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Thread: The weight of actions past

  1. #1

    Default The weight of actions past

    I was wondering what people's opinions were on how important your past actions should be on your life. For people out there like Chris Brown and my uncle who was abusive i'm sure they would like to move on from their past. It is my belief that people can and do change sometimes and in those cases i don't think it's right that their past actions weigh so heavily against them. People like ex-convicts trying to live life morally would kind of understand this i guess. Anyway my question is where do we draw the line on the responsibility some one should take on an action that they are truly sorry for? Should this action or these actions really have to haunt them for the rest of their lives?

  2. #2

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    I'm not sure on the subject but I do know that Micheal Vick is screwed for life and lets face it our genoration is the one that will be talking about Micheal Jackson and it's in my opintion 90% of people will pass on the whole "child toucher" thing.

  3. #3

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    I do think that some penalties are too severe for the crime, such as drug possession and theft... but other crimes, such as murder, molestation or rape, I'm not so sure about... I guess the murder is arguable, depending on circumstance, but that really isn't the case with molestation and rape, unless someone lies, which happens. Those people generally don't change, and being sorry doesn't change the fact that you did it.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by glassyeyedbb View Post
    I was wondering what people's opinions were on how important your past actions should be on your life. For people out there like Chris Brown and my uncle who was abusive i'm sure they would like to move on from their past. It is my belief that people can and do change sometimes and in those cases i don't think it's right that their past actions weigh so heavily against them. People like ex-convicts trying to live life morally would kind of understand this i guess. Anyway my question is where do we draw the line on the responsibility some one should take on an action that they are truly sorry for? Should this action or these actions really have to haunt them for the rest of their lives?
    These are some really good questions, with no easy answers, unfortunately. The things that we (you or your uncle, or Michael Vick, or me)have done in our past are a part of us, woven into the fabric of our lives. People who have done some terrible deed, and paid their debt to society and their victims (prison and /or restitution) still will carry the knowledge that they DID those things, and, whether they are truly "sorry" or not, will have to deal with the mental "fallout"(poor self esteem, guilt, etc..) of having chosen to act in that particular way.

    Personally, I think it should weigh heavily on them. If they are truly reformed, it will serve as a reminder to never walk that path again, and use every day as an opportunity to earn back the respect and trust of others.
    Last edited by Lil Snap; 03-Dec-2009 at 14:17. Reason: Others have filled in the gaps!

  5. #5

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    Past actions are good indicator for future ones, generally. So if you've been jailed once for burglary, don't be surprised if I'm not quick to invite you to my house.

    Obviously people can change, and people who are genuinely sorry for past actions should be forgiven and helped to turn their lives around. Even for serious crimes, like murder, do I think this is true.
    How responsible are people for their past actions? I'd say fully, but that doesn't mean they should be haunted by past mistakes all their lives.

  6. #6
    LilLillyKitten

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    I've done some things in my past that I deeply regret, but it gets easier each day... The worst part about it is that I've done pretty much everything I can do, (And it has cost me two very good friends...) but I still don't feel like I've done enough; and what's more is that I'm terrified of it catching up to me.

    I'm sure I'll be forgiven for my trespasses long before I forgive myself for them...

  7. #7

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    I'm pretty content with my past actions. Sure, I've been short with people from time to time, but that happens to everyone at some points. Never really had any legal trouble, only a running a red light ticket, oh and a fake id once (having to be 21 to drink, but only 18 to die in war is outrageous, but that's another thread).

    Aside from that, I pretty much do unto others, I "post no bills" so to speak, so I'm pretty happy. Also, I'm fairly forgiving, and I let a lot of the little stuff slide, life's too short to sweat the small stuff, that's my feeling.

  8. #8

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    I can't really offer too much input on this. I have never done anything illegal,never drank underage, never done drugs, basically no legal trouble ever. So, my input offers nothing i guess. But there are certain things you can have a second chance on, but others (Rape, molestation, murder) not a chance!

  9. #9
    LilLillyKitten

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    Why is it impossible for a second chance to be given in those instances?

  10. #10

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    Everyone, and I mean Everyone, deserves a second chance. Should they be held accountable? Absolutely, but that doesn't mean they don't deserve the chance to move on, and try to rectify the situation they were in previously.

    I don't think people should forget about their own past, nor do I think we should have to ignore others pasts, but give people a chance. Everyone is capable of change, but it's up to them to take the chance.

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