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Thread: Source Control, IDEs, editors and what not

  1. #1

    Default Source Control, IDEs, editors and what not

    There are a good few programmers on adisc, some of them quite advanced, and some of them just starting out. And there has been discussions before on people's choice of programming language. But there's been less discussion on the other parts of programming.


    So, what IDE/editor, Source Control programs and other tools do you like to use while programming?

    For my editor, I'll use any of vim, Notepad++ or gedit. I like VS, but don't do enough Windows programming to use it much. Eclipse is horrible for anything that isn't Java.

    For source control, I use git, mainly because github is awesome. I used to use svn, but sourceforge and google code aren't on the same level as github.

  2. #2

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    I like to create websites and programs. For webpages, I use NotePad ++, and for programs, I use Code::Blocks (C/C++).

    Unfortunately I don't have much time to practice C/C++ (and I really need it), so I'm still a beginner LOL.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by LittleFox93 View Post
    Unfortunately I don't have much time to practice C/C++ (and I really need it), so I'm still a beginner LOL.
    Tell me about it. I keep meaning to learn C++ with results like so:

    • Relearn syntax as I've forgotten it again since last time I used it.
    • Write a few trivial programs.
    • Try write something more complex.
    • Struggle, get bored, move on
    • Repeat a few months later


    No other language has ever given me such difficulty.

  4. #4

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    For Web development I use NuSphere's excellent PhpED IDE, and Subversion (because git wasn't really popular when we started using Subversion, and I can't really be arsed to switch, learn how to use git, then teach everyone else how to use it).

    I used to use Zend Studio as my IDE, but then they switched to being a weird Eclipse plugin type thing, which was utterly horrible. It was much slower, used a ton more RAM, and removed half of the features. Best upgrade ever!

    For my occasional Qt/C++ work, I just use QtCreator

    I also have Visual Studio installed, but that only really gets used for XML editing.

    (And, yes, I have full, legal licences for each of the above, if applicable [i.e. not for QtCreator])

    That said, I'm also fairly happen doing small edits in vim. I do my development work on a Windows box, but the files are saved straight to Linux servers, so occasionally it's more convenient to edit the files directly in vim. I don't understand these people who insist that they can create entire websites/programs using vim alone. If you're doing that, you either have the best memory ever or you're only creating very small/simple sites :p You can't create sites that utilise 100+ classes if you're just using vim...

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Badger View Post

    That said, I'm also fairly happen doing small edits in vim. I do my development work on a Windows box, but the files are saved straight to Linux servers, so occasionally it's more convenient to edit the files directly in vim. I don't understand these people who insist that they can create entire websites/programs using vim alone. If you're doing that, you either have the best memory ever or you're only creating very small/simple sites :p You can't create sites that utilise 100+ classes if you're just using vim...
    I created a social network site, using PHP in Notepad++. IDEs for dynamic languages suck compared to those for static languages. Take intellisense. If you type
    Code:
    somevar.
    in VS for C#, it knows that somevar is a Window for example, and can give you a method listing. If you turn around and use aptana for PHP, and you type
    Code:
    $db->
    , the IDE has no way short of running the code to tell that it's a MySQLi object.

    Two of the other advantages, code snippets and syntax highlighting are provided by text editors aswell.

    Code organisation (such as finding out which file the MyFancyDbWrapper class is in), can be achieved by common sense. If class X is used, with no corresponding include statement, that means it's part of my own code, and in my classes folder, in PHP. Names help a lot too. Compare DBM to Database for a class name. The second is far more informative, and gives you a basic idea of what to expect.

    So, while IDEs do help, they're not the only way.

    There's also the risk of newcomers learning the IDE, not the language/framework, especially for any that handle GUIs.

  6. #6

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    There is only three IDEs I've every only spent more than over 10 hours using each.

    One is Netbeans, I enjoyed this when I learnt how to use java. It made my life easier, it also showed me how good IDEs are. I will continue to use. My only problem I still have today is that If I pull the source code out of it, I can't compile via command line. Typically using a SWING applications. But it hasn't stopped me from using it. I've made a couple of java *shivers* applets with it.

    Second is MPLAB, Microchip's IDE for embedded C. I don't like it's text editor at all. I'd rather I have a vim like editor for it. And it lacks any function/module tracking feature to suggest methods and it's output type and argument inputs like netbeans did.
    But it's debugging features make up for it though. That's the only reason why I put up with it.

    Third is MatLab! whatever it's editor is called. It's not too helpful in suggesting what to do while coding a line, however does track and suggest improvements, but mostly performance based ones. I've only recently started to use the debugger, and it's got one or two nicks I have with it in that you can't kill a code from running in debugging mode. You have to remove all break points, run, then kill. Not kill while it's paused.

    However I still use vim allot. And Badger, I'm one of those people who use it to make websites with. Then again. I just have multiple files open at once and keep flicking back and forth. Not the best and I'm looking for something better.

    I find it convenient as I can use vim remotely. But I feel That I need to change my habbits and find a decent IDE that will work well with python. I've been wanting to give eclipse a go. Especially for C/C++ work. When I started to learn to program with python, I was using DrPython, I'll have to say, it's a pointless and useless text editor. I just found it hard to work with and helped you very little, if at all.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hex View Post
    If you turn around and use aptana for PHP, and you type
    Code:
    $db->
    , the IDE has no way short of running the code to tell that it's a MySQLi object.
    And running through & parsing the code is exactly what Zend Studio and PhpED do. In my current PHP project for work, we have 57k lines of code (not including 38k lines of comments and 12k blank lines, nor the 60k lines of third party libraries) and 276 classes, but PhpED has parsed all of that and created an internal, per-project list of classes and such so that it can do full code completion (i.e. IntelliSense, or Code Insight, as PhpED calls it). It will also know what type most object variables are by either looking further up the code for a "$foo = new Bar();" line, checking the PHPDoc @return line of a method that was called to create that variable (e.g. "$foo = Bar::fromBaz(...);"), looking at the type hinting and PHPDoc @param lines of the current method (if the variable in question was passed as an argument to the current method), or by looking at the PHPDoc for the variable itself (allowing you to just write "/** @var Bar */ $foo;" if you want to force a variable to be considered an object of some class.

    There's no way that I could memorise the intricate details of those 276 classes, and constantly referring to those files would slow me right down, so PhpED makes my life a hell of a lot easier.

    As for learning the IDE rather than the language, that can certainly be true to some extent, but I think that it largely only applies to creating GUIs and the build process (for compiled languages). I'm not sure that an IDE can hide the actual code from anyone to such an extent that they're learning the IDE rather than the language, except with GUI code.



    Quote Originally Posted by UnMarth View Post
    However I still use vim allot. And Badger, I'm one of those people who use it to make websites with. Then again. I just have multiple files open at once and keep flicking back and forth. Not the best and I'm looking for something better.
    It depends on what sort of web site you're creating. I suppose I meant web application rather than web site, since I'm talking more about the aforementioned 60kloc project that I'm doing at work, rather than relatively simple, largely-static websites with a couple of dozen pages...

  8. #8

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    I've used MSVS, Netbeans, Eclipse, command line and Komodo. This list is in order of my preference. I don't care about pure text editors. Typing is not an issue for me, but code support can help a lot.

    As for source control, I've been meaning to try GitHub, but it never seems to happen.

  9. #9

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    Pretty much vim and vim alone these days (well, MacVim). That, combined with either Subversion or Git along with GNU Autotools make me happy for pretty much anything. I still use TextMate for LaTeX and HTML, though, but I've got a "snippets" plugin for vim now that might give me the impetus to consolidate.

  10. #10

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    There does seem to be a lot of programmer-types on here, I wonder if there's any connection.

    My programming consists of one computer science course in C++, and the occasional tweaking of the source of quantum chemistry software (probably have to learn fortran at some point). If I'm making a program from scratch, I like to do it in XCode on my laptop, if I'm just tweaking, I usually use jEdit, because it's the same on my mac and linux machines. My skill level is pretty low, so I haven't really needed much in the way of source control.

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