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Thread: Art Help

  1. #1

    Default Art Help

    What things can I do to improve my art , to make it more cubby, and more suited to what i am trying to do, which is make cute looking furs that people like to see?

    Any Help would be greatly thanked.

    ps my art is at Userpage of firelupine06 -- Fur Affinity [dot] net

  2. #2


    Work on "rounding out" the image, you have too many sharp lines :P
    shading (ie when drawing a fox, lighter reds where a light source would show, and darker in the shadows) will also add depth, and make it more cartoonish
    idk if thats exactly the kind of answer ur looking for, but i hope it helps

    EDIT:im an anime artist so my own work will will undoubtedly be sharp-edged and rather flat...oh the hypocrisy :P
    i find (personaly) that as an anime artist, i am forced to rely heavily on seem to use a simular style to mine, so id say that shading would be ur best bet
    EDIT (good god im horrible): i dont want to go on to the point of being nitpicky...but ur "profile" (sideview) pics seem to have a definate outline on the face...a snout sticks out, keep that in mind, same as shading, will add depth and warmth
    Last edited by MistuhFox; 07-Jul-2009 at 22:43. Reason: adding detail, and a typo

  3. #3


    Hmm, well..

    Cubs are a lot stockier than adults, for one. Their heads should be rather large, and their limbs short and stubby compared to their bodies.

    Foxy has a present by fire_lupine06 -- Fur Affinity [dot] net
    This is good, for instance, very cublike in proportions and cute.

    Fire_lupine, the cub by fire_lupine06 -- Fur Affinity [dot] net
    This one's head is around 20% too small, and neck is too long. As a result, it looks a little more like a stocky and plump teenager.

    The size of the head is probably one of the key features in determining age, so be aware of that.

    Tigeris , the cub by fire_lupine06 -- Fur Affinity [dot] net
    Note the short limbs on this one, they are very good. The legs are only about one body length-short and stubby, and cublike. Legs on an adult are about twice the body length, for reference.

    Although not as important, appendage length is still important for a character's age.

    One tip. Do you add a 'skeleton' of circles and lines and such before you start drawing? If you don't, I'll say it's very helpful in plotting out body placement and correcting mistakes before they happen.

    I'll say that your generally high in potential, and mainly have to work on your drawing abilities and techniques. The rest will come naturally; you seem to already have a good idea of the underlying proportions and body structure. Your poses seem kinda stiff, though.

  4. #4


    Thanks, i added a new pic, trying a newer style , but got some of the sizing issues again I think, but thank you alot for the help Envy

  5. #5


    The best suggestion I can offer you is to set aside time every day to draw and to observe.

    If you draw every day, even if you do not feel like it, you will improve.

    And it also helps to sketch people and animals from photographic references. (if you cannot observe real things)

    And if you have any books, note what the book tells you to observe so that you can focus on one particular element.

    For example, I am currently working on drawing fabric wrinkles. The book has told me to note that wrinkles generally have anchor points where the wrinkles originate from--and they are located generally at the waist, arm pits, shoulders, deep crotch, and wherever there is a bend in the limbs (to be very superficial, mind you--but at least it is a starting point). Whenever I go out in public, I observe the wrinkles on people and take mental notes to myself. Then, I will sketch what I've observed.

    Your drawings do not have to be perfect masterpieces each time, so keep in mind that drawing is a process and to not become attached to a particular piece. I shall emphasize again--draw no matter what and do not worry about how your work compares to others.
    Unless, of course, you wish to look for inspiration.

    For example, if you want to soften a drawing, do not use black to outline the body; use earth/skin tones, instead.

    Remember that drawing is experimentation towards perfection. Just keep observing and learning, and keep patient.

    (and as far as chubbiness goes, try relaxing your lines; draw with your non-dominant hand or with your eyes closed. It is extremely helpful for loosening up and discovering your style--to get rid of those straight lines, for example...unless that is your style, of course ;-) )

  6. #6


    What I do is I look at other artist's work and analyze the details and transfer that to what I want to draw. I often look at Furry Jade Fox's work. Also try relaxing your wrist and work on making loose curves.

  7. #7


    Quote Originally Posted by Fire_lupine06 View Post
    What things can I do to improve my art , to make it more cubby, and more suited to what i am trying to do, which is make cute looking furs that people like to see?

    Any Help would be greatly thanked.

    ps my art is at Userpage of firelupine06 -- Fur Affinity [dot] net
    The best advice I can give you is this: don't draw like I do.

  8. #8


    ya like kif is saying just try spending a lil more time drawing. I like the way you color, and your proportions are there too. i think if you work on influencing more curves you'll gain that cute factor your looking for.
    Last edited by Codybear; 19-Jul-2009 at 02:29. Reason: link

  9. #9

  10. #10


    In the picture Ezra it looks as thought the muzzle is a bit to short for the head size. Try making the muzzles longer

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