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Thread: New fish tank- need fish help!

  1. #1

    Default New fish tank- need fish help!

    XD k so I've currently got a 10 gal fish tank and I'm getting a 40 gal sometime soon hopefully. I wanna get a lot of pretty fishies but IDK how many i can get without "overcrowding" a tank to where it'd be dangerous for them. Extra clean up I can handle- I already clean the tank and change the water once a week as it is!

    I currently have:
    3 albino corydoras
    1 sunfire platy
    1 white skirt tetra (may see about trading it in at petco, if they allow it. I don't like him, mom wanted him, and he needs a couple more fishies which takes room for other fishies i could have! XD )
    3 "guppies" (I plan on getting rid of those too, I don't like 'em and neither does mom. Got them free ><; )
    and a pleco.

    I want something small, so I can have several of them, and pretty XD blue is also a major win. Freshwater tank, saltwater is too expensive and brackish is hard to keep up with.

    I was thinking neon tetras...They're easy to care for, they're pretty and they're small. Anyone else have any ideas though? O: Also, how many could I get if i got neon tetras? x3 they're so pretty and bright, it'd be really fun to have a bunch of them! XD

  2. #2

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    I heard that one fish for every gallon is good. If you get tetra, you should get at least 3. I also thought that platy's had to be kept in multiples as well. I'm not a professional fish tank keeper or anything, but my boyfriend has kept one so I know a little bit about freshwater stuff. Hope this helps!

  3. #3

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    I have had a fish tank for several years now, tried several different combinations of fish. All freshwater, it's just easier and cheaper, though once own a home, I'd love a sweet salt water setup.

    First off, you sort of can go by the rule of 1 inch of fish per gallon. This is somewhat true of slender fish. If you get fish that may not be long, but are larger in girth, you'll need to consider each inch of fish equal to about two gallons. These fish take up more room, and produce more waste. Also, you'll have to take into account how big the fish can grow. When you see them in the store, they are generally pretty small, as for many fish, it can take a year or longer for them to get to large size, and generally these fish will grow to whatever size the tank can hold. For example, the oldest fish in my aquarium is a tiger barb, and I've had it for about 4 years, so it's probably 4-5 years old. Their average lifespan is about 6 years, so it's probably towards the end. At the present time, it's about four inches, though was only one inch when I bought it.

    Aside from that, you want to make sure that your fish are going to work well together, make sure they are from the same family. If you like tetras, there are many types, and generally they go well together, as to goldfish with other goldfish.

    Yes, neon tetras are pretty neat, but if you have any fish that are even slightly aggressive, they will be eaten quickly. Trust me on this one, I've tried the neon tetra route on more than one occasion.

    Also, you'll want an algae eater. I like the black kind, I don't know their actual name or anything, but they are the black ones, not the green ones. They are very easy to maintain and can live in a variety of climates. Both that I've had have lived for several years, and do generally get bigger. I don't feed them any special algae wafers or anything, and they've been fine.

    Hope this helps. Good Luck.

  4. #4

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    The one fish per gallon is a good average. You can get a few more of the small schooling fish like neons, and danios. They're fun to watch school. You also have to be careful about socialization. Some fish don't get along with others, so the only South American ciclids I would get would be an angel fish. They are quite docile.

    When you get your 40 gallon tank, you will have a lot more options. I had a 50 gallon tank and had South American Ciclids such as a Firemouth, a Green Terra, an Oscar, a Red Devil, a Jack Dempsy, and and Alligator Gar. They all had to be fed goldfish, however. That may not appeal to you. If you don't want large fish, you can get a lot of the smaller fish like Gouramies, Silver Dollars, etc. You should go out and get a good book at your local pet store. There also is a lot of info on the net.

    You also should get a chemical kit to test water quality. The water will cycle through ammonia, to nitrites and nitrates. You will need to keep some buckets of water to do partial water changes. It takes a lot of work.

  5. #5

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    actually angelfish are fin nippers, so with the tetras I wouldn't mix them. xD

    I want some small fish so I can have some mini schools ^^

    I've got a pleco, that's an algae eater. x3 I dun want big fish cuz I dun wanna have to feed them little fish D: that makes me saddd T-T

  6. #6

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    I miss my fish tank... had to give up raising fish when I had problems with my apartment and my air conditioner and a heat-wave killed my fish back in June of '99.

    I have a nice once too... All plastic, clear and easy to clean too. My old glass tank broke cause of a bitch security guard at my apartment complex who loved to harass me, and knocked on my door as I was getting the tank ready to be dumped. I dropped it. UGH.

    Fortuantely I had the money to replace my tank. I miss raising fish.

    WildThing121675

  7. #7

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    We had a tank with African cychlids. We liked them because they are very colorful (almost as good as saltwater fish, if you have "good" cychlids) and pretty low maintenance. We also had one plechy (algae eater). A few things to be aware of with cichlyds - they are very aggressive, so they don't play well with others (often including each other); they like hiding places, so lots of rocks are good (10 gallon tank probably wouldn't work well for more than two); and they are mouth brooders, so if they begin to breed as ours did, you will need to provide some protection for the babies after they swim out of mom's mouth or they will be eaten.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sila View Post
    XD k so I've currently got a 10 gal fish tank and I'm getting a 40 gal sometime soon hopefully. I wanna get a lot of pretty fishies but IDK how many i can get without "overcrowding" a tank to where it'd be dangerous for them. Extra clean up I can handle- I already clean the tank and change the water once a week as it is!

    I currently have:
    3 albino corydoras
    1 sunfire platy
    1 white skirt tetra (may see about trading it in at petco, if they allow it. I don't like him, mom wanted him, and he needs a couple more fishies which takes room for other fishies i could have! XD )
    3 "guppies" (I plan on getting rid of those too, I don't like 'em and neither does mom. Got them free ><; )
    and a pleco.

    I want something small, so I can have several of them, and pretty XD blue is also a major win. Freshwater tank, saltwater is too expensive and brackish is hard to keep up with.

    I was thinking neon tetras...They're easy to care for, they're pretty and they're small. Anyone else have any ideas though? O: Also, how many could I get if i got neon tetras? x3 they're so pretty and bright, it'd be really fun to have a bunch of them! XD
    One fish-inch per gallon is typical, but not always precise.

    A CYCLED 10-gallon tank can handle:

    • 4 Neon Tetras
    • 2 Corydoras catfish
    • 1 Ottocinclus catfish


    Or
    • 4 Cardinal tetras
    • 2 Cory cats


    Or
    • 1/3 of a plecostamus (pleco)


    Your tank is already overstocked, as you may know.

    Sila, I'd pull the pleco and go with otto cats instead--they do a much better job in algae-cleanup, and aren't as likely (IME) to go after other fish for their slime-coat.

    Plecos can reach 18".

    Over the years, I've had:
    • Mated pair of German Blue angelfish (5" dia. - installed R/O system for these guys);
    • Mated pair of discus (7" dia. - installed R/O system for these guys);
    • 1 apple snail (the bugger reached softball size before I pulled him into his own tank);
    • 1 16" pleco;
    • 1 6" gourami;
    • 3 clown loaches (7");
    • 5 tiger barbs (5-6"; these were HUGE);
    • 1 clown loach (6-7");
    • 2 yoyo loaches (3-4");
    • 7 cardinal tetras (3");
    • 1 South American pufferfish (2");
    • 8-10 zebra tetras (2.5")


    My favorite tank is one with mid-swimming, schooling fish and a bottom-swimming layer. A sand-bottomed aquarium with a school of 4-5 cardinal tetras and one yoyo loach would work. But yoyos, like others in the loach family, have skin--which makes treating for ich really difficult.

    Here's what I would advise, all things considered:
    • 1 corydoras catfish
    • 2 ottocinclus catfish
    • 5 cardinal tetras


    This tank will be hardy against ich should you become infested. Rather, should your fish become stressed enough for the parasite to gain a foothold.

    Keep up on the water changes, and remember to vacuum the gravel a bit with each water change (10-15% water change once a week is better than a 20-30% water change once every two weeks).



    Quote Originally Posted by dogboy View Post
    You also should get a chemical kit to test water quality. The water will cycle through ammonia, to nitrites and nitrates. You will need to keep some buckets of water to do partial water changes. It takes a lot of work.
    Naw. Well, it depends. I got to the point where I could drag my Python around and do partial water changes on my 55G, 20G (breeder), 44G (tall), and 29G (tall) tanks in about a half-hour or so. It's all about keeping up with it, and that's precisely why I ended up selling everything off the year before I wrote my M.Sc. thesis.
    Last edited by h3g3l; 26-Aug-2009 at 15:29.

  9. #9

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    Get a few angel fish then they will be lots of room in your tank, they eat anything they come in contact with.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by ballucanb View Post
    Get a few angel fish then they will be lots of room in your tank, they eat anything they come in contact with.
    Angels are aggressive and two easily outgrow a 10G tank.

    They're cichlids, remember.

    If you get two, they'll fight and nip until they're both used up. If you get three, they'll usually harass one to death, at which point they'll fight and use each other up. If you get 5+, they can co-exist, but a 10G tank will not support that.

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