Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Society's expectations of boys

  1. #1
    dprdinky

    Default Society's expectations of boys

    I found an article of Goodnites which was intriguing about boys and how sometimes society's expectations tend to cause some problems, particularly if they are known to be a bedwetter.

    Also points out that boys take longer to overcome bedwetting compared to girls.

    A Guy?s Guide to Bedwetting : Tips for Managing Bedwetting from His Point of View - Bedwetting Articles from GoodNites®

    Would be interested to hear what some of you have experienced in this area, how bedwetting impacted you and how old you were when you were no longer a bedwetter.

  2. #2
    Darkfinn

    Default

    That article is really freaking biased... it shows how society is still trying very hard to define the "traditional" roles of boys and girls, from infancy on.

    ---One interesting facet about bedwetting and boys and how they differ from girls is in bedtime rituals. Dr. Huff says that girls tend to get into the same routine and boys tend to vary their schedules.

    "We know that kids who have a solid bedtime routine are better able to avoid bedwetting," says Dr. Huff. "In my experiences, I’ve seen that girls have a set of activities to get ready for the next day, whereas boys are involved in the moment."

    Dr. Huff recommends a consistent bedtime routine for boys that involves some structured time at least an hour before bedtime, and includes a time for limiting liquids and a time for going to the bathroom. The difficulty in that advice, Dr. Huff notes, is that she’s seeing more and more boys with overloaded schedules, even as young as kindergarten age.

    "I have seen boys who have every minute scheduled from 7 a.m. up until bedtime every night of the week," Dr. Huff says. "Sometimes, these kids haven’t had an actual meal or a healthy drink until 9 p.m. because they’ve been so busy, and they went through the drive-through for dinner, and someone handed out sports drinks at practice. This is how our socialization of boys is evolving and the boys buy into it because they see their friends doing it as well."
    ---

    Sorry for the long quote there... but aren't there just as many girls who are busy with sports or dance practice? Don't we rush all our kids around in the drive-through lifestyle? The advice in this article can be equally applied to both sexes... but we see here that it is being pushed on parents of male children.



    Tell me folks... in the past 40 years how far have we as a society really moved from the above pictures?

  3. #3
    dprdinky

    Default

    I'm not here about the article being "freakin Biased". You gotta think though that here is someone has done a study and the subject and has found some differences in how boys are compared to girls. I'm not sure if the person is generalizing or not.

    As far as the comic, we have changed quite a bit in our society, yet there are still some stereotypical observations that continue to exist.

    But that is beside the point, what I'd like to find out is has anyone experienced any of this growing up and being a bedwetter? At what age was it you stopped being one?

  4. #4
    secretdl26

    Default

    I would say that yes, the article is a little biased, maybe not.

    As for the comic, I think society has begun to move farther and farther away from those stereotypes, with images in media/real life reflecting greater gender equality. Just looking at my college's statistics, there are often more women in science than men at many colleges.

  5. #5

    Default Society's expectations of boys



    Quote Originally Posted by dprdinky View Post
    I'm not here about the article being "freakin Biased". You gotta think though that here is someone has done a study and the subject and has found some differences in how boys are compared to girls. I'm not sure if the person is generalizing or not.

    As far as the comic, we have changed quite a bit in our society, yet there are still some stereotypical observations that continue to exist.

    But that is beside the point, what I'd like to find out is has anyone experienced any of this growing up and being a bed-wetter? At what age was it you stopped being one?
    :bunny: Looks like people are having some difficulty responding to the OP's question without getting off on tangents - That aside, I'll try to stay on topic and respond to the question you posed dprdinky. ...has anyone experienced any of this growing up and being a bed-wetter? At what age was it you stopped being one? As far as I know, I was not a bed wetter, despite having a very small bladder, etc.- ever. This didn't mean I didn't experience a wet bed (nearly every night). The fact that I didn't wet the bed may have been out of sheer fear (of my parents). Read on. I'll explain.

    While growing up, my two older brothers and l lived in/shared a bedroom that measured 8ftX9ft = (72 sq. ft. - 24 sq.ft. per person). There were two twin beds in this room and a trundle bed that rolled out from under one of the beds.

    I was deathly afraid of the dark and had night mares, actually night terrors, every night. I was made to sleep in the trundle bed between my two brothers beds. The monsters in the closet and under the beds kept me crying most nights until I could finally get into my oldest (adopted) brother's bed and hold on to him with all my might (He was my protector).

    Finally, exhausted, (poor little guy) I would fall asleep.

    Most nights I would wake up cold and wet to a soaked bed. The bedroom light would get abruptly turned on in the middle of the night. My mother would be hitting my older brother (now 10 years old) repeatedly, screaming and swearing at him for wetting the bed. The sheets would be stripped from the bed and remade by my brother, as my mother continued to ridicule and humiliate him. Both of us, crying by now, would get dressed in clean pajamas and go back to sleep.

    This was my nightly ritual, until we helped my brother run away from our abusive home for good when he was 13. (He lived in the woods above our house for over a year while my brother and I would sneak food and supplies to him. (He lived there until a good friend of his tipped off the sheriff to his whereabouts and he was placed in foster care). But that is another tragic story.

    My night terrors continued, probably triggered by my mother and fathers' escalating violence and abuse, but bed-wetting never became an issue for me. One less thing to be ridiculed and physically abused for (although there always seemed to be other good reasons for both). :bunny:
    Last edited by Diapered Rabbit; 18-Apr-2009 at 15:13. Reason: corrections, punctuation, additions

  6. #6

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by dprdinky View Post
    I'm not here about the article being "freakin Biased". You gotta think though that here is someone has done a study and the subject and has found some differences in how boys are compared to girls. I'm not sure if the person is generalizing or not.

    As far as the comic, we have changed quite a bit in our society, yet there are still some stereotypical observations that continue to exist.
    Even so, anything from Goodnites you would have to expect to be biased. They'll pay any doctor to testify if it demonstrates something they want or would give a defense for diapers/pull-ups.

    As for the main question - I would say, for the most part I developed a way of sleeping very lightly when I was young. It would always take a long time to fall asleep, and I always peed before I went to bed. I never drank much after a certain point every night since I was a kid though...it was just what I got in the habit of...don't drink much before bed and pee before I go to bed. But I was talking to my sister a few months ago and she apparently remember I wet the bed some when I was little...although I'm actually losing more and more of my childhood memory as I go sadly...(I have my own issues and reasons...) And I know that I did end up at a urologists when I was 8 or 9 for a lot of tests...so I don't know...I guess that really doesn't give much information for or against...sorry.

  7. #7

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by Darkfinn View Post
    Tell me folks... in the past 40 years how far have we as a society really moved from the above pictures?
    and what does your asking the question tell you (rhetorical or not)? and what does the answer suggest?
    while we all know that there are lies, damned lies and then there's statisitcs, how many men died in the construction of the Hoover Dam, and how many women? do the answers suggest that women are safer construction workers?

  8. #8

    Default


    The quote from today (as in a few hours ago) is, girls retain their jobs, boys get laid off.

    On-topic, I would suggest that children of both sexes are getting run-down and burnt-out more readily now than before. I am surprised that there hasn't been a huge upswing over the last 20 years in methamphetamine use by two groups: tween-and-teen children, and mothers between 35 and 45 years old.

  9. #9

    Default

    ... or maybe those choice demographics are much more discreet to those who study them?
    aaAAAAaaah

Similar Threads

  1. I've realised the solution to all of society's ills
    By Chillhouse in forum Mature Topics
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 25-Dec-2008, 20:39
  2. Girls or boys goodnites?
    By tom in forum Diaper Talk
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: 26-Jun-2008, 13:32
  3. I Like Boys...
    By FullMetal in forum Off-topic
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: 25-Jan-2008, 18:10

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
ADISC.org - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community.
ADISC.org is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.