Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Are people too quick to phase out technology these days?

  1. #1

    Default Are people too quick to phase out technology these days?

    So, I was complaining on Twitter about the fact that iOS 4.0 is horribly unstable on my iPod Touch 2G the other day. It's slow, I knew that. It's neutered features wise, I knew that. Given that I've accepted that, you can at least guarantee it works, right? So that it doesn't crash every other hour of use.

    Ok, I know your business model is about selling me that shiny new one you just released today, along with everything you see fit to prefix with the letter i, but you know, these things cost money.

    The main defence people seem to give to this is that "You can hardly expect Apple to support devices forever". No, no I can't. I can however to expect them to support them for longer than 2 years. Or for some people, longer than 1 year. Following Apple's usual pattern, support for the iPod Touch 2G will be discontinued with iOS 5 next June.

    They're still selling these things as new with the 8GB model, and will do until stores deplete their stocks.

    Now, before you think this is a rant directed at Apple, I'll point out that other companies do this too. On Google's Android platform, developers are constantly complaining about fragmentation of the platform with different OS versions. Welcome to the real world, people. Yes, most developers rush out to buy the newest versions as soon as possible. No one else does.

    Actually, the Android people are even worse than Apple here. Their target of hate (software this time) is Android 1.6, released 1 year ago. That's 36% of your user base, folks. Oh, I'm sorry, your flashy new scrolling feature is harder to write. Never heard of graceful degradation? As a web developer who has to deal with the decade old IE6, I have no sympathy for people wanting to kill support for something that's merely from last year.

    Oh, well maybe no one does support their old stuff. You can hardly expect anyone to do it if no one does. Well, actually...

    Software example (Win2k)


    For ten years after its release, it continued to receive patches for security vulnerabilities nearly every month until reaching the end of its lifecycle on 13 July 2010.
    Many third party programs still support Win2k, so it's not just Microsoft. And their 9 year old operating system, Windows XP, is still universally supported. If Microsoft announced they were ending support for it tomorrow, I'm sure there would be uproar.

    Hardware example (Ubuntu support for old processors)


    Processor (x86) 300 MHz 1 GHz
    Memory 128 MB 512 MB
    Hard Drive (free space) 1 GB 5 GB
    Monitor Resolution 640480 1024768
    For some persective, that's a Pentium 3 for a desktop, and a Pentium 2 for a server. 7 and 11 year old hardware. And Ubuntu is relatively heavy for most Linux distributions. Plus in both cases, as desktop operating systems, they're exposed to a much greater degree of hardware variation than smartphones.

    And the fact that I can install a modern Linux distribution on a computer that isn't just "last year's thing", but effectively an antique says miles for Apple's "We can't support that! It's a year old!" stance.

    So why do Apple and Google get a free ticket to quickly drop support for old hardware and software?

  2. #2

    Default

    There is one area where Microsoft does a rather decent job, and its supporting there old software. From an end user perspective (especially in a business setting) its a godsend, and frankly an area where Apple has much to learn (although I fear cutting support to there old hardware might be part of there business strategy).
    To Apple's and Google's defend, tough, people do tend to change cellphone much more often that they change computer. Frankly, I'll be changing cellphone within days of my contract expiring, and that's what most people I know do. The exception when it comes to long(er) term support seems to be RIM but, hey, Blackberies are a convoluted mess to use in part due to the wide range of devices the OS must be used on.

    Anyway, I personally find in alarming that my one year old iPhone 3Gs already feels ancient compared to an iPhone 4...

  3. #3

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Hex View Post
    So why do Apple and Google get a free ticket to quickly drop support for old hardware and software?
    They aren't primary players in the phone market and phone hardware is changed out more rapidly.

    I have a nearly 4 year old RAZR, works as a phone, browser wise it's a joke. It's been discontinued for ages, Sprint and Moto have no upgrade path AT ALL for the software. What I have is what I've got as of about 24 months ago.

    It wasn't that long ago that you didn't update the software on your phone. What it had when you bought it, was what you had for the life of the device.

    Now that phones are more sophisticated people now complain that builders only support phones of a certain age or model. Frankly, you should be happy they are updatable at all for heavens sake My old 6100 series Nokia had a software glitch that scrambled the display it's whole life, no update ever came for it.

    My DVD player, Plasma TV, Microwave, Refrigerator and a host of other devices can't have their software updated in any meaningful way, oddly enough people don't seem to grouse about these. The builder of my TV for instance wouldn't even consider me running newer software. Yet we get on phone and computer makers about them updating our machines.

  4. #4

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Near View Post
    There is one area where Microsoft does a rather decent job, and its supporting there old software....
    Except for the part where old software does not pile up in the junkyard. People buy new pcs every 2 damn years. Oh no Ive got a virus! Time to through out my computer! Why people cannot seem to figure out how to reinstall windows on a prefectly good computer is beyond me. I am surfing this site using Mac OS 10.5 on a nine year old Powermac. I have my old Tangerine Imac from 1999 set up with a 40 GB Jukebox.

  5. #5

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by ForeverSmall View Post
    Except for the part where old software does not pile up in the junkyard. People buy new pcs every 2 damn years. Oh no Ive got a virus! Time to through out my computer! Why people cannot seem to figure out how to reinstall windows on a prefectly good computer is beyond me. I am surfing this site using Mac OS 10.5 on a nine year old Powermac. I have my old Tangerine Imac from 1999 set up with a 40 GB Jukebox.
    You've never worked as an IT tech for a business, right? Believe me, old stuff DOES pileup there, and "legacy" is a huge concern every time you want to upgrade virtually anything.

    And I agree, with a bit of tweaking an old box can do most things "normal" end users want (you don't need a quad core and 4 gig of ram to surf the net and listen to music). You just need to get rid of all the crapware that has a way of finding its way to most people's computers.

  6. #6
    angelabauer

    Default

    Hex, what exactly do you want?

    Are you begging for free and never-ending free tech support for all the hardware and software you own?

    Do you expect every computer to support every software ever written?

    As others have stated, in the real world of business use of computers, there are valid reasons for mandating uniform standards where the employer is paying for the software, hardware and support. This might involve using the newest OS, or it might involve a wait-and-see approach.

    When a computer becomes infected, a cost/value analysis needs to be made by IT professionals. Sometimes removing the malware is not difficult. Sometimes even if the malware is removed nobody can be sure that computer can safely be connected to an internal network. Often the lest expensive and safest solution is to replace the computer and re-install only the minimum necessary software. Of course the files were backed-up.

  7. #7

    Default

    Its all about the revenue stream. Is there anything in Vista, Windows 7, or the last 3 versions of Office that any of us really need for everyday tasks? Microsoft, Apple, Intel, Mot, etc., etc. are 1/10 their current size if people bought what they needed instead of being seduced by the next big thing.

    Is there any legitimate reason you have to have a phone with a browser in your car? I'd rather you didn't. I'd be a lot safer and my insurance would cost less.

    I finally had to bail on my Windows 98 machine when I couldn't get anti-virus updates for it. It still works fine. All the productivity software on it is still more than sufficient for normal day-to-day needs.

  8. #8

    Default

    Can't resist, I have to add my two cents:

    Concerning high-tech stuff, like computers, video games, etc. I think it's a good thing, I would never come back to a Windows 3.11. On that domain I only keep old stuff for nostalgia, I'm still looking for a Windows 3.11.

    However some technologies are phased out only for economical purposes. The best example is those compact fluorescents. Here in Quebec we have hydroelectricity, so what is the point of saving energy if that energy does little or no harm to the environment? The real reason (I think) is to make people replace everything, which is very lucrative!

    Other good examples, TVs. There's still a bunch of CRT TVs around, but the trend is now those LCD, plasma or OLED TVs. I've gotta admit that LCD monitors are AWESOME! I can't stand old CRT monitors, unlike TVs they don't have interlacing, and it hurts eyes after a while... But old CRT TVs last forever! At the local recycle centre I don't count all those projection and plasma TVs that failed for various reasons.

    Back to lighting stuff. Now fluorescent lights have those electronic ballasts. Some are OK, but many are crappy, especially those OEM or unbranded ballasts with low-end chinese components. Before failing the older magnetic ballasts can last 20, 30, 40, even more than 50 years! I even saw old ones from late 30s still working!!

    Oh and about changing PCs, I still run my HP Pavilion a1340n PC from 2005, will soon need a couple of upgrades (RAM, GPU, maybe an extra HDD), but it still works like a charm! And it still fulfils my needs, I don't feel the necessity to change it.

    The hard drive never failed. Why it still works after 5 years of > 12 hrs./day service is because it's a Western Digital. ^__^

  9. #9

    Default

    it's all about money, isn't it? and i'm not meaning just the companies concerned, i mean a whole big chunk of the global economy revolves around technogical development and it's financing and this has had a cultural knock-on effect in loads of other areas of life.
    to my mind, for a long time Apple was a victim of the global/asian economy as it was continually spied upon and had it's developments and ideas pinched/copied which where then thrown into production asap by asian companies before Apple even knew what was going on. all that, at that speed, takes financial backing and everybody involved in that backing will be financially looking for a way out of the deal, or a financial cushion, in case it all goes wrong.
    i know there's been a marked change in the attitude at Apple and they now seem to be as bad, if not worse, than those who had preyed upon them. the run-up to last xmas is a good example of this as all the available home music equipment were suddenly i-pod compatible, at the expense of mp3 players/flash usb which were, and probably still are, the dominant format for portable music. obviously, Apple had taken out some loan (borrowed money somehow) to buy the favour of the major manufacturers (to get the i-pod/i-phone in every xmas stocking). this pissed me off cos i was looking for a new stereo at that time, with mp3 and usb compatability. couldn't get one, so i bought an ex-display Sony model (with i-pod dock) for 60 from Asda. that was a bit of a surreal bargain as the model is still being retailed for up to 160 at Asda (they still need display models afterall). SONY MHC-EC79i Mini Hi-Fi System buy online | Currys
    asda change their prices like the wind changes, as part of their cost-confusion policy.

    i only know two people with Apple products, btw; they're too overpriced for normal people. so, i'll be the old fuddy-duddy and say, "how the hell does Apple stay in business?", as was once often said.
    loans? 'house of cards' and 'gust of wind' spring to mind.

  10. #10

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by angelabauer View Post
    Hex, what exactly do you want?

    Are you begging for free and never-ending free tech support for all the hardware and software you own?
    Never ending support? No. Support within a timeframe that they are still selling the good to some people, and that's well within the warranty for others? Yes.




    Quote Originally Posted by ade View Post
    i only know two people with Apple products, btw; they're too overpriced for normal people. so, i'll be the old fuddy-duddy and say, "how the hell does Apple stay in business?", as was once often said.
    loans? 'house of cards' and 'gust of wind' spring to mind.
    No, it's that overpricing that allows them to stay in business. When you're charging at least twice as much as your competitors, but still have raving fanboys who buy the newest version of every single good you make, you don't actually need to have as many customers as when you're making €10 on each €300 computer you sell.

Similar Threads

  1. Overcoming shyness and how to approach people/talk to people?
    By timmahtherebel in forum Mature Topics
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 30-May-2010, 05:53
  2. Revisiting Old Technology
    By Trevor in forum Off-topic
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 13-Jul-2009, 12:22
  3. Hello I'm PHASE II
    By phase II in forum Greetings / Introductions
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 10-Nov-2008, 13:09
  4. Sony OLED TV Technology
    By Grutzvalt in forum Off-topic
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 19-Aug-2008, 00:13

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
ADISC.org - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community.
ADISC.org is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.