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Thread: Religion and Myers Briggs Personality Type

  1. #1

    Default Religion and Myers Briggs Personality Type

    After reading some comments in a few topics about religion on the Adisc board recently, it got me thinking about some things, particularly some things I’ve been reading recently in a few books I got about the Myers-Briggs personality types. This will probably be a really long post, so I don’t know who will read it…but it was on my mind and I wanted to share it.

    First off, I know a while ago there was a topic where people could taken an online quiz and figure out which personality type there are. I also know some people said that psychologists don’t think it’s an accurate measure and isn’t worth a whole lot. But for me, not only was my own description dead on, but through reading these books I really felt I’ve learned a fair bit about myself and more importantly, about other people and how I’m quite different than them.

    So, I’m not trying to make blanket statements about everything and saying that someone’s personality type tells everything about them. In fact, the books I’ve read have said the same thing…that personality type is merely a natural preference and that there are many other factors that make up who a person is. However, I really have noticed trends about the types among people I know, and I really think there is something to the whole concept, even if it’s not perfect.


    So, for those that have never heard about the whole thing, it basically says that in four different categories, every person has a natural preference of one of two things in the categories (even though every person will have elements of both). The four categories are Introverted/Extraverted, Sensing/Intuition, Thinking/Feeling, and Judging/Perceiving. Here’s the general breakdown of the four categories.

    Introverted(I)/Extraverted(E): This is probably the easiest one to understand and see in people, though it’s not necessarily a measure of how shy or how social someone is. The real test of whether someone is an introvert or extravert is where they get their energy from.

    An extravert gets energy from other people. This is why after a hard day’s work, they would prefer to spend some time with friends and they can hang out with larger groups of people for hours. They actually lose energy by being alone because their thoughts can overwhelm them and they need an outlet.

    An introvert, on the other hand, gets re-energized by having some alone time. Being around other people, particulary groups of other people, wears out an introvert. That’s why they can only stand being in large groups of people for short amounts of time before desiring to be alone…so they can re-energize.

    Sensing(S)/Intuition(N): This is probably the hardest one for most people to place themselves and also the hardest one to see in people.

    Basically, a sensing person is more concerned with the details of things. A sensing person is more concerned with the present and everything around them…they’re more concerned about reality and realism and what is (or in some cases what’s been done in the past). They notice the details of situations and what’s going on around them, often following a process in a sequential order of steps.

    An intuitive person is more concerned with the big picture and what could be. They don’t notice the details of a situation step by step….they rather look at the whole thing and piece it together from all angles. They tend to be more idealistic and think about how potential problems could be solved using new innovations…sometimes at the expense of the moment. But overall they’re more concerned with the future than with the present.

    Thinking(T)/Feeling(F): This isn’t necessarily how rational/logical someone is compared to how emotional they are. A thinking person can have strong emotions and a feeling person can use rational thought just fine. However, the main difference is which one of the two is their general preference for making decisions.

    Thinking people tend to be more objective…to make a decision, they look at all of the facts of a situation and choose to make the decision based on how the facts logically fit together. Even if the decision is viewed as harsh or people’s feelings get hurt, they stand by the decision that makes the most logical sense to everyone objectively.

    A feeling person makes decisions much more subjectively, based more on their own feelings/values as well as the feelings of others. They tend to take into account how everyone feels and is affected by a decision moreso than what the logical reasons for the decision is.

    A thinker in general has an easier time critiquing problems and flaws in something no matter how it makes someone feel, whereas a feeler tends to empathize more with people and be more sympathetic as to how a decision with make others feel. Again, a thinker will make the best objective decision and a feeler will make the decision that fits into their own personal feelings/values more.

    Judging(J)/Perceiving(P): “Judging” does not mean judgmental or evaluative, and “perceiving” does not mean perceptive or insightful. This category more refers to how people organize things, particularly time.

    A judging person likes to have everything in order and likes to make decisions so that they can move on. They want to have things settled and decided. They like consistency and knowing what to expect. They’re more planned out and organized and have a hard time adapting to last minute changes.

    A perceiving person is much more adaptable and “plans on the go.” They would rather things be open-ended and undecided…they hate to be strapped down and forced to make a decision on something. They go with the flow a lot more and don’t have to have everything organized. They may even thrive on change, viewing it as exciting. A lot of times commitments seem negotiable.




    Now, like I said, everyone clearly has elements and aspects of both sides in all four of the categories….no one is 100% introverted or intuitive. However, everyone does have a natural preference for one of the two sides in each category, even if that preference is minute. When it comes down to it, they’re going to be more comfortable in the side that they have a natural preference for, and in general the way they see the world is guided by that preference.

    Take me for example: I am clearly an ISFJ. I’ve very introverted….I get quiet in big groups and I have to have some alone time to recover after spending time with other people. I’m also clearly sensing…I have a hard time viewing the future and the big picture of things…I’m a lot more concerned with how things affect me personally at the moment. I’m also a feeler…my feelings very often trump my rationality when I make decisions about things, and I have a hard time hurting other people’s feelings, whether it would be the right decision to or not. Finally, I’m definitely a judger…I’m much more at peace with having everything planned out and knowing what to expect. I love making decisions and moving on, and I hate last minute changes. Some people view me as boring because I’m not as adaptable and I don’t like to change from my routines.

    One great thing about the books I’ve read is that they’re very clear in saying that no one of the two choices in each category is overall “better” than the other…they are equal, yet different. Each side has their own strengths and weaknesses.

    What’s really interesting is how much friction and conflict there can be when people are on opposite sides of any one of the categories. An extravert may not understand why I need time by myself, and I may not fully understand their need to be around people a lot. In fact, I could never picture myself getting drained by being alone or energized by being in a big group…I really have to use my imagination to picture how they feel.

    I also have a hard time looking at the big picture, the future, and ideal solutions. I’m not innovative at all and I have to force myself to being interested in more than just the details around me. I can imagine how an intuitive person could be frustrated about my lack of interest in looking at everyone in the world and how they’re affected by things, and I can be frustrated with how they may not pay attention to details and individual situations.

    Thinking and feeling can definitely cause friction. A thinker can be boggled by how I may not always make the most objective, rational decision and may think I care too much about hurting people’s feelings. I, on the other hand, can sometimes be hurt by a thinker’s decisions/comments, even though it’s not their intentions. I may believe that they are too cold-hearted and don’t take into account how their decisions affects people personally.

    Finally, sometimes perceivers can drive me nuts. When I want things settled, they can’t make a decision. They want change and excitement and view me as boring, whereas I’m worn out and unsettled by their need to mix things up. I’m too rigid for them and they’re too unorganized for me.



    It’s fascinating to see how these things can affect people in so many different ways, particularly in school, at work, in dating relationships, and in parent/child relationships. But the one I’ve noticed more recently is how this can play into how someone views religion.

    I myself am a theist, more particularly a Christian. My personality type is also ISFJ. Now, certainly all sixteen different combinations of the four categories can yield people of all kinds of different religious backgrounds. However, I think that there are certainly connections to people’s natural personality preferences and which religious views fit best with themselves.

    Being an SFJ, the idea of a religion suits me very well. As a J, I like organization and structure…I like having rules to follow and having a guideline to go through. I also get peace in having decisions settled instead of keeping them up in the air. In addition, being an S, I like to focus on how things affect me personally rather than looking at them on a global scale. Finally, being an F…when making decisions about religion, I’m more apt to choose something that feels right to me rather than the one that makes the most logical sense.

    It’s also interesting to read about the 16 personality types in books, because my ISFJ description says that I live to do work for others and serve them. I get pleasure out of putting others before myself and staying committed and loyal to something.

    So, the concept of Christianity is very appealing to me. The idea of serving a God and following a set of rules gives me peace and comfort. I get the same thing from the idea of having a personal relationship with God. I also am more apt to believe this way because it feels right to me and makes me feel good, even if everything in the religion doesn’t make logical sense all of the time.

    However, it’s easy to see how an NTP would have many more problems with organized religions. As an N, they’d be more concerned with how religion affects people across the globe, noting the wars that have been caused by it and the pain and suffering it has inflicted. As a P, they’d also be more open to alternate possibilities and not feel the need to make a decision on the existence of a god or if certain rules are the right ones. They would also have more problem following this organized set of rules anyway. Finally, as a T, if the concept of a god or a religion didn’t make logical sense to them, they would be less apt to follow it, no matter how it makes them or anyone else feel.


    I bring all of this up because…I really think it can explain why people are so baffled by other people’s religious beliefs. We always have a tendency to say “Well, everyone has a right to believe how they want” but we personally think someone else’s beliefs might be crazy and we don’t see how or why they would view the world that way. For some with less control, they might even insult, abuse or hurt others simply because they view the world in a different manner.


    So I think it’s been really helpful for me to understand that as much as we have in common as people, there are a lot of things that are different about us, and these differences aren’t bad. We might view them as bad in other people because they go against our natural preferences. But if we understand how someone else is naturally different, we can see how their beliefs make sense to them.


    I’ll use me as an example. When I first converted to Christianity about ten years ago, it was one of the best choices I made in life. I was at peace because I found something that worked for me and I got so much joy, peace and satisfaction out of it. Due to my natural need to serve others, I wanted as many people as possible to get the same experience that I did and get the same joy and satisfaction. So, I greatly supported the idea of people sharing the idea of Christianity and “converting” them.

    Now, being an introvert, I’ve never felt comfortable doing this myself…particularly if the other person was resistant to the idea. However, for a long time I was in full support of other people doing it, because I felt that even if someone else was resistant to the idea at first, it would be worth it if they felt the same joy and peace that I did from converting to Christianity.


    However, over the last few years, in talking to people of different religions, I came to the realization that not everyone was bound to get the same positive effect out of it that I did. I realized that because of the way they viewed the world, a different set of beliefs would give them satisfaction.

    But it wasn’t until I started reading these books that I’ve come to understand WHY they may not get the same pleasure of the religion that I do. It’s helped me see more about what makes them tick that makes everything make sense to them in a different way.




    Now, I’m sure most of us here are of the belief that everyone has a right to believe what they want, and that we have no problem with someone believing whatever they want when it comes to religion. Most people mainly just have a problem when someone else tries to force their religion on someone else.


    And that’s why it was so beneficial for me to really understand how different others could be from me. I viewed convincing people to believe the same as me as a good thing because I thought they were like me and would get the same happiness that I did. I really had to understand them to see that this wasn’t the case. And even though I know a lot of people force their religion on others for the sake of power, greed, arrogance or manipulation, I also think some people do it because they simply don’t understand that other people aren’t like them. They may have good intentions but just not understand that they may have a negative affect.

    But I think it can go in the other direction too. Someone can think that religion in general is stupid because it doesn’t fit into their own preference of how they view the world. They can cause the same hurt and irritation by not understanding how something meaningless to them can be very important to someone else.


    Because, even though I may be wrong, but I bet that some people are completely baffled by someone else’s religious beliefs, and we don’t truly try to understand why someone else believes as they do. Even if there was a topic where people shared their beliefs, most of us would be apt to read the responses with little interest and just think “well, that’s nice”. We wouldn’t truly try to see why someone else would believe so differently. And the reason why would be that due to our personality types, their beliefs may completely go against our natural preferences and it would make us uncomfortable to step outside of them to understand that someone else could be so different.

    So, as long as this has been, that’s why I made this topic…in hopes that we can all not just realize, but try to understand WHY people can have religious beliefs that are so different than our own. Not just to think “well, they have a right to believe whatever they want” but to understand how their entire view of life and who they are can greatly relate to those beliefs.

    As *B/DL’s we’re often very frustrated because people don’t understand our natural feelings and preferences in this lifestyle. But how often do we do the same thing to other people? If we want others to understand us, shouldn’t we also have the desire to understand others? I really think that so much anger, hurt, and problems in the world comes from this lack of understanding, and I hope that as long as this post has been, it either generates some interesting responses or at least helps someone to think about this understanding.

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    Aww, I thought there would be a personality test at the end, which would tell me which religion best matched my personality. Now I am forced to invent my own one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Raccoon View Post
    Aww, I thought there would be a personality test at the end, which would tell me which religion best matched my personality.
    Well, I don't think it's that simple...there are tons of other factors that influence what religion someone ends up being, and like I said, I'm sure every religion and belief system has people of all 16 types. My main focus was really just on how people see the world differently.

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    Well Teddy, as long as this post was, I certainly enjoyed reading it .

    And sure, for those who want to take a test here, lol: Personality test based on Jung - Myers-Briggs typology. That's where I took it.

    Anyhow, you and I are pretty similar Teddy, but I suppose Carl Jung could tell me he knew exactly why we're similar . I'm an INFJ, according to that test, so that's just one area 'off'. While I agree with a great deal of what you said in this amazing awesome post, I have just a few comments, or other ways of seeing things.

    First off, as I do have that 'N' part in me, where you have the 'S', I can personally say that I don't blame religion for the wars and tribulations of this world. Why would it be to blame? It's clearly the religious extremists who are at play in those regards. Religion, in and of itself, is a very personal decision. Fighting breaks out when people take what is their own personal decision and, as you said so yourself, assume that everyone else should view things the same way. If that person is intensely passionate, they may even take to more physically evident ways in showing their distaste for people who believe differently, and the whole thing can snowball and avalanche straight into wars.

    I guess the feelings (as I like to make decisions based off of those, like writing this response) I get from what you wrote, is that people are inevitably going to feel tension when around people of different personality types. I agree with that in a very large way. I am always having problems with my extroverted older siblings. They simply don't understand why I want to spend so much time to myself, and I can't believe they are able to be as constantly social as they are. It just baffles me.

    However, I just think there is more to a person than their personality type. There is a certain level in which we as human beings can make decisions and do things that defy and go against all of our labels. When people utilize this to understand what others feel about a situation, and learn to understand how this world needs all types to keep functioning the way it does (whether we like it or not), then people are able to overcome this tension.

    This society needs every personality type out there to fulfill all of its critical positions. I do feel that people will find the best level of peace when they pick a career that fits their personality type.

    For instance, I currently work as a cashier in a grocery store. While this does work with my need for consistency and routine (very repetitive job), it is an overall terrible fit for my personality. I need to have alone time, and to spend time in meditation. That just simply doesn't happen when I'm on the registers; I'm basically chained to that drawer for 6-8 hours, which is torturous to me. While my Intuitiveness can be beneficial at times, there is a lot in a physical labor service job that requires step by step visualization and needs me to be much more in tune with what is going on around me than I am. Also, although my feeling personality is helpful in a service job, to want to make decisions that benefit other people, it is detrimental when it comes to 'bending' the rules. When someone's coupon is expired, for example, I really want to find some way to honor it, because their inability to read and follow the date printed on the coupon (LOL) plays on my sympathies and causes me to really feel bad about the situation. But, rules can't be broken....

    So, I have recently applied for, and am soon to be hired at my school's writing center as a one-on-one writing tutor. Ahhhh, magnifico. INFJ's often find their niche in two areas: writing and counseling. That is essentially what being a writing tutor is all about. It allows me to spend my days thinking about writing, which I love, and helping people on a one-on-one basis. I love helping others, I just can't deal with the constant bombardment I encounter on the registers. I can imagine so much less strain and tension with my new job. Which makes me very happy to finally be getting away from that grocery store.

    However, I didn't understand this whole thing until I looked into the personality types. It is important to 'know thyself,' which I now feel I know myself much better for knowing this.

    I just want to add, or restate, that people (or most people) do have an ability to trump their personality, just like an autistic person can sometimes trump their autism to reach out and try to communicate someone. I'm always so proud of an autistic person for doing that. Just want to give them a big hug because I know how hard that is. I have many of the same issues that autistic people do, so I understand a great deal of what they are going through.

    Sorry, got sidetracked, lol. Anyhow, I think a fair level of resilience and a look at how the world functions as a whole (I know, easy for an intuitive to say, right? lol) can overcome anger and tension caused by differences in personality traits. Great post, and wonderful idea Teddy. This woke me up this morning, and I thank you for that .

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    Very interesting!

    Personally, I find Fs (the feelers) very strange, and possibly annoying or dangerous!
    If I was working as part of a team, and we had to make a tough decision, I'd not be best pleased to have somebody start talking about feelings and start ignoring logic.

    In fact, thinking with feelings has really messed us up, especially in laws.

    Some examples:
    1) Gay marriage and gay rights. Logically, it seems clear to me that gays deserve the same rights that straight people do, and I'd really impressed if I saw a logical, rational argument against that view. But I haven't! It always feels wrong. It always feels unnatural.

    2) The death penalty, and punishment versus rehabilitation. The majority of the British public want to death penalty brought back! I think we feel as though it's a good thing, it feels right that we should kill murders and rapists. Punishment feels right. Rehabilitate thieves and druggies? No, they deserve to be punished!

    Bad decisions are made because people feel a certain way, and ignore logic (and even common sense).

    Personally, I think how we feel is produced by what type of society we grow up in. Ideally, feelings and good decisions would match up perfectly, and then feelings would be a useful thing to go on. But that's just me: looking toward the future, focused just on the big picture, typical N.

    Of course the religion thing is both good and bad. The moral virtues religions promote are obviously good, and are what I'm thinking about when I say "feelings and good decisions would match up perfectly".
    I'd hate to live in a logic world where people thought like this:
    "Should I steal this chocolate bar? Well... [logical reasons for stealing it], however [logical reasons against], so in conclusion [decision]."
    I prefer: "Stealing is wrong!"

    Obviously there's problems:
    "Should I have sex? No, sex is wrong!"
    "I'm gay? No, it's wrong!"

    I do empathise with Fs, and I understand why people like religion. As a J, I do like all the rules and stuff.

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    Quote Originally Posted by spddan View Post
    However, I just think there is more to a person than their personality type. There is a certain level in which we as human beings can make decisions and do things that defy and go against all of our labels. When people utilize this to understand what others feel about a situation, and learn to understand how this world needs all types to keep functioning the way it does (whether we like it or not), then people are able to overcome this tension.


    I just want to add, or restate, that people (or most people) do have an ability to trump their personality, just like an autistic person can sometimes trump their autism to reach out and try to communicate someone. I'm always so proud of an autistic person for doing that. Just want to give them a big hug because I know how hard that is. I have many of the same issues that autistic people do, so I understand a great deal of what they are going through.

    Sorry, got sidetracked, lol. Anyhow, I think a fair level of resilience and a look at how the world functions as a whole (I know, easy for an intuitive to say, right? lol) can overcome anger and tension caused by differences in personality traits. Great post, and wonderful idea Teddy. This woke me up this morning, and I thank you for that .

    You make a few very good points here. It's important to note that personality type is only part of who somebody is, not the overall definition. In addition, personality type only gives someone's natural preference ...it doesn't mean that it is the only aspect of them as a person. In fact, some of the books I read said that people need to be careful not to use their personality type as an excuse for their behavior, and like you said, there are times when we need to use our less preferable side. For instance, just because I'm a feeler doesn't mean that I never use logic. There are times when the better decision is based on logic.




    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie F
    Personally, I find Fs (the feelers) very strange, and possibly annoying or dangerous!
    If I was working as part of a team, and we had to make a tough decision, I'd not be best pleased to have somebody start talking about feelings and start ignoring logic.

    In fact, thinking with feelings has really messed us up, especially in laws.

    Some examples:
    1) Gay marriage and gay rights. Logically, it seems clear to me that gays deserve the same rights that straight people do, and I'd really impressed if I saw a logical, rational argument against that view. But I haven't! It always feels wrong. It always feels unnatural.

    2) The death penalty, and punishment versus rehabilitation. The majority of the British public want to death penalty brought back! I think we feel as though it's a good thing, it feels right that we should kill murders and rapists. Punishment feels right. Rehabilitate thieves and druggies? No, they deserve to be punished!

    Bad decisions are made because people feel a certain way, and ignore logic (and even common sense).
    I think there are are a couple of important things to be mentioned here.

    First off, as I said a little earlier, do keep in mind that a feeler isn't going to always ignore logic. As I said, it's important for everyone to find a balance in all four categories, and there are certainly times when logic should be used over feelings.

    The difference is...for a thinker, using this logic is a natural process. For a feeler, they have to go against their nature in order to choose the logical decision over the one they feel more strongly about.

    So here's the way I look at an issue such as gay rights...I've heard thinkers say time and time again the same basic thing as you have...that there's no logical reasoning against the support of gay rights and that people only have a problem with it based on feelings. But the problem is...if you don't understand these people, you'll keep on throwing logical arguments against them and even though a few people may change their mind based on that, a lot may not. The result is a thinker getting continuously frustrated and wanting to bang their head against a wall because they're getting nowhere.

    So the way I would look at it is to potentially find another solution and to give them another reason to change their mind on gay rights. And that would be to appeal to their emotions and feelings rather than their intellect. Remember, just because someone's a feeler doesn't mean they have a problem with homosexuality, and even if somebody originally does, it's not like their feelings are locked in for the rest of their lives...their feelings about the issue can certainly change. So, for instance, if you make someone realize what it feels like for someone to be gay, beyond their own personal choosing, and not be allowed the same rights as others...if they make that connection, they may be more sympathetic. Or if they understand and connect with the daily emotional difficulties a gay person goes through, they may sympathize with their situation more.

    My point is...the more you understand someone and how they're different, the easier it is to show them a new way to approach an issue or situation.



    As far as the death penalty goes...I've actually seen it happen in the opposite manner, where the thinking person is in favor of the death penalty and the feeler is against it. The thinking person (especially if they're a judging type) may believe that the death penalty is merely justice, and that one person who takes many lives should justifiably lose theirs as a punishment. A feeler, on the other hand, may sympathize with the murderer, seeing his remorse and believing that if he's willing to change his ways, he should be given mercy.


    So it's always important to realize that two thinkers may reach different conclusions about any situation or issue and that two feelers may reach different conclusions as well.




    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie F
    Personally, I think how we feel is produced by what type of society we grow up in. Ideally, feelings and good decisions would match up perfectly, and then feelings would be a useful thing to go on. But that's just me: looking toward the future, focused just on the big picture, typical N.
    What's also really interesting is that with your N qualities, some of the first things you thought of concerning Thinkers and feelers were large scale issues such as gay rights and the death penalty. Don't forget that thinking and feeling also plays a huge role in day to day relationships such as friendships, dating/marital relationships, and parent/children relationships. Emotions are very important in these kinds of relationships, and thinkers sometimes run into difficulty with them because they value the choices that make the most sense rather than valuing how these choices affect how people around them feel.

    NT's in particular sometimes run into problems because they may not do things to make people feel better, they may try to solve people's problems rather than just listen and the let the other person vent, and sometimes they make simple every-day matters into analytical debates. This can cause distance in relationships and produce stress and frustration in the NT.



    Anyway, that was my side tangent. I was talking to Mako last night and we did discuss how in certain situations, particularly political large scale ones, it is more important to be objective rather than subjective since the decision affects many people.

    And that's why even though I'm a Christian and an F, I still support the idea of separation of church and state and I don't have a problem with science/evolution/big bang theory etc. being taught in public schools. However, to come to that conclusion, it helped me a lot to understand how different people operated and particularly how they were different than me.



    So basically...no matter what your type is, it's important to understand how others are different than you and how sometimes it's better to let your non-preferred side be the one that you use.

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    I'm a Wiccan and I tested as INFJ.

    Of course, the whole Christian anti-gay thing comes from the fact that they worship a book that says it's okay to hate people who are different. Well, the bad ones do at least. I occasionally encounter a Christian that actually understands the notion that love is more important than hate, and that one should fix one's own life before judging another's. Sadly, Christians like the latter make up a VERY small minority amongst their faithful.

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    I never really paid too much attention to the whole Myers Briggs thing, but feeling a little curious, I looked in to it. The whole thing just seems like a sham to me. Smacks of astrology all the way. According to wikipedia (and the first page of google results for 'myers briggs double blind'), this thing has never been double-blind tested. The only validation it has right now is people filling out tests, looking at the results and thinking "hey, that describes me!". Problem is, the Forer Effect (also known as the Barnum Effect) causes people to kinda shoehorn any personality test to fit them. Doesn't matter if it's astrology, graphology, handwriting analysis, or some other stuff someone has thrown together.

    James Randi has a rather famous experiment where he concocts some new personality test. Doesn't matter what it is - picking random words from a list, drawing your favorite animal, throwing noodles at a wall, could be anything. Then, come up with a result that is slightly kinda vague and around 75% of people will say that the 'personality type' you've come up with fits them pretty well.

    Here's a good summary of everything that makes me think the whole Myers Briggs thing is garbage. Includes a good summary of Jung's typing theory (the basis for this test) and why it's pretty much crap, too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bgi39jsjw0ggg View Post
    I never really paid too much attention to the whole Myers Briggs thing, but feeling a little curious, I looked in to it. The whole thing just seems like a sham to me. Smacks of astrology all the way. According to wikipedia (and the first page of google results for 'myers briggs double blind'), this thing has never been double-blind tested. The only validation it has right now is people filling out tests, looking at the results and thinking "hey, that describes me!". Problem is, the Forer Effect (also known as the Barnum Effect) causes people to kinda shoehorn any personality test to fit them. Doesn't matter if it's astrology, graphology, handwriting analysis, or some other stuff someone has thrown together.

    James Randi has a rather famous experiment where he concocts some new personality test. Doesn't matter what it is - picking random words from a list, drawing your favorite animal, throwing noodles at a wall, could be anything. Then, come up with a result that is slightly kinda vague and around 75% of people will say that the 'personality type' you've come up with fits them pretty well.

    Here's a good summary of everything that makes me think the whole Myers Briggs thing is garbage. Includes a good summary of Jung's typing theory (the basis for this test) and why it's pretty much crap, too.

    I'll be honest in saying that I don't personally like the idea of someone taking a test/quiz to figure out which of the 16 types that they are...to me that misses the whole point of what I was trying to make. As I mentioned at the beginning, I'm not trying to say "Hey, this is a perfect description of everyone! Everyone will fall into one of these 16 groups."

    I'm much more in favor of having someone looking at each one of the four categories and seeing if they naturally have a tendency to be one way or the other. I'm sure a number of people feel pretty even in at least one of the categories. But for most people that I've talked to (and just observed), they see themselves as having a preference for one side or the other, and they know someone who seems to be the opposite of them.


    And again, I'm not looking at all of this through an analytical scientific mindset...I'm not looking at this as a theory to prove or disprove. I'm using it as an opportunity to showcase that we're not all alike, and we have a tendency to think that others are more like us than we really are.



    And what I really think has made the whole thing appealing to me is...a lot of times it feels like society expects us to conform to be one way or another, and not ourselves. The US in general is a very extraverted culture, and a lot of times you get the impression that it's "bad" to be an introvert, and that you should be going out and socializing all of the time. My whole life I've had the impression that that's the case, even though I've always personality felt fine being an introvert...it just felt weird for me to naturally be me.

    It's the same thing with me being a feeler instead of a thinker. I get tired of people telling me that it's wrong or stupid of me to let my feelings dominate and that I should always use logic to trump them. That's honestly like telling me to change what kind of music or movies that I should like.



    So I'll be honest...I don't care if every psychologist does claim that the test is worthless...because it hasn't been worthless to me. And at the end of the day that matters to me more.

  10. #10

    Default

    I'm ENTJ. I've had a very hard time with religion as a whole before I started asking my partner about his religious background. I couldn't understand why there was so much hate for something that should be good. I believe that too many Christians have moved away from Christs teachings.

    The church I go to takes the bible as the foulable word of God, it's not correct everytime. There are two stories of creation in the first 13 pages of the bible - which one is correct? I would say both to a greater degree but both are ridled with problems.

    I still do not like most Christians, they use religion as a tool for control and abuse. When I see and ichthus on a car it makes me upset. What are you trying to say? I'm a better Christian than you because I stick some emblem on my car.

    To quote Ghandi "I like your Christ. I do not like your Christians, they are so unlike your Christ."

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