I've used rarely), various Linux distros, and various versions of Solaris.

    My use of OS X started as an experiment on my part but has become my operating system of choice. I use the others because I need to for work. I use OS X, because it gets most of my jobs done with the least amount of hassle on my part while still allowing me the flexibility to go "fighter jet" as h3g3l put it.

    As far as learning how the OS works, get a linux distro. Lots of exposure... lots of books about it... transparent (open source)... and free. You don't need to be stuck on the command line to figure linux out, so I'd get one of the "easier" distros like Ubuntu. You're free to hit the command line whenever you need and fiddle with configuration as much as you like.

    But, as has been said, not sure exactly what you're after... or the depth you're wanting to go either.

  7. #7

    Default

    as said, mac -yer not gonna get anywhere windows- simple enough Linux- anything
    now for me windows works because i like how many programs and such not to mention hacking is easy if your into that, now mac i love the speed i love hwo it simplistic it is, HATE how expensive XDD

  8. #8

    Default

    If your looking to learn about Linux with a view to working with it in enterprise environments in the future, I'd suggest Fedora. Redhat tend to use Fedora as an incubator of sorts for possible future enhancements to Redhat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), which is typically the distro of choice for the bigger companies. And as Fedora's a free download and pretty easy to get going (it's available as a live CD, so you can use it without having to setup dual booting or replace your existing OS) I think it makes for a good introduction to the world of corporate Linux.

    Personally my day job involves maintaining a fair sized, geographically distributed parallel processing system running on RHEL servers - currently around 60 odd - for users spread across 3 continents. I've done this type of thing for a few large companies (three of them in 100'000+ employee range), and RHEL has consistently been the preferred distro Linux, followed by SUSE.

    Hope this helps

  9. #9

    Default

    Sorry, Valerye. I tried to be quiet, but I have to say it....
    Saying "OS systems" is a bit redundant. That's like saying "operating system systems".

    Anyway, I would say to start with Ubuntu. It has a large userbase, so it shouldn't be too hard to find help if you run into any problems.

  10. #10

    Default

    i can only say i've tried xandros, Solaris, ubuntu 9.X and 10.x.
    Xandros (or atleast the version I had) is a very basic and limiting operating system, the interface is an active menu desktop and it also has networking trouble I'd steer well clear, although it'd be ok to give to children because it is unbreakable.
    Solaris and 9.x are like xp in terms of overall appearance, very flat graphics start bar (at the top though) both come with a very similar software (fire fox, Open Office, basic games, a music player and computer utilities.
    Finaly ubuntu 10.x, I love tis system very usre friendly instead of a start menu you have a google desktop style side bar, chocked with preloaded goodies, and some how I could still install it onto a 2GB flash drive making it very fast, I'd ssay even with a few months of use ti would still beat a fresh copy of windows with one hand tied behind it's back.

    Hope this helps

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