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Thread: Moral redemption

  1. #1

    Default Moral redemption

    I was wondering how others here felt about the topic of moral redemption.

    Do you believe it is obtainable for those who are willing to put in the effort, or do you believe is it merely a myth created by the weak to make them feel better about themselves? Or are your opinions completely different from those two sides of the coin?

    I have my opinions - I want to hear the ones you have.

  2. #2

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    This leads me to believe something has happened to you or someone else and you wish to know if through 'moral redemption' what was reaped will be sowed? and/or your just wondering.

    Well going off those assumptions (correct me if I'm wrong) I don't prescribe to the mystic version of moral redemption. When an individual has a negative character trait each one have their own actions and reactions possible from each individual they meet. A cheating boyfriend will potential do so unless the consequences are beyond their tolerance. I know that a socially unaccepted behavior will eventually depending on it's degree of severity attract negative consequences by merits of it's actions not because of some cosmic force.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zoey View Post
    This leads me to believe something has happened to you or someone else and you wish to know if through 'moral redemption' what was reaped will be sowed? and/or your just wondering.
    Actually, I believe I am on the road to my own moral redemption from living my past with an insanely selfish and destructive lifestyle, through diving headfirst into the AA program. I believe my moral redemption will be found in service towards those I have hurt and service towards others in need with problems similar to my own.

    But I have not started this thread to start arguments with people who disagree with that. I am interested in seeing what other people think about the topic of moral redemption - I am interested in knowing the different views that are out there.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by RebornKaworu View Post
    Actually, I believe I am on the road to my own moral redemption from living my past with an insanely selfish and destructive lifestyle, through diving headfirst into the AA program. I believe my moral redemption will be found in service towards those I have hurt and service towards others in need with problems similar to my own.

    But I have not started this thread to start arguments with people who disagree with that. I am interested in seeing what other people think about the topic of moral redemption - I am interested in knowing the different views that are out there.
    That was my intent, I apologies if it was taken otherwise. I'm glad you've taken another direction in your life, I've seen how hard it can be depending on the vice.

  5. #5
    Mako

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    Like zoey I don't believe in any cosmic redemption. Such would suggest there was an absolute morality or an ideal order of righteousness in the universe, which simply isn't the case. Morality is a construct created by the individual drawn from cultural influences and personal experiences. Something morally reprehensible in one culture is required and championed in another. The Etero people of Paupua New Guinea have young boys and adolescents drink the semen of their elders in order to pass on their strength and wisdom. In western cultures this practice would be shocking and illegal.

    But more specific to your situation, can you atone for things you feel personally you've done wrong? Well, in parts. You can always put the effort forth to make amends for wrong doings you have done, sometimes forgiveness will be given, sometimes not. But honesty and integrity shown by the act is commendable even if the original action is regrettable. I believe standing up for yourself to try and amend the things you've done wrong is noble, not weak.

  6. #6
    LilLillyKitten

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    Depends on who you believe is holding you accountable on a moral level...

    In my experience, undoing all of the lies and damage, or at least attempting to, is the best way to be able to forgive yourself. But, at the same time... it can sometimes be better to not undo certain aspects. It's rather tricky.

  7. #7

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    To me, moral redemption is a classic scam. Convince people they have a need that you - and only you - can fulfill, for a price. It works because we all feel guilty sometimes, and nobody likes that feeling. But there's good news! For an easy weekly payment of 10% of your earnings, you too can have moral absolution! (Those seeking moral absolution should consult their clergyman before tithing. Tithing success rates dramatically increase with regular diet, exercise and obedience to a religious organization. Side effects may include lowered standard of living, abandonment of family and friends, never getting to sleep in on a Sunday, feelings of guilt in previously enjoyed activities, drymouth and erectile dysfunction. Tithing should not be undertaken with alcohol.)

    Basically, if you're feeling guilty about something, then do your best to make it right. It isn't easy, it isn't cheap, it isn't fast, but it works a lot better than pretty much anything else.

  8. #8

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    bgi, what you mention is a scam. Throwing money towards the church does not redeem anything. I will agree with you on that much.

    I believe true moral redemption comes in admitting wrongs, doing what can be done to repair them, and then helping others get out of the similar guilt and shame they are experiencing once the time is right. (Yeah, I guess you can tell the message of AA really spoke to me directly.)

  9. #9
    Butterfly Mage

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    I follow the Wiccan Rede. We don't actually believe in sin, but we do believe in not harming others. Moral redemption under the Rede involves making amends threefold in comparison to the harm inflicted. (Likewise, we believe that acts that affirm life and peace gain a threefold karmic return).

  10. #10

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    I think I would rather see it in much simpler terms. As teenagers, our frontal lobes haven't fully developed, and so we are immature and do stupid, sometimes regrettable things. As we physically mature, we hopefully grow up, and see the world differently. If things work as they should, we begin to make better life decisions. For me, I moved, married, started my family, developed my career, stopped doing drugs and drank less alcohol. I'm sure I was a dick to a number of people while on this journey, but others treated me much the same. In the end, it equals out.

    The other side is my brother in law. He chose to drink and use illegal drugs, which eventually destroyed his health. He never worked a legitimate job, and so now he can't qualify for social security. I don't know how he will be able to retire. Morale Redemption may be a quirky area, because it demands judgments based on a moral balance scale, in my opinion. But you don't need morality to understand what works and what doesn't; what harms us, and what makes us happy.

    I want to congratulate you RebornKaworu because you are doing what my brother in law, and millions like him, have been unable to do. Don't worry about the past, that harm that you have caused yourself or others. That's water over the dam. What is important is the new you, and the better person you are becoming. How awesome!

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