Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 44

Thread: Switzerland bans minarets

  1. #1

    Default Switzerland bans minarets

    According to Al-Jazeera, and the BBC, the people of Switzerland have passed what we in the US would call a referendum banning any new construction of minarets(Muslim prayer towers).

    Al Jazeera English - Europe - Minaret ban wins Swiss support
    BBC News - Swiss voters back ban on minarets

    People in the Muslim community feel that this is an attack on their religion, while non-Muslim swiss feel that the towers are symbols of things incompatible with swiss values (such as Sharia Law, forced marriages, etc). Do you think this represents a growing xenophobia in Europe, or a rightful rejection of values anathema to your own (or the swiss, in this instance)?

  2. #2

    Default

    it's happened before that (christian) church bells have been banned/confiscated in Muslim countries. intolerance goes both ways i guess.

    isn't switzerland very predominantly christian? with the growing Muslim population in Europe, xenophobia probably isn't a far off guess

    it'll be interesting to see how this develops.

  3. #3

    Default

    Read this in the paper today. I think out of the 900 mosques in Switzerland, a grand total of three of them have minarets.

    I love the reasoning behind this too. "We don't want everyone in Switzerland turning Muslim, so we're banning you from building towers on top of your churches."

  4. #4

    Default

    This most certainly represents growing xenophobia and hatred in Europe. The Minarets are not harming anyone, nor do they enforce Sharia law or forced marriages. This law will do nothing to combat Islamic Extremism. It will not make radical Muslims more moderate or make them accept non-Muslims. All that the new law does is persecute Muslims and forbid them from practicing their religion in a harmless manner.

    I very strongly believe that the government has no right to restrict the free exercise of religion, or to give preference to one religion over another. While Ilsamic values may contradict the values of the majority of the swiss people, the majority should not be able to oppress a minority like this.

    I can't say I'm surprised to hear this, however. There seems to be a widespread, deep-seated hatred of Muslims in Europe. Switzerland is a very xenophobic country and their immigration laws are among the strictest in the worlds, so it does not surprise me that they persecute Muslims as well. This sort of thing makes me glad I live in the USA, where the First Amendment to our Constitution would forbid such a law. Our government certainly violates the First Amendment and makes religiously motivated laws in some cases, but it seems to be much more common in Europe.

    What makes this even more rediculous is that all the bans of Minarets, Islamic Clothing, etc. will do nothing to stop Islamic Extremism, forced marriages, Sharia Law, Islamic Terrorism, the abuse of women, or any of the other problems proponents of these laws claim they will. All they do is outlaw harmless expressions of faith, and they may very well cause resentment within the Muslim community, leading to more support for the Radical sects and movements within Islam.

    ---------- Post added at 04:13 AM ---------- Previous post was at 04:11 AM ----------



    Quote Originally Posted by krebstar View Post
    it's happened before that (christian) church bells have been banned/confiscated in Muslim countries. intolerance goes both ways i guess.
    .
    Two wrongs do not make a right. I would hope that the Swiss people would not want to sink down to the level of the Radical Islamic Theocracies.

  5. #5

    Default

    Speaking as someone who is a big fan of secularism, specifically maintaining a separation between church and state, Muslims demanding that their religion be included too is one of the best things ever to happen. In Canada, we've been having a bit of a mess the last couple years over Sharia courts and arbitration. Well, I tell ya, there's NOTHING that will turn someone from a rabid "Put the 10 commandments in every courthouse and prayer in every school!" nut in to a "keep religion out of my government!" activist faster than realizing that Islam will sneak in the same door as Christianity.

    That said, this kind of stuff will just fuel the same social engineering tactics that led to the whole riots-over-cartoons thing.

  6. #6

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Yocky View Post
    Two wrongs do not make a right. I would hope that the Swiss people would not want to sink down to the level of the Radical Islamic Theocracies.
    Oh, I wasn't trying to imply that it's justified. I get the feeling that a lot of people will denounce the Swiss gov't for this, and denounce they should. Just wanted to point out that this kind of intolerance is not unique to either group.

  7. #7

  8. #8

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Yocky View Post
    I very strongly believe that the government has no right to restrict the free exercise of religion, or to give preference to one religion over another. While Ilsamic values may contradict the values of the majority of the swiss people, the majority should not be able to oppress a minority like this.

    I can't say I'm surprised to hear this, however. There seems to be a widespread, deep-seated hatred of Muslims in Europe. Switzerland is a very xenophobic country and their immigration laws are among the strictest in the worlds, so it does not surprise me that they persecute Muslims as well. This sort of thing makes me glad I live in the USA, where the First Amendment to our Constitution would forbid such a law. Our government certainly violates the First Amendment and makes religiously motivated laws in some cases, but it seems to be much more common in Europe.
    I hate to point this out, but the late 1980s called. They miss you.

    I hate to point it out because I wish that we weren't backed up against insular and xenophobic tendencies, and losing what cultural identity we have here in the USA. However, we are, and rural Iowa is fingering their firearms and wanting to return to localized, isolationist doctrine, while urban Iowa continues to select those from outside Iowa over those from within--unfortunately, to the detriment of the state budget (e.g. the recent tax chaos regarding the movie folks).

    Europe is much older, so has a much more established traditional and history of operation. Consider, again, rural Iowa. If we suddenly sent a Bostonian around wearing leather wingtips to collect firearms, there would be significant upheaval--and this from only a couple hundred years of shared history. Consider now people speaking a different language, doing things differently, and moving into a neighborhood with six hundred years shared history.

    I think part of this is human nature, part of it the inability to "do as the Romans" when in Rome, part of it an unclear picture regarding conquering versus occupying a country.

    In thinking about your "the majority should not be able to oppress a minority like this" statement, I heard second-hand from a former friend who grew up in the Altoona area that he didn't know what would happen if a woman should (God forbid) wear pants to church rather than a dress; when asked, he thought that a homosexual would be strung from a tree or worse.

    *hums "Tradition" from "Fiddler on the Roof"*

  9. #9

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Yocky View Post
    This most certainly represents growing xenophobia and hatred in Europe.

    There seems to be a widespread, deep-seated hatred of Muslims in Europe.
    I do wish people wouldn't talk about Europe in such broad, generalised and simplistic terms. It is not one homogeneous blob but an extremely diverse area of some fifty countries with wildly varying attitudes, traditions and cultures. Switzerland is arguably the most introspective, detached and isolationist state in the continent and is also one of the most politically distinct and atypical, so the actions of this one small country do not a sweeping wave of xenophobia across Europe make. Indeed, it is almost impossible to talk of trends that are commonly European; attitudes and opinion in Dublin can have remarkably little to do with those in Zagreb, which in turn are quite distinct from those in Athens, which are markedly different from those in Moscow, and so on.

    I can only tell you that there is not a "widespread and deep-seated hatred" of Islam in my particular patch of Europe and ask you not to make such silly sweeping assertions that ignore the realities of a very complex and diverse part of the world. It would be like me saying that there seems to be a widespread and deep-seated hatred of gay people in North America because homosexuality is illegal in Jamaica. Foolish, no?

  10. #10

    Default

    I saw an article on this last night, and the whole concept just struck me as absurd.

    My understanding from what I have read in the American news media is that the campaign against minarets was based on the idea that they are a "symbol of Islamic terrorism".

    Wat?

    That's like saying that stained glass windows are references to the Christian-initiated crusades, or that backpacks are references to school shootings or that levies are references to Hurricane Katrina. It does not logically follow that an object connected to a group is a symbol of the rare atrocities by members of that group.

    Intolerance is just so terribly irrational.

    I can help but feel the similarity between this and homosexual marriage's voter box failings in California and Maine. Voters have an incredible tendency to respond to outlandish claims that play to their fears of the unknown. The unifying message against gay marriage used to swing voters in both states was the idea that "gay marriage will be taught as acceptable to your kids at school", which isn't something to fear unless you can't stand the possibility that your kid might not grow up sharing your intolerance.

Similar Threads

  1. Hello from Switzerland!
    By DaddyJo in forum Greetings / Introductions
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-Feb-2009, 09:40
  2. Replies: 36
    Last Post: 09-Nov-2008, 01:37

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
ADISC.org - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community.
ADISC.org is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.