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Thread: The Louisiana Oil Disaster

  1. #1

    Default The Louisiana Oil Disaster

    I live in South Central Louisiana. The markets for us are going down for us like a bottomless pit. Louisiana's culture is seafood. We have tons of water systems that meet with the gulf, and when even a tropical storm or hurricane hits, its gonna be devastating. The oil will travel upstream (Coastal Louisiana is under sea level 40 miles from the coast.) I myself have been on these vessels in the Gulf of Mexico that drill for oil and what not. Most of them are in poor condition, oil companies never take regard to anything but their own profit. This could even been done to raise prices on fuel. You can never tell. The Jack-up rigs in the gulf are hardly in good shape.

    There's always a risk of staff infection because of poor maintenance. Then those people that are in charge of the so called "mud" are usually the ones sitting in the TV lounge of the rig. The oil companies are already in great debt to Louisiana, because of this incident. People are losing fishery jobs, Seafood markets are laying off, and others related to this field that depend on this agriculture. Louisiana is screwed if a hurricane washes that oil into Louisiana streams. The government is doing just about a good job as Hurricane Katrina in this matter. They aren't doing shit about it. But when a third world country is going through a disaster they are gonna be there immediately. The news doesn't even show a percentage of what's going on. They are talking to the wrong people for information.

    That or the oil companies are paying them to limit what the public sees. Louisiana is home to several endangered species, inhabitants of these marshlands. This stuff is impossible to clean, once its done, The land is contaminated and our beaches and marshlands are a big Louisiana attraction besides the food and culture, I live near a lake where photographers flock to every year to take photos of endangered wildlife. If you don't care about these animals.... all the seafood you eat will be gone.

    Everyone needs to sue the oil companies that live along the gulf coast. Cause they can't just get a slap on the wrist over and over. They need to be taught a lesson. All they had to do was upkeep their equipment and keep testing, and perform tasks as told to and this wouldn't of happened. Hurricane Katrina is nothing compared to this.

    Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, and Texas are all in immediate danger, then when that oil hits that current it will bring that oil to the Florida Keys, up into the east coast and beyond.

    BP is sitting on there hands with this disaster, doing nothing at all to slow it. They used cheap ideas to try and slow it to no avail. They need to do whatever they can to stop this with the trillions of profits they have anything is possible to do to try and stop it.

  2. #2

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    There's already a thread on this

    Oh, and what exactly could the feds be doing that they aren't already? I now know two people who have been lured away from their regular (and quite well-paying) jobs to work on this. One is a petrochemical engineer, the other is an oceanographer. The feds have offered them HUGE money to work on this problem. By huge, I mean one of them is thinking he's gonna be able to retire after this. Dude's not even 35 yet. Of course, since BP is footing the bill, the taxpayers don't have to fork out a dime for this. But basically, I know with certainty that the feds are getting some of the best minds on the planet to work on this issue. You're right - Katrina was almost nothing compared to how bad this is gonna end up being. That's partly because it's WAY more complicated than anything other disaster of the kind ever faced.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by MeTaLMaNN1983 View Post
    1. Everyone needs to sue the oil companies that live along the gulf coast. Cause they can't just get a slap on the wrist over and over. They need to be taught a lesson. All they had to do was upkeep their equipment and keep testing, and perform tasks as told to and this wouldn't of happened. Hurricane Katrina is nothing compared to this.


    2. BP is sitting on there hands with this disaster, doing nothing at all to slow it. hey used cheap ideas to try and slow it to no avail. They need to do whatever they can to stop this with the trillions of profits they have anything is possible to do to try and stop it.
    1. While you do this, you should also do it to the politicians who are also to blame in this case. The MMS has shown time and time again that it makes policy that reflects what the oil companies want and institutes ridiculous guidelines for them to follow. Telling companies that the engineering drawings do not have to match installed equipment or have engineering stamps is a foolish policy and provides zero control. Any company that is in business to turn a profit will most likely use these kind of rules to their advantage to turn a higher profit. Suing companies that are not involved in this is not the answer, neither is trying to force companies into bankruptcy. Clean-up alone will top several billions of dollars and then legitimate claims for post clean-up damage will be the same.

    2. This is simply wrong and has zero basis in any fact. First off, BP does not have "trillions" in profits and never will, their 2009 profit was around $14 billion and will be lower because of the spill and the impact of the market on operations. They are doing everything they can to stop the spill, the fact of the matter is they are operating in frigid waters that are 5,000 feet deep and using technology that is designed for shallower depth and on land. There has been no real opportunity to test them at that depth either. The first attempt to stem the flow failed due to the build up of gas hydrates in the containment dome, a smaller dome was deployed but the pressures from the riser were too great for it. Relief wells were started immediately to reduce the pressure but those take time to drill. The top-kill that is underway right now has never been used at the depths they are operating and might not have worked depending on the pressure at the riser head. So far it looks very promising though, they are pumping 50 barrels of heavy mud per minute into the BOP, this should increase the hydrostatic pressure so that the well can be sealed forever.

    What methods would you have used to stop this within days?

    To say that they have been sitting on their hands is a far cry from what is happening. The government wanted to examine all plans for containment, it takes time to ship 70,000 barrels of drilling mud out to sea. Before people say that this kind of thing should be kept near or on site, it is simply not viable from a logistical or an economic standpoint, nor is it required by federal regulators. There are currently over 22,000 personnel deployed to deal with the spill; 1,100 vessels; close to 250,000 barrels of oil/water mix recovered and the have paid out 9,000/23,000 claims filed. They have most likely also exceeded their legal obligations in regards to non-cleanup liability, which is $75 million; which is needed so long as the claims are legitimate, which many will be.

    For my qualifications, I am required to know the ins and outs of the legalities of these kind of operations. This involves examining existing contracts, leases and laws as well as drafting new documents that will follow established regulations. We have to show regulatory bodies on a continuing basis the status of wells, rigs, pipelines and storage facilities to show continued compliance. The fines that can be levied are astronomical (if we go 1' into a level of strata we are not licensed to, the fines start at $50k and suspension of operation, reworking contracts to allow added royalty payments etc..) and the cost for one day of suspended operations can reach into the millions of dollars.

    EDIT: I can understand the reaction people are giving this. As someone who actually researches and reads about these every day it can get frustrating sometimes the "take no prisoners" approach without all the facts. If I come off as aggressive, I really do apologize, being able to dismantle arguments and rebut people trying to squeeze out a document that goes in their favor is an asset, the toneless nature of an internet post also doesn't help.
    Last edited by RetrieverPup; 27-May-2010 at 05:54.

  4. #4
    Butterfly Mage

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    I like the "take no prisoners" approach to Big Oil. What BP has inflicted on the ecology will take centuries for nature to undo.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly Mage View Post
    I like the "take no prisoners" approach to Big Oil. What BP has inflicted on the ecology will take centuries for nature to undo.
    down, girl... not that i blame you though.

    that said, my fisheries professor ( he PRIMARILY deals with management of fisheries aspects, from net and rawl methods, to breeding and spawning sites etc) said 'this means alot of my american collegues now get alot of work'

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Butterfly Mage View Post
    I like the "take no prisoners" approach to Big Oil. What BP has inflicted on the ecology will take centuries for nature to undo.
    Out of curiosity, from where are you deriving that centuries estimate? I will concede the estimates for discharge are high, but the ability of nature to remediate hydrocarbons isn't precisely nil, either.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Traemo View Post
    Out of curiosity, from where are you deriving that centuries estimate? I will concede the estimates for discharge are high, but the ability of nature to remediate hydrocarbons isn't precisely nil, either.
    It's more like decades. Still pretty bad, though. I feel terrible for all the people who lost their livelihoods because of the disaster.

  8. #8

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    ISA | Natural oil leaks equal to 880 Exxon Valdez spills

    This is an interesting story, I wonder if the seeping from Santa Barbara can be compared to the leak in the Gulf. More importantly, I wonder if the microbes discussed in the article can be adapted to help withe recovery in the gulf?

    " 20-25 tons of oil have leaked from the seafloor each day for the last several hundred thousand years."

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Traemo View Post
    Out of curiosity, from where are you deriving that centuries estimate? I will concede the estimates for discharge are high, but the ability of nature to remediate hydrocarbons isn't precisely nil, either.
    i diont thing mage is just talking about this disaster, the hydrocarbon fuels trade has continued since the industrial revolution, and we have affected vast tracts of land.

    ---------- Post added at 10:16 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:16 PM ----------

    and we apparently plugged the spill

  10. #10
    Butterfly Mage

    Default

    The Prince William Sound still hasn't fully recovered from the Exxon Valdez spill. That was a much smaller catastrophe. What BP essentially did was slice open one if the planet's arteries, and then is marvalled at the fact that the bleeding of oil can't be fixed by a band-aid.

    My guess is that none of the politicians are going to use the "drill baby drill" mantra any time in the near future.

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