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Thread: Affect of diapers on career choice?

  1. #1

    Default Affect of diapers on career choice?

    I am going through one of those phases again, where I consider the possibility of wearing (though not using) 24/7.

    I need to have some closure on this part of myself, so I am trying to construct a chart to weigh all the pros and cons in such a decision.

    What I want to ask about is how diapers may affect one's career choice, because I do not have any experience here.

    For example, is it possible to go into medicine (say, a physician or psychiatrist) or higher-education jobs? Can somebody be fired for incontinence?


    I do feel worried that the choice to wear diapers could change which careers I choose to pursue, and I would like to have an informed decision...so that when I make my decision several months (or years) from now, I know what I am headed into.

    (Not that I immediately plan to make such a large decision, but I want to have a LOT of time to think it over and figure out who I want to be; I will continue to build this chart over the next year or so)


    If you currently hold such a higher-education job, I would be especially pleased if I could hear your answer.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kif View Post

    For example, is it possible to go into medicine (say, a physician or psychiatrist) or higher-education jobs? Can somebody be fired for incontinence?
    Legally speaking, at least here in the United States, the short answer is no, you can't be fired for incontinence. The long answer is also no. However really in any occupation discretion is going to be the key. If you need to wear, well then that's a health issue and employers are required, I believe by the American's with Disabilities Act to make reasonable accommodation.

    Personally, I would bet money on the fact that there are going to be professionals in all fields, doctors, lawyers, professors, you name it who are incontinent and do wear diapers out of need on a regular basis.

    The thing you need to keep in mind is that discretion is key. I personally would think that if you go in wearing hugely noticeable cloth diapers with visible baby print plastic pants, well that might raise a red flag or two. However, if you are keeping it to yourself and taking the steps possible to make sure that people don't notice, then you should be fine. I would say that if you needed to change at work, keep your spare diapers out of general view, a personal bag would be fine, and throw out used ones in a sanitary manner, you know all the regular stuff.

    Fact of the matter is, 99% of people won't notice a thing, unless it's in their face. I would liken that to say, going to Wal-Mart. I guarantee you that at just about any given moment, based on statistics, there's a good chance that just about any given day if you are out and about in shops, in public, etc, that you are running across at least one other person wearing a diaper under their clothes, but we never notice it.

  3. #3

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Ace View Post
    Legally speaking, at least here in the United States, the short answer is no, you can't be fired for incontinence. The long answer is also no. However really in any occupation discretion is going to be the key. If you need to wear, well then that's a health issue and employers are required, I believe by the American's with Disabilities Act to make reasonable accommodation.

    Personally, I would bet money on the fact that there are going to be professionals in all fields, doctors, lawyers, professors, you name it who are incontinent and do wear diapers out of need on a regular basis.

    The thing you need to keep in mind is that discretion is key. I personally would think that if you go in wearing hugely noticeable cloth diapers with visible baby print plastic pants, well that might raise a red flag or two. However, if you are keeping it to yourself and taking the steps possible to make sure that people don't notice, then you should be fine. I would say that if you needed to change at work, keep your spare diapers out of general view, a personal bag would be fine, and throw out used ones in a sanitary manner, you know all the regular stuff.

    Fact of the matter is, 99% of people won't notice a thing, unless it's in their face. I would liken that to say, going to Wal-Mart. I guarantee you that at just about any given moment, based on statistics, there's a good chance that just about any given day if you are out and about in shops, in public, etc, that you are running across at least one other person wearing a diaper under their clothes, but we never notice it.
    Yeah I'm just going to have to quote him and agree completely. Because that's literally about it.

    Not a whole lot more to say really. As long as you keep yourself under control and clean - then no one would know and thus no one would care.

  4. #4
    Darkfinn

    Default

    I'm not medically incontinent... though I consider myself to be Functionally Incontinent... it's a mental thing.

    Anyways... I would imagine that most jobs are diaper friendly. After all, there are lots of people in the world with a legitimate need... and I don't hear about them being prevented from doing things because they lack bladder control.

    Actually, the Americans With Disabilities act protects the rights of incontinent individuals... now an AB/DL may not qualify... but I don't see a difference between someone who wears 24/7 because they want to, and someone who wears 24/7 because they need to.

    The only thing I can really see diapers getting in the way of is if you join the Military... as they have certain physical requirements.

  5. #5

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    That is great to hear, so far....


    I am making these decisions on the basis of a few rules:

    1) This cannot be made obvious to the general public, because it is viewed as offensive.
    1a) This cannot be done in front of my family, unless the current mode changes.
    1b) This cannot violate any existing laws.
    2) I must not feel any guilt associated with the decision, for it to be correct. (if I feel guilty about the decision, I cannot live with the decision happily)
    3) All decisions must be both logically and empirically informed--this includes consultation with others outside myself.
    4) I must tell the truth to myself and others.
    5) Decisions cannot be made emotionally unless the decision does not violate any of the above conditions.
    6) Any violation of the above rules terminates the original decision and requires re-evaluation.


    The ability to become a doctor, lawyer, or enter any other higher-educated profession has been one such concept that I feared would violate my first rule--and consequently would cause me a guilt that would violate the second rule. As such, if it were to propose a problem to my career, I would choose to take a different route because I value my career above all other things.

    It is good to hear such re-assuring comments on the matter.

    My plan has been to begin wearing diapers and to journal each day, and then to evaluate my journal entries on a weekly basis. If I discover that my decision violates any of the above rules I have set for myself, or that my journal entries reflect an overall-negative mood, I will stop what I am doing and have an answer for why I do (or do not) wear diapers.


    The one issue which bothers me is honesty.

    I take the same perspective as you, Darkfinn, in so much that I have an emotional/mental incontinence; I am always drawn to diapers, despite my efforts to escape them. And when I do wear diapers (and I don't have to use them!), I feel more confident and motivated. Thus, I would be willing to embrace it as a type of strange alternative incontinence.

    However, I do not feel that such a thought is honest. Without lying, what would I say to somebody who would ask about my diapers?


    No doubt, eventually I will be asked this question--and I refuse to say I am medically incontinent, unless such a condition was actually satisfied medically. Convincing myself that what I decide to do is correct is absolutely essential; I refuse to lie to myself or others.

    Only when I have felt guilty about diapers have I ever felt badly about them--and it is my intention to entirely remove this guilt through experiencing 24/7. Diapers have given me generally positive experiences, otherwise, and I need to know that wearing diapers is not a bad habit but simply a healthy and manageable preference to underwear. By removing the stigma associated with diapers, I believe I will free myself from this psychological itch...this "obsession", as my parents would call it.

    It is a part of me which will not go away, so why ought I try to resist this tendency, like one who prefers to write with the left hand? I should embrace it so that I can understand who I am, and to eliminate the guilt which defines such an "obsession".

  6. #6
    angelabauer

    Default Ada

    Before anyone assumes in the USA under all circumstances incontinence is covered by the ADA, check with a qualified and licensed labor attorney.

    Although such support organizations as The Simon Foundation for Continence considers any spontaneous voiding as incontinence, this is hardly an opinion shared by the mainstream medical profession. At law to be considered incontinent an individual will need substantial medical records of diagnosis and treatment. A note from a single physician is hardly ever effective.

    My recent search of USA Dept of Labor rulings cannot find a single case in which emotional diaper need was protected by ADA or any law or ruling.

  7. #7

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    I think there might be a few professions that could suffer from incontinence. The military being one, the other being working in places where privacy is hard to find. I know I couldn't combine wearing with my aviation plans - pilots sit still for too long and mostly don't have enough time too change during the day.

    There's always complications. Consider your future plans wisely and take a decision based upon that. Every scenario is unique.

  8. #8
    Darkfinn

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    Quote Originally Posted by angelabauer View Post
    Before anyone assumes in the USA under all circumstances incontinence is covered by the ADA, check with a qualified and licensed labor attorney.

    Although such support organizations as The Simon Foundation for Continence considers any spontaneous voiding as incontinence, this is hardly an opinion shared by the mainstream medical profession. At law to be considered incontinent an individual will need substantial medical records of diagnosis and treatment. A note from a single physician is hardly ever effective.

    My recent search of USA Dept of Labor rulings cannot find a single case in which emotional diaper need was protected by ADA or any law or ruling.
    *sighs*

    You... and your ever analytical legal mind... totally missed my point.

    Employers know of the existance of the ADA... and in most cases a simple statement of "I need to wear diapers." is enough to put off any further snooping. It certainly has been in my case. Whether this was a physical, mental, or emotional need was never explained... because noone ever asked.

    You can't find any cases of emotional diaper need being protected because none exist. Quit trying to make it sound all high and mighty and official.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by angelabauer View Post
    Before anyone assumes in the USA under all circumstances incontinence is covered by the ADA, check with a qualified and licensed labor attorney.

    Although such support organizations as The Simon Foundation for Continence considers any spontaneous voiding as incontinence, this is hardly an opinion shared by the mainstream medical profession. At law to be considered incontinent an individual will need substantial medical records of diagnosis and treatment. A note from a single physician is hardly ever effective.

    My recent search of USA Dept of Labor rulings cannot find a single case in which emotional diaper need was protected by ADA or any law or ruling.
    Given that the ADA also covers mental impairments, could a diagnosis of a paraphilia from a psychologist/psychiatrist qualify? The DSM still recognizes paraphilia as a condition, as far as I know - anything in the DoL rulings on that?

  10. #10
    Elli

    Default

    Incontinence might be considered an asset in the Fire Service.

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