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Thread: A collection of information concerning incontinence.

  1. #1

    Default A collection of information concerning incontinence.

    I have looked around the internet in hopes of piecing together some information about incontinence, in all its forms. The purpose of this thread is to educate those concerned about whether they have incontinence, I've seen a lot of threads asking if X condition is a form of incontinence. (I myself have been guilty of this in the past.)

    If you have any suggestions on things to add, please post.

    Stress Incontinence

    Stress incontinence refers to the leakage of urine due to increased abdominal pressure, which can include sneezing, coughing, laughing, heavy lifting, or increased body strain. (Women suffer from this on a much larger scale than men.) Stress incontinence may occur as a result of weakened pelvic muscles that support the bladder and urethra or because of a malfunction of the urethral sphincter. Kegel exercises can be employed to help protect against this.

    Urge Incontinence

    Urge incontinence, also known as overactive bladder, is the term for the condition in which the sufferer is unable to realize his/her need to urinate until the urge is very strong, and they may be unable to make it to the toilet in time. (This is also more common in women than men.) This is caused by bladder muscles that contract inappropriately. Often these contractions occur regardless of the amount of urine that is in the bladder. Urge incontinence may result from neurological injuries (such as spinal cord injury or stroke), neurological diseases (such as multiple sclerosis), infection, bladder cancer, bladder stones, bladder inflammation, or bladder outlet obstruction.

    In some cases, people may experience a combination of the above two forms of urinary incontinence. This is simply referred to as mixed urinary incontinence.

    Overflow Incontinence

    Overflow incontinence is caused by the bladder's inability to empty properly, which results in frequent urination and urine spilling over after it thinks it is "done". (This is more common in men than women.) This is an inability to empty your bladder, leading to overflow. With overflow incontinence, sometimes you may feel as if you never completely empty your bladder. When you try to urinate, you may produce only a weak stream of urine. This type of incontinence is common in people with a damaged bladder or blocked urethra and in men with prostate gland problems. Nerve damage from diabetes also can lead to overflow incontinence. Some medications can cause or increase the risk of developing overflow incontinence.

    Functional Incontinence

    This refers to when there are no real problems in the individual's bladder, but there is an inability to reach a toilet in time. Things that may cause this include full body casts, dementia, and old age. This is most common in the elderly. (Thanks Jeremiah)

    Enuresis

    Commonly known as bedwetting, this may be caused by the liver not producing enough hormones during the night to alert the person that he/she needs to urinate. It may also be caused by an immature bladder, or in our case, extended periods of 24/7 wearing. (It happened to me, but I got over it.)
    Gross Total Incontinence

    This is an inability to empty your bladder, leading to overflow. With overflow incontinence, sometimes you may feel as if you never completely empty your bladder. When you try to urinate, you may produce only a weak stream of urine. This type of incontinence is common in people with a damaged bladder or blocked urethra and in men with prostate gland problems. Nerve damage from diabetes also can lead to overflow incontinence. Some medications can cause or increase the risk of developing overflow incontinence.

    I hope this guide proves to be helpful! Please comment.
    Last edited by Kovy; 18-Jun-2008 at 12:37.

  2. #2

    Default

    Functional incontinence is mentioned on some websites. This is usually mentioned by sites concerned with the elderly. This incontinence actually has nothing to do with bladder or bowel defects. This problem is cause by some other impairment that prevents an individual from getting to a toilet quick enough. Dementia or full body casts can cause this form of incontinence. In my experience, Wyoming interstates may also cause this (over 60 miles between towns).

  3. #3

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks guys!
    Information has been added.
    Last edited by Kovy; 31-May-2008 at 11:04.

  5. #5

  6. #6
    Darkfinn

    Default

    I just saw a report by the Navy Health Department indicating that recently developed bladder control drugs carry an increased risk of memory loss as a side effect. One doctor said that IC persons might want to reconsider diapers as a viable method of protection.

    If you take the drugs... your bladder might hold... but then you can't remember where the toilet is! LOL

  7. #7

    Default

    :O

    That's an interesting report, I had not heard it before. Thanks for posting, Darkfinn.

  8. #8

    Default

    Here is some information for treatment from WebMD:

    The following changes to diet and lifestyle may help reduce incontinence:

    • Reduce or eliminate caffeinated and carbonated drinks-such as coffee, tea, and soda pop-from your diet.
    • Do not drink more than one alcoholic drink per day.
    • Try to identify any foods that might irritate your bladder-including citrus fruits, chocolate, tomatoes, vinegars, spicy foods, dairy products, and aspartame-and eat less of those foods.
    • If you smoke, quit.
    • If constipation is a problem, increase the amount of fiber in your diet. You can do this easily by adding a small amount of wheat bran, even a spoonful, to dishes you normally eat.
    • If you are overweight, try to lose some weight. Remember that effective weight-loss programs depend on a combination of diet and exercise.
    • Try Pelvic Floor (Kegel) exercises to strengthen pelvic muscles.

    The following changes to urinary habits may help reduce incontinence:

    • Establish a schedule of urinating every 3 to 4 hours, regardless of whether you feel the need.
    • Practice "double voiding" by urinating as much as possible, relaxing for a few moments, and then urinating again.
    • If you have trouble reaching the bathroom before you urinate, consider making a clearer, quicker path to the bathroom and wearing clothes that are easily removed (such as those with elastic waistbands or Velcro closures), or keep a urinal close to your bed or chair.

    Talk with your health professional about all medicines you take, including nonprescription medicines, to see whether any of them may be making your incontinence worse. Some medications cause incontinence include certain antidepressants, sedatives, and even some allergy and cold medicines.


    In summary, due to the increase in caffeine use, more people will suffer some form of urinary incontinence. You may want to rethink that quad shot latte or huge fountain drink. Additionally, alcohol and nicotine will increase incontinence symptoms. You may want to reconsider your habits. As for me, diapers are the better solution.

  9. #9
    Darkfinn

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremiah View Post
    As for me, diapers are the better solution.
    Well said!

    Why spend your life tethered to the nearest toilet.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darkfinn View Post
    Well said!

    Why spend your life tethered to the nearest toilet.
    I second this observation!

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