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Thread: Questions concerning economical heating.

  1. #1

    Default Questions concerning economical heating.

    Seeing as I am now unemployed, and I can't afford to keep the heat on all the time in my apartment like I did the last few winters.....

    I have baseboard heating in a 750 sq. foot first floor apartment. I just turned the heat on for the first time since last winter.

    Does anybody have any tips on how to keep the heat in, and how to make the warmth last longer while keeping electric costs somewhat moderate?

    I'm not dirt-poor, I can have some heat, just not as much as I used to...... Heh.

  2. #2

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    Do you have to mainly protect yourself, or do you need to protect stuff from the cold?

  3. #3

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    It really doesn't get freezing cold in my apartment to the point where I have to worry about my electronics being damaged. I usually do like keeping my place around 60-65 degrees for the most part, though.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by KaworuVsDrWily View Post
    Seeing as I am now unemployed, and I can't afford to keep the heat on all the time in my apartment like I did the last few winters.....

    I have baseboard heating in a 750 sq. foot first floor apartment. I just turned the heat on for the first time since last winter.

    Does anybody have any tips on how to keep the heat in, and how to make the warmth last longer while keeping electric costs somewhat moderate?

    I'm not dirt-poor, I can have some heat, just not as much as I used to...... Heh.
    Plastic the windows, get spray-foam insulation and go to town on any gaps/voids/electrical outlet boxes ... let's see ... aha. Weatherstrip the doors and windows ... and make and drink lots of tea.

    As for me, I cannot afford to run the heat/AC in this place. I'm rolling the dice, in other words, that it does not get too cold and I end up freezing. Last year, in my house, it got down to 36F inside before I decided that I needed heat more than food. I was worried about the pipes freezing. : (

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by h3g3l View Post
    ... and make and drink lots of tea.
    Won't that just lead to needing more diapers? *giggle*

    I went as far as to put 1/2 inch white foam over the windows around my bed last winter and I can tell you it really helps. I also have a flexable plastic tube which takes the warm exaust air from my desktop power supply and channels it to my feet when I am at the computer ^_^ I also use a sleeping bag as a comforter, with it all unzipped on the coldest nights. They are super toasty if you have one.

    Normally my advice in general would be, "let your first floor neighbor worry about heating your apt." lol. I guess that won't work here.

  6. #6

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    H3g3l pretty much said it--it's all about insulation. Plastic on the windows or even some sort of thick drape or blanket to keep the heat in is important. It's shocking how much heat is lost through windows. Can you possibly move to an upper floor or get a unit that has as many adjoining walls (with other heated apartments) as possible? I'm on the second floor in my building, and I don't have the heat on. It's getting down to 30 degrees at night, and my apartment is usually around 68 degrees by morning. It heats up to the low 70's during the day (outside temps ranging from 40-50 degrees). There's no reason why my apartment should be so warm, if it wasn't receiving a lot of heat transferred from my downstairs neighbors...

    I would also recommend a heating pad; they take some electricity, but probably less than what it takes to heat the whole apartment. And don't forget footed PJ's!

  7. #7

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    Definitely go with h3g3l's advice, and wear lots of sweaters. I live in Florida, and it rarely gets gets below 40F here, so I can't really give you much more advice than that. (But I'm definitely taking suggestions from this thread. I'm moving up to Connecticut one day and I'm a betta dork who doesn't exactly enjoy spending money on utilities. But, thanks to Defect, I'm definitely going to try to get a 2nd floor apt.)

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shukkume View Post
    But, thanks to Defect, I'm definitely going to try to get a 2nd floor apt.)
    It really does help. I lived in the same apartment for about 5 years and I chose it because it was the 2nd floor of a 3 floor apt building. And that ment I had potential head comming from every side of me I only turned on the heat a handfull of times when it was over 10 below freezing. (northern, pacific northwest).

  9. #9

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    I live in the 3rd floor of a 3-story condo, and it stays toasty up here year-round, since heat rises. Great in the winter, terrible in the summer.

  10. #10

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    Yes, we were on the 7th floor of our building in Norway. As cold as it was last winter, the only heat we had on for the 1300 square foot apartment was the floor heat in the bathroom, and it was only on a very low setting. We would occasionally turn on a fireplace for about 15 minutes if a room had a bit of a chill in it. I actually had to open the windows on occasion because the heat rising into our apartment was so warm. It probably also helped that we had 27 windows, which caught what little sun there was and warmed us up.

    Wear sweaters, pj's, use blankets. Try towels along the base of the door. If you are only in one room mainly, close that room off and only run the heat in it.

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