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Thread: Facilities...*Please Read*

  1. #1

    Default Facilities...*Please Read*

    First off let me say, I'm not daytime urinary incontinent. I am an occasional bed wetter, and I suffer from IBS, which often leads to accidents, thus I wear diapers almost all the time when in public. One of the biggest things I hate is bathrooms that make it difficult to change, either because they don't have a trashcan, the stalls are very small and cramped, or there isn't a changing table in the stall to at least put your things on. I know not everyone prefers changing laying down, but I do I feel I get a better fit. I feel there needs to be a push from both incontinence groups and special needs groups for facilities that accommodating the millions of incontinent and diaper wearing Americans. I'm glad to see family bathrooms starting to become more common place but they are far from in surplus. And while they are good they still don't offer what many places overseas do, and that would be a surface to change on. I'm not necessarily asking for those big fancy expensive changing tables, but maybe just extending the counter tops used for children by 36" so they might accommodate an adult or special needs person. I think the first step is increasing awareness. I feel that awareness can be increased politely and professionally. Here is what I think we should do. We should each contact new businesses and new construction project along with popular large locations like malls and send them something along the lines of the following;

    Dear Business Owner,
    I am a local resident and one of the more then 15 million Americans who suffer from incontinence. So as you build or open your new business you may consider a unisex/family bathroom that can accommodate one person or a person and their caregiver. Or perhaps you may want to install a larger changing surface to not only serve as a changing surface for children but also adults and those with special needs. Changing tables that accommodate adults and special needs children are also available on the market. Other things you may consider are at least one stall being larger and able to accommodate a person and possibly a caregiver if needed. At the very least it is asked that you would consider installing at least one trash container so that disposable products may be disposed of properly and in a respectful way to other patrons. Incontinent Americans and those with special needs already suffer the embarrassment of their problem, and truly do appreciate and go out of their way to patronize business that make their life a little easier. I thank you for your time and hope you take these things into consideration. Best of luck with your business.

    Regards,
    local resident


    Ok folks what do you think?

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by wheelman21 View Post
    ...perhaps you may want to install a larger changing surface to not only serve as a changing surface for children but also adults and those with special needs. Changing tables that accommodate adults and special needs children are also available on the market.

    Other things you may consider are at least one stall being larger and able to accommodate a person and possibly a caregiver if needed.

    At the very least it is asked that you would consider installing at least one trash container so that disposable products may be disposed of properly and in a respectful way to other patrons.
    Asking for more single bathrooms means that the places won't be able to accommodate as many people who need the facilities, unless you're suggesting that they build three bathrooms. Places that have the typical multi-toilet bathroom are usually places that are busy and have a lot of people going through them. Most restaurants (at least around here) have single bathrooms and some places even require you to ask an employee to open the door. The idea of an adult-sized changing table is just... erm, weird. It wouldn't fit well in said single-person bathroom anyway. Every bathroom I've been in has had one large stall (handicap sign hanging or attached to it). And most all bathrooms have trash cans. Am I not reading this right? It seems like the changes you're suggesting are very self-serving and unnecessary. The only real complaint you have is that you have to change standing up, but it seems to work fine for everybody else. An incontinent person would plan ahead or be wearing a good enough diaper to last through the day, I'd think.

  3. #3

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    And who the hell do you think is going to end up paying for this? The cost of construction, knocking down other stalls, installing, etc. always ends up back in the ass of the consumer. So, I'd vote no. Social awareness...like how ABs want social awareness, right? No. No awareness. It embarrasses people, and someone will *always* ruin it for everyone. Since you mentioned that you wear diapers in public, why not keep your load in there until you can find somewhere else?

    In conclusion: NO! I end up paying for it in the end. >:|

  4. #4

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    Ok before you rip me to pieces do a little research. As for asking for single bathrooms, new target stores are all being built with a mens room and womens room, and a family room for babies and special needs. Almost any new airport has the same, and several even have adult changing surfaces, one of which is Phoenix Arizona. Also if you look to Britain they have places called "changing places" which are bathrooms installed by private business owners and also in places like malls where people with special needs and diaper wearers can go to change. You can also look those up. So before you go ripping me to pieces, there are other places already doing these things. I don't want to start a fight, just float an idea. Geez

  5. #5
    Jeffy

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    Quote Originally Posted by BabyGrizzy View Post
    And who the hell do you think is going to end up paying for this? The cost of construction, knocking down other stalls, installing, etc. always ends up back in the ass of the consumer. So, I'd vote no. Social awareness...like how ABs want social awareness, right? No. No awareness. It embarrasses people, and someone will *always* ruin it for everyone. Since you mentioned that you wear diapers in public, why not keep your load in there until you can find somewhere else?

    In conclusion: NO! I end up paying for it in the end. >:|
    A kinda harsh, but concise version of what I think... Seconded, the end.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by wheelman21 View Post
    So before you go ripping me to pieces, there are other places already doing these things. I don't want to start a fight, just float an idea. Geez
    I'm just speaking from experience. I'm being polite as I can.

    Most new buildings, as you have said yourself, are doing this anyway. The problem is that you want people to shell out extra cash for another, or a more specialized, bathroom. If not that, then there's no point to tell them to do what they're already doing, right? If they can afford it then it'll probably be in there. Otherwise I'm sure that businesses would like to keep whatever money they can when making an already-expensive building.

    Also you can't really compare what happens in Phoenix to what happens in Britain - different cultures

  7. #7

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    If a bussiness were to consider rest-room renovations, and the costs they would incur, I think it would better serve their patrons to add more stalls for the females to use. The lines for the 'Ladies' room are always twice as long as those for the men. What's next ?, a shower, a full bath, a sofa to lounge on. This seems a very self-serving, selfish idea. I would not help to push this agenda, and I do not want to push for more " social awareness " for *B/DL individuals. Even if your lobbying effort was a success, the business owners who were pressured into making these changes would be seen, by the general public, as pandering to the demands of a very small minority. This would not turn out well for either groups, the business owners, those who are incontinent, and especially those in the *B/DL community. I am against the idea.

  8. #8

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    If the building is still in the design phase, I honestly don't see how putting in an extra single-user bathroom to accommodate those with special needs would hugely affect the design or construction costs of a building. I am honestly all for requiring that new public buildings include such facilities. I see it in a similar light as the building guidelines (per the Americans with Disabilities Act) that are already in place to accommodate people in wheelchairs, etc. These provisions are not incredibly difficult or expensive (the exception being elevators, which are costly) to implement when the building is in the design phase, but I imagine they make a world of difference to wheelchair-bound people who just want to be able to get around and go about their business. I have gone through the guidelines and designed buildings to accommodate it (student projects). Much of it is simple things like how wide a door or hallway should be, how high sinks/drinking fountains/doorknobs should be, how big the landings of a fire stairwell need to be, what the maximum slope of a ramp can be before it is dangerous/impossible to navigate a wheelchair on it (ADA Accessibility Guidelines). But these provisions are not something the average designer with functioning legs would think to include, in the same way that the average (continent) designer wouldn't think to include a single-user bathroom with an adult-sized changing table. Hence the guidelines that are in place to make up for such oversights.

    I don't think it would be unreasonable to require handicap accessible single-user bathrooms in all new public buildings, nor do I think it would be a stretch to include an adult-sized changing table (perhaps as an extension to the sink countertop). Keep in mind I am thinking of this from the standpoint of legitimately incontinent people (or carers of those who are incontinent)--if a few AB/DL people use it, fine, but AB/DLs would not be the intended user base. I read an article that kind of opened my eyes to this... it was written by a mother with a full-grown, disabled son in her care. He is incontinent and wheel-chair bound. He cannot go anywhere for more than a few hours without needing a change (yes, better diapers would help, but even an Abena X-Plus will only last so long), and a suitable place to change him is often not available. This severely limits his ability to go out and enjoy a lot of things all for lack of a place to get changed (standing up to change isn't an option, and restroom floors are... cramped in stalls and pretty demeaning). It's really such a simple thing that could improve the quality of life for many people. I'll try to relocate the article if anybody is interested...

    Retro-fitting an existing building is a different story--both money and implementation wise--however...

  9. #9

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    Tygon, your last sentence sums it up. My impression was that this was a drive to retro-fit existing structures. These additional accomodiations may not seem like much, but the costs to add them to an existing building would be considerable. Perhaps in a mall setting, where these costs could be shared by quite a few other establishments, it may not be unreasonable. For the smaller, mom and pop restaurants, convienence stores, and gasoline stations there is no way they could afford the renovations to accomodiate the needs of such a small percentage of their customers. If these elements were included from the start of the design and construction of a new building, the over-all costs would be minimal, but I think it would still be impractical to implement anywhere other than the largest of businesses, i.e. airports, large shopping malls, or amusement parks.
    Last edited by fifigal; 20-Nov-2009 at 07:12.

  10. #10

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    Larger Businesses often exceed the requirements of existing local and federal laws to accommodate customers special needs in these areas. A large (corporate store) Kroger in my area recently completed a major remodel of their restrooms. Between the Men's and Women's restrooms (Already ADA Compliant) they built a family/handicapped bathroom. I always go there to change my diapers when I am in town. It is completely discrete and private and has everything that I could ask for.

    I don't think these ideas are a bad suggestion, I just don't think they need to be mandated by federal law. Sometimes, in the case of private businesses, it just makes sense to provide these facilities. Of course they would have to have a large enough customer base to provide them. Oh, BTW, BabyGrizzy, you stated: In conclusion: NO! I end up paying for it in the end. >:| Actually you (the consumer) may NOT directly pay the cost for these amenities, because your patronage (and thereby, profits) go to the business providing the facility.

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