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Thread: I want to be little... but I can't

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by gnd567 View Post
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    ^^^THIS RIGHT HERE!^^^ Somebody else does understand! Yes, I have had that fear all of my life that if someone found out and thought I was not mature enough to take care of myself and that I needed to be put somewhere. They'd probably never do it to me but I still have that fear in the back of my mind. It probably keeps me from regressing because I don't want to get caught that way. Somebody does understand!!! I've had that fear for as long as I can remember. I don't want that to ever happen.

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    Maybe. Dad drives me to and from work so I don't want to ask him for too much more.

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    Maybe I should. I've thought about it many times before. It would help and then I wouldn't be alone in public either, which is something that I've never really done. Plus, I do LOVE animals even though I am sometimes a little intimidated by large dogs at first until I get to know them.

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    Thank you. I know. It's just that I feel guilty and that I want more than I could ever give in return.

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    Thanks. That experience really hurt me. Especially after she left with my my now ex-best friend (we had a disagreement a few weeks prior to this event, the girl had nothing to do with it.) She even had the nerve to invite me to the wedding! Really hurt.

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    Thank you.

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    I won't. I just need to find some support.
    I was thinking maybe someone to drive you, who wasn't a parent, so they don't feel taken advantage of. Not that they do, more like, they know they aren't being taken advantage of. It'd be like, "Mom, dad, I love you. I love you so much, that now, driving me places is no longer your responsibility. I've hired this guy. Put your feet up, and know I'll be okay. You did a good job. It's break time now."

    It could be as simple as a paid friend, if you have a contract drawn up.

    Oh, heck yeah! With a cross-trained dog, not only wouldn't you be alone, you'd have a sighted leader, also trained to mitigate your anxiety! The difference between an Emotional Support Animal, and a Psychiatric Service Dog, is, ESAs can be more than just dogs, and they are only allowed in no-pets housing, and on flights. ESAs don't have full public access rights, because, they aren't disability mitigation work/task trained. An ESA makes you feel better, a PSD may, e.g., interrupt a suicide attempt, or, e.g., if the handler thinks himself, or herself, hallucinating, the handler may say, "Go say hi," and, if someone is there, the dog greets, nicely. If not, the dog goes in the direction of the handler's point, and, seeing no one, returns to the handler's side. Another example would be getting the handler to a safe place to have a panic attack, and doing Deep Pressure Therapy, for calming. See the difference?

    Again, heck yeah, you should! Your state was on your profile, so I did some looking, and you'll definitely need a professional trainer, but, there's no reason not to go for a private, non-program, trainer, as long as said trainer has experience with Leader/guide (not sure what the difference is, forgive me.) and Psychiatric Service Dogs. Is your anxiety issue diagnosed, and documented? Don't answer that. Just know, if not, you may have trouble justifying anxiety mitigation tasks, if it ever goes to court, which, it shouldn't, because, hell, you're partial blindness is.

    Now, your doctor's letter, it should be a thing. You don't have to, and, as such, shouldn't, show it in public. No registration, ID, certification, or proof of Assistance Dogness, is required by law. Why not? Because legally, they're not dogs, but medical, or psychiatric, equipment. Would you want Big Daddy Gubment knowing if you used an oxygen tank, because you had to tell them? No? I thought not. The reason for the doctor's letter is, should you end up in court, the doctor is basically saying, "Yes, he's disabled, and, yes, he should have an Assistance Dog. I'm cool with that," and that could keep them from having to subpoena your medical records. And, it's anti-dirty liar insurance, because, if someone fakes, and they prove it, then, the faker, and the doctor who lied, both go to jail. Because people's needs change, don't get too descriptive with it. Remember, "Yes, disabled. Needs an Assistance Dog. I'm cool."

    That way, if work, or someone does ask, you can show them, because it's vague enough to allow your needs to change. A guy on the news had his boss ask for a doctor's letter, and his was so specific, that when his seizures got worse, and he needed the dog at work, his boss sent him home, because his doctor's letter said that he didn't need it at work.

    "Yeah, but, my needs changed."

    "Too bad, go home!"

    See? Too specific.

    You should definitely keep a training log! For God's sake, training log, training log, training log! His basic, intermediate, and advanced training certificates, task training logs, his vaccine records, his rabies tag, the IAADP minimum standards for public access he's passed, his Canine Good Citizen thingy, if you decide to get it, keep it all, because, the appropriate time for a business owner to ask for it all, is during the training phase, so, have all that, for then, and for court.

    Get some flight experience during the training phase, too. I used to have a list of the best airline policies for SDiTs, but, apparently, stupid me deleted it. Don't worry. I'm on it! I'm officially wound up, in a good way! Once your 6 feet leave the ground, that's a different set of laws, under the jurisdiction of the Department Of Transportation, the Air Carrier Access Act. PSDs and ESAs require a doctor's letter, specifically mentioning the things the DOT has jurisdiction over, but, sense yours is also your eyes, you shouldn't need one, but, airlines do require some form of proof. Usually, clearly marked gear, like, for you, a rigid guide harness, should be fine.

    Once your 4-legged partner is active duty, the only 2 questions you can legally be asked, unless by a judge, are:

    "Is that a Service Dog, required because of a disability?"

    and,

    "What work or tasks has the dog been trained to perform?"

    For the record, those fancy Service Dog IDs prove nothing. The only reason they aren't illegal, is because it's just a dog ID, which every dog needs, with a law card on the back, and generic examples of work and tasks. I can see the appeal.

    "Yeah, um. . . This dog works for me. Here's a little legal information. Bring him home quicker, and in better health, than a pet, please, and, think twice before stealing him. Thank you."

    I think I'll make my own, with the answers to my 2 questions, the fact that he's chipped, and has a GPS tracker on his harness, the legal information, and, the fact that it's a courtesy, that keeps me from answering a million questions, and isn't required by law, on it.

    How's that for planning? I don't even have a dog yet, but, once he's more than a thought, alive, and with me, I can tell you, he's a Shiloh Shepherd, and, I changed my mind. His name isn't Keeneye; it's Dobby, and yes, he'll have clothes. He'll work for me of his own free will, and, handlers usually put their dogs in shoes, to protect their paws.

    Other things? Other things. . . Oh! Some places don't have to allow SD teams in, i.e., places of worship (Most aren't dicks.) the open air exhibits of zoos, no doggy swims in public pools, and, most of the time, ICUs and ORs, with a few rare exceptions, and a few others.

    Here's some information about housing. https://www.anythingpawsable.com/hud...-support-dogs/. The wording is a little different, because, landlords have to allow ESA's in, too, but, it's basically the same.
    Last edited by SpAzpieSweeTot; 1 Week Ago at 01:17.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpAzpieSweeTot View Post
    I was thinking maybe someone to drive you, who wasn't a parent, so they don't feel taken advantage of. Not that they do, more like, they know they aren't being taken advantage of. It'd be like, "Mom, dad, I love you. I love you so much, that now, driving me places is no longer your responsibility. I've hired this guy. Put your feet up, and know I'll be okay. You did a good job. It's break time now."
    Yes. I've considered this and its something I should seriously look into. I don't know where though.
    I could then possibly go to an ABDL munch and start meeting people, especially if I had a dog to help me get around and maybe to even break the ice.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpAzpieSweeTot View Post
    Oh, heck yeah! With a cross-trained dog, not only wouldn't you be alone, you'd have a sighted leader, also trained to mitigate your anxiety! Again, heck yeah, you should! Your state was on your profile, so I did some looking, and you'll definitely need a professional trainer, but, there's no reason not to go for a private, non-program, trainer, as long as said trainer has experience with Leader/guide (not sure what the difference is, forgive me.) and Psychiatric Service Dogs. Is your anxiety issue diagnosed, and documented? Don't answer that. Just know, if not, you may have trouble justifying anxiety mitigation tasks, if it ever goes to court, which, it shouldn't, because, hell, you're partial blindness is.

    Now, your doctor's letter, it should be a thing. You don't have to, and, as such, shouldn't, show it in public. No registration, ID, certification, or proof of Assistance Dogness, is required by law. Why not? Because legally, they're not dogs, but medical, or psychiatric, equipment. Would you want Big Daddy Gubment knowing if you used an oxygen tank, because you had to tell them? No? I thought not. The reason for the doctor's letter is, should you end up in court, the doctor is basically saying, "Yes, he's disabled, and, yes, he should have an Assistance Dog. I'm cool with that," and that could keep them from having to subpoena your medical records. And, it's anti-dirty liar insurance, because, if someone fakes, and they prove it, then, the faker, and the doctor who lied, both go to jail. Because people's needs change, don't get too descriptive with it. Remember, "Yes, disabled. Needs an Assistance Dog. I'm cool."

    You should definitely keep a training log! For God's sake, training log, training log, training log! His basic, intermediate, and advanced training certificates, task training logs, his vaccine records, his rabies tag, the IAADP minimum standards for public access he's passed, his Canine Good Citizen thingy, if you decide to get it, keep it all, because, the appropriate time for a business owner to ask for it all, is during the training phase, so, have all that, for then, and for court.

    Get some flight experience during the training phase, too. I used to have a list of the best airline policies for SDiTs, but, apparently, stupid me deleted it. Don't worry. I'm on it! I'm officially wound up, in a good way!

    Once your 4-legged partner is active duty, the only 2 questions you can legally be asked, unless by a judge, are:

    "Is that a Service Dog, required because of a disability?"

    and,

    "What work or tasks has the dog been trained to perform?"

    For the record, those fancy Service Dog IDs prove nothing. The only reason they aren't illegal, is because it's just a dog ID, which every dog needs, with a law card on the back, and generic examples of work and tasks. I can see the appeal.

    "Yeah, um. . . This dog works for me. Here's a little legal information. Bring him home quicker, and in better health, than a pet, please, and, think twice before stealing him. Thank you."

    I think I'll make my own, with the answers to my 2 questions, the fact that he's chipped, and has a GPS tracker on his harness, the legal information, and, the fact that it's a courtesy, that keeps me from answering a million questions, and isn't required by law, on it.

    How's that for planning? I don't even have a dog yet, but, I can tell you, he's a Shiloh Shepherd, and, I changed my mind. His name isn't Keeneye; it's Dobby, and yes, he'll have clothes. He'll work for me of his own free will, and, handlers usually put their dogs in shoes, to protect their paws.

    Other things? Other things. . . Oh! Some places don't have to allow SD teams in, i.e., places of worship (Most aren't dicks.) the open air exhibits of zoos, no doggy swims in public pools, and, most of the time, ICUs and ORs, with a few rare exceptions.
    WOW! Great information! Thank you SO much! I've thought about service dogs many times in my life but I guessI just never realized how much one could do for me. Seriously. I didn't know they could help me with much more than crossing the street or something but, wow. This could be what I need to finally stop feeling so stuck and finally find someone.

    I have a lot to think about.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by gnd567 View Post
    Yes. I've considered this and its something I should seriously look into. I don't know where though.
    I could then possibly go to an ABDL munch and start meeting people, especially if I had a dog to help me get around and maybe to even break the ice.

    WOW! Great information! Thank you SO much! I've thought about service dogs many times in my life but I guessI just never realized how much one could do for me. Seriously. I didn't know they could help me with much more than crossing the street or something but, wow. This could be what I need to finally stop feeling so stuck and finally find someone.

    I have a lot to think about.
    Be advised, I changed my second post a bit. Listen to it, or read it again. Also know that being a guide dog isn't enough. The dog has to behave like one, and, if your dog is being a little snot, you can be asked to leave. I can't find anything that says ESAs and PSDs need a doctor's letter, on anything other than a plane, but, I have heard of people having a hard time on other transportation, because they didn't have a letter, so, I figure that's a Department Of Transportation thing. Again, yours is also your eyes, so you shouldn't need a letter. This seems to be them blatantly not knowing what PSDs are, or, treating psychiatrically disabled people differently. It's being worked on.

    Sorry not to have information regarding SDiTs on airlines, yet. They seem to be changing their policies, a lot. You might just need to call each one and ask. Also, keep in mind Air Hollywood K9 Flight School. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=qiG7bDRWtfU

    I plan to get travel-specific gear with no metal in it, and a non-travel set.
    Last edited by SpAzpieSweeTot; 1 Week Ago at 00:52.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by SpAzpieSweeTot View Post
    Be advised, I changed my second post a bit. Listen to it, or read it again. Also know that being a guide dog isn't enough. The dog has to behave like one, and, if your dog is being a little snot, you can be asked to leave. I can't find anything that says ESAs and PSDs need a doctor's letter, on anything other than a plane, but, I have heard of people having a hard time on other transportation, because they didn't have a letter, so, I figure that's a Department Of Transportation thing. Again, yours is also your eyes, so you shouldn't need a letter. This seems to be them blatantly not knowing what PSDs are, or, treating psychiatrically disabled people differently. It's being worked on.

    Sorry not to have information regarding SDiTs on airlines, yet. They seem to be changing their policies, a lot. You might just need to call each one and ask. Also, keep in mind Air Hollywood K9 Flight School. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=qiG7bDRWtfU

    I plan to get travel-specific gear with no metal in it, and a non-travel set.
    Ok. I re-read it. I'm not sure what I'm gonna do yet but I will definitely do some research.

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