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Thread: Windows 10 is a joke.

  1. #21

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    This is precisely what drives me up the wall with Windows. It does whatever it "wants" to, and with no regard for what it has been commanded to do. Even killing errant tasks is something it generally won't do the first time it's asked; you have to nag it. And automatic updates? Don't even get me started. It's especially fun when you have a laptop in an airport and you need to shut it down to board your plane... nope, sorry, can't be shut down right now, gotta update things! If you shut the system down forcefully you might lose your data! Sit and wait, and make the plane wait for you too. It does the exact opposite of what it was commanded to do. It's just very... disrespectful toward the user all the way around. Every time I use it (mostly at work these days) I want to put my fist through the screen. I hate babysitting computers. >.<

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sapphyre View Post
    This is precisely what drives me up the wall with Windows. It does whatever it "wants" to, and with no regard for what it has been commanded to do. Even killing errant tasks is something it generally won't do the first time it's asked; you have to nag it. And automatic updates? Don't even get me started. It's especially fun when you have a laptop in an airport and you need to shut it down to board your plane... nope, sorry, can't be shut down right now, gotta update things! If you shut the system down forcefully you might lose your data! Sit and wait, and make the plane wait for you too. It does the exact opposite of what it was commanded to do. It's just very... disrespectful toward the user all the way around. Every time I use it (mostly at work these days) I want to put my fist through the screen. I hate babysitting computers. >.<
    I know what you mean! Windows is so inflexible and irritating sometimes. I had a play with Windows 10 for a few days, but the user-interface is so ugly, bloated and tedious to use that I went straight back to 7. I don't know why Microsoft don't allow you to choose the GUI, like you can in GNU/Linux. I'd stick with an XP-interface if I could. At least GNU has XFCE, which is clean, lightweight and intuitive.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by w0lfpack91 View Post
    With Windows 10 home go into the control panel, settings, updates, turn updates off (manual) it will give you several warning saying this is not recommended are you sure you wish to continue just keep clicking yes. I no internet connection can vary based on your geographical location but I've got the lowest tier internet available in my area and I still don't have issues with updates bogging down the web
    I don't use 10 (yet), but in past versions I've found that updates sometimes override your settings, ie, set to manual update, but then when you do a manual update, resets to automatic.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maxx View Post
    I don't use 10 (yet), but in past versions I've found that updates sometimes override your settings, ie, set to manual update, but then when you do a manual update, resets to automatic.
    Always double triple and quadruple check

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    I know what you mean! Windows is so inflexible and irritating sometimes. I had a play with Windows 10 for a few days, but the user-interface is so ugly, bloated and tedious to use that I went straight back to 7. I don't know why Microsoft don't allow you to choose the GUI, like you can in GNU/Linux. I'd stick with an XP-interface if I could. At least GNU has XFCE, which is clean, lightweight and intuitive.
    Actually, my favorite window manager for Linux / BSD is "cwm." Especially, it works well on laptops. It takes a little getting used to -- almost everything is keyboard-driven. There are no taskbars, no menubars, no title bars on windows, etc. It really maximizes screen space. And on laptops, that's important.... as is not having to use the trackpad all the time. ^^ But things like toggling between virtual desktops, moving and resizing windows, bringing windows to the forefront on top of other windows, launching new programs and closing windows... is basically all done by keyboard. Once you get over the learning curve it's quite nice. It's become a favorite. Although FluxBox is a close 2nd.

    The main thing though, is that under Linux / BSD, my computer just does what I tell it to -- the first time -- no more and no less. When I tell it to shutdown, it just shuts down... no "Oh wait I need to spend an hour updating now, don't turn me off!" When I tell it to kill a program that has locked up, I only need to ask once. On Windows, in my experience it's usually 3 times. You say "End Task" and it's all "OK...*does nothing*" So you have to ask again and again before it finally decides that you REALLY want to end the task and does it. And then there are DRM issues... I had to replace my mainboard a few years back because the original one failed on me; if I'd been running Windows, I'm fairly sure that would have involved a call to Microsoft to unlock Windows for me since it's now "on a different computer". I'm certainly not shelling out hundreds of dollars for the privilege of dealing with this. I should maybe mention as a side-note that I didn't buy my computer, I built it from parts. So it didn't "come with" Windows, I'd have to buy that separately if I wanted it. As it is, my desktop is dual-booted with Gentoo Linux and OpenBSD. I don't expect I'll be buying a copy of Windows anytime soon.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sapphyre View Post
    This is precisely what drives me up the wall with Windows. It does whatever it "wants" to, and with no regard for what it has been commanded to do. Even killing errant tasks is something it generally won't do the first time it's asked; you have to nag it. And automatic updates? Don't even get me started. It's especially fun when you have a laptop in an airport and you need to shut it down to board your plane... nope, sorry, can't be shut down right now, gotta update things! If you shut the system down forcefully you might lose your data! Sit and wait, and make the plane wait for you too. It does the exact opposite of what it was commanded to do. It's just very... disrespectful toward the user all the way around. Every time I use it (mostly at work these days) I want to put my fist through the screen. I hate babysitting computers. >.<
    I've never really had an issue with it "doing whatever it wants". As for the airport thing why not set your power button to engage hibernate mode?

    Little understanding on how the Windows operating system works you can circumvent 99.9% of problems that users commonly have about the operating system " doing whatever it wants".

    But whenever it comes to anything computer-related you always need to take an active stance on your settings and understanding what your computer is doing and why it changes things. if not you're opening the door and inviting trouble in.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by w0lfpack91 View Post
    I've never really had an issue with it "doing whatever it wants". As for the airport thing why not set your power button to engage hibernate mode?

    Little understanding on how the Windows operating system works you can circumvent 99.9% of problems that users commonly have about the operating system " doing whatever it wants".

    But whenever it comes to anything computer-related you always need to take an active stance on your settings and understanding what your computer is doing and why it changes things. if not you're opening the door and inviting trouble in.
    For a start, the point is that my computer should just do what I tell it to do, not the opposite. Secondly, on my laptop from work which runs Windows 7, I do not have admin privileges, Finally, yes, it's important to understand the details of one's OS, but with Windows it just does a lot behind your back by default until you find ways to disable that. And to me, that is very disrespectful to the user. By way of contrast, OpenBSD had to be manually configured to hibernate when I closed the lid on my laptop -- by default, closing the lid did nothing at all. In general, OpenBSD / Linux doesn't do ANYTHING that I have not expressly told it to do. Unlike a bratty 5-year-old, I don't have to constantly watch it to see what it's up to behind my back, nor tell it to do anything more than once. The user experience is quite different, and makes me feel far less inclined to defenestrate my computer.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sapphyre View Post
    Actually, my favorite window manager for Linux / BSD is "cwm." Especially, it works well on laptops. It takes a little getting used to -- almost everything is keyboard-driven. There are no taskbars, no menubars, no title bars on windows, etc. It really maximizes screen space. And on laptops, that's important.... as is not having to use the trackpad all the time. ^^ But things like toggling between virtual desktops, moving and resizing windows, bringing windows to the forefront on top of other windows, launching new programs and closing windows... is basically all done by keyboard. Once you get over the learning curve it's quite nice. It's become a favorite. Although FluxBox is a close 2nd.
    Yeah -- I remember the simple days of Unix before fully-fledged "desktop environments" even existed. But I find XFCE great because it's as lightweight as a window manager, but has a nice, simple intuitive interface that requires no learning of keyboard shortcuts, etc.

    The great thing about GNU/Linux is that you are in control, and there's so much choice. And these choices are here by design, rather than requiring hacks to wrestle the OS into some kind of usable format.



    Quote Originally Posted by Sapphyre View Post
    The main thing though, is that under Linux / BSD, my computer just does what I tell it to -- the first time -- no more and no less. When I tell it to shutdown, it just shuts down... no "Oh wait I need to spend an hour updating now, don't turn me off!" When I tell it to kill a program that has locked up, I only need to ask once. On Windows, in my experience it's usually 3 times. You say "End Task" and it's all "OK...*does nothing*" So you have to ask again and again before it finally decides that you REALLY want to end the task and does it.
    It took me a long time to find a GNU/Linux distro that I could actually wrap my head round. But Arch Linux does everything I need. It's amazing! :-D People think it's complicated, but it really depends how your brain works, I think. I find Ubuntu complicated/bloated, but Arch is just a breath of fresh air!



    Quote Originally Posted by Sapphyre View Post
    And then there are DRM issues... I had to replace my mainboard a few years back because the original one failed on me; if I'd been running Windows, I'm fairly sure that would have involved a call to Microsoft to unlock Windows for me since it's now "on a different computer". I'm certainly not shelling out hundreds of dollars for the privilege of dealing with this. I should maybe mention as a side-note that I didn't buy my computer, I built it from parts. So it didn't "come with" Windows, I'd have to buy that separately if I wanted it. As it is, my desktop is dual-booted with Gentoo Linux and OpenBSD. I don't expect I'll be buying a copy of Windows anytime soon.
    Yep -- when I heard about the new Windows XP "activation" and the fact that installation CDs would no longer be supplied with new computers, I just decided to buy retail versions of the OS. I can't see myself using Windows 10 any time soon, though, retail or not.

    What annoys me so much about Windows 10 is the unnecessary eye-candy, the embedded advertising, the privacy issues, the lack of control/flexibility and the fact that it's just so unnecessarily bloated.



    Quote Originally Posted by w0lfpack91 View Post
    I've never really had an issue with it "doing whatever it wants". As for the airport thing why not set your power button to engage hibernate mode?

    Little understanding on how the Windows operating system works you can circumvent 99.9% of problems that users commonly have about the operating system " doing whatever it wants".

    But whenever it comes to anything computer-related you always need to take an active stance on your settings and understanding what your computer is doing and why it changes things. if not you're opening the door and inviting trouble in.
    If you've never used an operating system like Unix/GNU where you have complete control, you probably aren't even aware of all the things that Windows does for you without your explicit permission.

    If you're technically-minded and want to be in control of your device, it's really infuriating when the OS assumes it knows best, or refuses to work in the way that you want!

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiny View Post
    Yeah -- I remember the simple days of Unix before fully-fledged "desktop environments" even existed. But I find XFCE great because it's as lightweight as a window manager, but has a nice, simple intuitive interface that requires no learning of keyboard shortcuts, etc.

    The great thing about GNU/Linux is that you are in control, and there's so much choice. And these choices are here by design, rather than requiring hacks to wrestle the OS into some kind of usable format.



    It took me a long time to find a GNU/Linux distro that I could actually wrap my head round. But Arch Linux does everything I need. It's amazing! :-D People think it's complicated, but it really depends how your brain works, I think. I find Ubuntu complicated/bloated, but Arch is just a breath of fresh air!



    Yep -- when I heard about the new Windows XP "activation" and the fact that installation CDs would no longer be supplied with new computers, I just decided to buy retail versions of the OS. I can't see myself using Windows 10 any time soon, though, retail or not.

    What annoys me so much about Windows 10 is the unnecessary eye-candy, the embedded advertising, the privacy issues, the lack of control/flexibility and the fact that it's just so unnecessarily bloated.



    If you've never used an operating system like Unix/GNU where you have complete control, you probably aren't even aware of all the things that Windows does for you without your explicit permission.

    If you're technically-minded and want to be in control of your device, it's really infuriating when the OS assumes it knows best, or refuses to work in the way that you want!
    If your a Unix/Linux user you understand that a lot of systems can be set to perform specific tasks when parameters are met. Microsoft controls the market and is needed for most software. While a lot can be run in Wine it's normally buggy as hell, also there is the option of running a virtual machine with windows. If they are tech savvy enough to have a problem with the lack of control then they are also savvy enough to know several alternitives, there's dual boot setups and virtual machines, there is also running wine if you are willing to risk the instability. The point is there are several options and they don't cost anything except the time to set them up.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sapphyre View Post
    For a start, the point is that my computer should just do what I tell it to do, not the opposite. Secondly, on my laptop from work which runs Windows 7, I do not have admin privileges, Finally, yes, it's important to understand the details of one's OS, but with Windows it just does a lot behind your back by default until you find ways to disable that. And to me, that is very disrespectful to the user. By way of contrast, OpenBSD had to be manually configured to hibernate when I closed the lid on my laptop -- by default, closing the lid did nothing at all. In general, OpenBSD / Linux doesn't do ANYTHING that I have not expressly told it to do. Unlike a bratty 5-year-old, I don't have to constantly watch it to see what it's up to behind my back, nor tell it to do anything more than once. The user experience is quite different, and makes me feel far less inclined to defenestrate my computer.
    Disrespectful to the user or not Microsoft is not open source and therefore are allowed to do as they please with their software. Also probably 80% of windows users don't understand how a computer works they just expect it to work. Microsoft Windows operates based on the needs and skill level of its target audience. It's simplicity is what put it as far ahead.

    As far as work computers, that's an issue you need to take up with your company IT dept. Again most people are clueless about computers so employers set it to take care of itself without you.

    Bringing your concerns to your company will have far better results than complaining online.

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