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Thread: Freaking out...

  1. #1

    Default Freaking out...

    Well I started my first year of college last wednesday and I made a proclamation to myself. I promised myself that with this migration to a "new world", I would leave behind in the old world my depression, anxiety, past grudges, ect. Basically I will come to college with the books on my back and the knowledge in my head and start a new life, one which will enable me to make friends and have a happier, overall better life than I did in High School.

    With this promise I made, I wanted to not worry about money so much and not be obsessed with it. However, just going over my expenses and income I am freaking out, since I will be running at a loss every month. I already work 3 jobs and am considering getting a 4th to even out my balance sheet a bit. I go to school 4 days a week and work 3, every single minute not spent on school or studying is spent on working. I am doing everything I can t learn new skills to make more money.

    I wanted to join a club or two and find ways to make friends, since my therapist said I needed to not work all the time, which I would like to do(make more friends). You know...I want to have an enjoyable college experience. But every time I look at income and look at expenses I cut as my as i can and still come up a bit short and to be honest it terrifys me to death to think of being financially crippled coming out of college.

    Should I just say "fuck it" to the finances and figure out what to do when the time comes to figure that out? Should I keep running at a loss? Should I try to have a good time in college? Or should I keep working my 72 hour weeks, or should I step this up to putting in 100 + weeks?

    *with the way my schedule is right now, I don't have time to see my psych.

    I just need some advice. (I'm also a commuter student)

  2. #2

    Default

    I personaly think you should just do what you can. Once you finish college you will be able to get better jobs. And with better jobs, comes more money. But this isn't something I have actualy acomplished myself so feel free to ignore me. But as far as I do know, school should be your main concern. If you don't do well in school and fail, you wasted all the money you put into it wether it be scholarship money or money you have to pay later, you will feel pretty dumb if you don't do well in the class.

  3. #3

    Default

    To be blunt, you don't have time to add another job. Burnout is a serious concern with your current schedule. As it is, you don't have much margin for large homework assignments and studying for exams.

    I think it's time to have a chat with financial aid, figure out how much student debt someone entering into your field can comfortably carry, and likely drop a job or two. You need time to make friends, you need time to see your psych, you need free time period. If you're doing all this and it's not enough, you've got to put your foot down somewhere. You certainly wouldn't be the first student to graduate carrying debt.

  4. #4

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by cornkid View Post
    I personaly think you should just do what you can. Once you finish college you will be able to get better jobs. And with better jobs, comes more money. But this isn't something I have actualy acomplished myself so feel free to ignore me. But as far as I do know, school should be your main concern. If you don't do well in school and fail, you wasted all the money you put into it wether it be scholarship money or money you have to pay later, you will feel pretty dumb if you don't do well in the class.
    Well ya, doing well in school and doing the best that i can do is a given, but there are other things I want to get from school, mainly the social interaction.

  5. #5

    Default

    University or College shouldn't be about social interaction if what you want is to reap a high paying and interesting job from it. I know that for a lot of people uni is about the 'experience' well yeah maybe but those people usually end up failing or getting some useless arts degree. This is especially true if your finances are tight and money is an issue. Echoing the opinions of those before me, I would recommend you quit 2 of your jobs, take on some debt, buckle down and get good grades and relax a little. Yeah social interaction is nice and all but in reality most human beings only really ever have a few close friends and if you don't have a close friend(s) already I'm sure you will find some. I mean aren't you interacting with others when you are in class?

    Hey well this is only my opinion and I'm not asking you to follow it, but just to consider it....

  6. #6

    Default

    It's not uncommon for a person to come out of college with a lot of debt; think student loans. My fear would be working the hours you are right now and going to school full time; you're going to burn out. I'm surprised you have time for anything, let alone school. I would suggest cutting back on your work hours or your school hours.

  7. #7

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by diaperedteenager View Post
    Well I started my first year of college last wednesday and I made a proclamation to myself. I promised myself that with this migration to a "new world", I would leave behind in the old world my depression, anxiety, past grudges, ect. Basically I will come to college with the books on my back and the knowledge in my head and start a new life, one which will enable me to make friends and have a happier, overall better life than I did in High School.

    With this promise I made, I wanted to not worry about money so much and not be obsessed with it. However, just going over my expenses and income I am freaking out, since I will be running at a loss every month. I already work 3 jobs and am considering getting a 4th to even out my balance sheet a bit. I go to school 4 days a week and work 3, every single minute not spent on school or studying is spent on working. I am doing everything I can t learn new skills to make more money.

    I wanted to join a club or two and find ways to make friends, since my therapist said I needed to not work all the time, which I would like to do(make more friends). You know...I want to have an enjoyable college experience. But every time I look at income and look at expenses I cut as my as i can and still come up a bit short and to be honest it terrifys me to death to think of being financially crippled coming out of college.

    Should I just say "fuck it" to the finances and figure out what to do when the time comes to figure that out? Should I keep running at a loss? Should I try to have a good time in college? Or should I keep working my 72 hour weeks, or should I step this up to putting in 100 + weeks?

    *with the way my schedule is right now, I don't have time to see my psych.

    I just need some advice. (I'm also a commuter student)
    You're stressing out over your "proclamation" to not stress out.

    There is something very wrong--and very cynically funny--with this picture. As before, your focus is all wrong. This may take you some time to figure out, but when you get your focus figured out, things will go better for you.

    As it stands now, though, you're doomed to repeat your spirals of anxiety, rage, self-loathing, and so forth.



    Quote Originally Posted by Tuples View Post
    University or College shouldn't be about social interaction if what you want is to reap a high paying and interesting job from it.
    You miss the entire point of university and its benefit. I don't begrudge you this, or misunderstand and say that you should know better, but it is a horribly sad thing to see.

  8. #8
    Peachy

    Default

    Education is an investment: You pay first and reap the rewards later. So don't try desparately to come out with a clean bill, because then you'll have missed half of the education due to being too tired, gone for work, or not having the social network supporting you in your studies.
    You can pay back your loans later in life if you do succeed in your education.

    Peachy

  9. #9

    Default

    I'm going to second the warning about burnout, I've been there myself and it's not something you'd want to go though.

    Burnout doesn't just mean you get tired, it gives you a kind of tunnel vision too - you end up being fixated on just keeping going as you are, which just makes it worse.

    Depending on what you want to do after school, perhaps there's another option. Is it possible for you to get an apprenticeship perhaps?
    This is the way I went after high school, specifically because I couldn't afford higher education. It gave me a job 3.5-4 days a week, and a day to a day and a half in college, and I got paid for it all. Also, because apprentices are counted as full time employees, I got all the standard employee benefits like holiday time (I know that's a bit different in the US, but I'm guessing they still give people some time off!).
    The wages aren't fantastic, but they can be reasonable and you don't have to work stupid hours to get them!

    There's some words of advice I was given years ago about debt that might help as well. Debt itself is not a problem, so long as you can service it comfortably. That's to say don't be afraid of taking on a little debt, so long as the repayments don't leave you struggling.

    To give you an example from my past again, when I was an apprentice I needed a car and driving license to progress professionally. So I took out a loan to pay for these that actually was almost as much as my annual salary but to be repaid over a over a long period so I could manage the repayments. The car helped me get a better job, which bought with it a better salary, which meant I paid the loan off 2 years early!

    I found the trick is to use financial tools, such as loans, as a means to progress professionally. Use them only to help you get one-off things, like a basic car or some training, that will help you earn more money. All the people I know who've had problems with debt had so because they only used it to pay for so called "lifestyle" items, like clothes, house extensions, fancy cars, holidays etc. They used loans and credit cards as if they were actual money, not as a means of investing in themselves, and that landed them in trouble!

    I hope this helps, and good luck
    Last edited by Chrisb; 05-Sep-2010 at 10:58.

  10. #10

    Default

    Get a loan and enjoy yourself. Education pays way better than a house, even when the debt is mortgage sized... Just as long as you take something that pays, like engineering.

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