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Thread: Essential Reading

  1. #1

    Default Essential Reading

    So, I realize that a significant number of of the membership is currently worrying about going back to school, and being forced tor read (gasp!) books. So for those of us that are a little bit older, and can appreciate reading for the pleasure of it, what do you consider essential reading for the well-rounded person?

    My (not anywhere in the neighborhood of complete) list:

    Ender's Game (despite the fact that I despise the author)
    Lies My Teacher Told Me (for Americans)
    The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit
    All Quiet on the Western Front
    Catch 22
    1984
    Animal Farm
    The Dark Tower Series
    Common Sense (again, primarily for Americans)

  2. #2

    Default

    Lord of the Flies is one book that people have told me everyone should read, though I wasn't all too impressed with it when I read it in 9th grade. A book that I do actually love is Treasure Island. It doesn't have any deeply profound stuff, but it's an awesome read.

  3. #3

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Maytricks View Post
    Lord of the Flies is one book that people have told me everyone should read, though I wasn't all too impressed with it when I read it in 9th grade. A book that I do actually love is Treasure Island. It doesn't have any deeply profound stuff, but it's an awesome read.
    I felt the same way about Catcher In the Rye. Stupid book, crap story, idiotic characters, and the damn thing just ended abruptly.

  4. #4

    Default

    Brideshead Revisted - Evelyn Waugh
    The curious case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde - R.L.S. (Incidentally, Charlie and I live very close to the dwelling of Deacon Brodie who was Roberts inspiration for this book!)
    Kidnapped - R.L.S.

  5. #5

    Default

    Wilbur Smith is an exceptionally good author that is not terribly well known, I'de say he's probably my favorite author of all time. I am not the type of person that can typically read the same book more then once, but I've read "Birds of Prey" and it's sequels (Monsoon, and Blue Horizon) twice now. Both times I couldn't put them down until I was finished, and was sad when it ended.

    I recommend it to anyone, it's a fantastically epic story. Wilbur Smith has some other really good ones too like River God and Warlock.

    To be honset I think "Required reading" varies on the individual. For example. I would consider the original "Dune" to be required reading for anyone who loves sci-fi and a great story, and I am always surprised how few people have read it.

  6. #6

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    Catch22 was weird....it took me about a month to finish. Good, but weird. It was funny, I was listening to background music by the band Catch22 while reading the book

  7. #7
    Lilprincessai

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    Step on a crack-James Patterson nice thriller
    Spy-Ted Bell loved it from cover to cover

  8. #8
    ironfox

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    Well, I have a personal reading list i'm currently involved in right now

    The Prince
    Snowcrash
    2001: a space Odyssey
    neuromancer
    The art of deception and some other books which I wont mention

  9. #9

    Default

    I would second 1984, Catch-22, The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit, and Animal Farm. For people who liked 1984, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is another excellent take on the idea of a dystopia.

    I don't really read children's books anymore, but I feel inspired to recommend Harriet the Spy (Louise Fitzhugh), A Cricket in Times Square (George Selden), and anything by Andrew Clements.

    Some other books I would recommend are The Old Man and the Sea (Ernest Hemingway), East of Eden ( John Steinbeck), and either House of Leaves (Mark Z. Danielewski) or Infinite Jest (David Foster Wallace). The last two I would recommend because they're very different narrative-wise than the normal novel.

    I also enjoy Stephen King, but I'm not sure I'd call his word "essential." If you like horror, he's essential, but otherwise not. While I'm on the topic of horror, H.P Lovecraft is also excellent.

    I'm sure if I come back in a few days I'll have a new list of works to recommend that I've forgotten now.

  10. #10

    Default

    For a really serious political recommendation I'd say 'Rise of the Meritocracy' by Michael Young - look out for it, it's hard to get, but it has important stuff to say even though it's 50 years old.
    Completely different and on a very personal level, Stephen Fry's autobiography 'Moab is my wash-pot' which I first read when I was 12, and I've re-read just about every year since. iIt's not a book to make you a 'rounded person' so much as a good book for the sort of slightly jagged people I think most ABDL's would tend to be.

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