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Thread: Best to reduce my thighs?

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by BoundCoder View Post
    Got a source on that one?
    Well, yeah. Me, and pretty much any athlete you care to ask. The CDC is about halfway between me and the 3x20. https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity...ults/index.htm, but let's be honest here, the CDC recommendation is more of a "please, please America, get off the couch and do SOMETHING, ANYTHING!" Even half an hour a day is kidding yourself. These days, it takes me 20 minutes warmup to get my heartrate up to the point where I can make a hard effort.

    For weight loss purposes, 3x20 is even more absurd. You can't burn enough calories to matter in 20 minutes, especially if you're out of shape and don't have the oxygen transfer capacity to go at a high level. Remember, it takes oxygen to burn fuel.

    Edit: If you're just starting a fitness-weight loss program, any weight loss the first couple of months has to come mostly from calorie restriction, until you develop the cardiovascular capacity to go harder and longer with your workouts.

    Once you're in good shape, weight loss gets easier because you can transfer more oxygen, and burn more calories (fuel) in less time. Also, when you're exercising, your muscles are burning a mix of carbs (glycogen) and fat (free fatty acids). Over time (and lots of miles and hours), the bodies of endurance athletes adapt to using a larger proportion of free fatty acids, so you actually become more efficient at using fat as fuel.



    - Get a regiment going. Have a specific schedule with specific goals, record your progress, etc. It's advice everyone hears and most ignore, but (at least for me) when I started tracking my progress over time and doing the same things consistently rather than just kinda winging it, I started seeing real progress. Don't just go for a run, try to run faster than last week, or for longer at the same pace. Always be trying to improve.
    Agree that getting going is the important thing. Doing something you like and will keep doing is more important to long term success than doing the 'best' exercise. Variety can be important as well. Tired of running? Hit the pool today. A 7 mile walk with the dog is still 7 miles, even though you're not rockin' the spandex and there's no stopwatch... and the dog will worship you. After it's nap.

    For some of us, a log is counterproductive. I stopped keeping one early on in my endurance career because I found myself obsessing over times and distances, getting depressed if today wasn't as fast as yesterday, or if I was light on miles this week for some reason. I haven't worn a watch on runs in 30 years, except for races, or days when I have to be on time for something else. Doing "enough" has never been a problem, the workouts are their own reward.



    Look into interval training. Most research seems to indicate that it's effective and generally better for you than steady state cardio (thinking being that if you just run at a steady pace for an hour every day, your body just gets very efficient at running).
    Athletes of every stripe have been doing intervals for thousands of years. They have benefits, and limitations, same as steady-state running, swimming or cycling. You can't do intervals every day. If you're doing it right, you need recovery days in between where you do something else or you'll just end up injured. Typically your pop-fitness versions of intervals are watered down so as not to frighten off couch potatoes. They also typically gloss over warmup and cooldown.

    Here's what I would consider an interval session: Jog 2 miles to the high school track (warmup), 12x400 at 90% effort, 90 seconds active rest between 400's, jog 2 miles home as cool down. Surest way to wake up sore and immobile is fail to keep the blood flowing after a hard effort.

    If stationary bike or treadmill is your favored poison, try doing it while watching your favorite NFL team. Sprint the commercial breaks. Guarantee that will get your attention....and burn significant calories. If you're a Bears fan like me, the endorphins counteract the depression, and at least the afternoon wasn't entirely wasted.



    - Jump rope. Looks easy, but maintaining a decent pace with a jump rope for an extended period of time is actually an intense workout and burns a lot of calories. It also does a lot for your coordination and stability.

    - Try to get into a sport. Find a local "for fun" group in your area. Much easier to motivate yourself to go play floor hockey then go jog for an hour.

    - Everything in moderation, and don't over think things. If your goal isn't to be a professional athlete, I feel you don't really have to concern yourself with all the minutia. If you spend any length of time researching nutrition, you quickly find there is a mountain of (mostly conflicting) data and ideas, but the age old wisdom of "eat healthier, get more exercise" really does work, and really is that simple. Just try to eat a variety of generally healthy food and get some exercise and you'll probably be fine.
    Yup.

    While you can't log running in circles and jumping to conclusions as exercise, incorporating more activity into your daily life can be effective and time efficient. Look for excuses to walk or bike places rather than drive. It may take a little longer, but when you consider that you're killing two birds with one stone, you're actually saving time.

    For more information than you probably wanted: http://www.gssiweb.org/sports-scienc...orts-nutrition

    This is real stuff, not marketing or pop-fitness. I did time as a gerbil in their lab, so at least some of the data comes from tubes, hoses and electrodes connected to ol' Maxx.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Quote Originally Posted by Tokiyomi View Post
    I know and I like them (sometimes) but I want to reduce them because sometimes when I want to wear my goodnites the sides break and I hate that so much
    LOL. At least you have your priorities straight!
    Last edited by Maxx; 6 Days Ago at 16:47.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maxx View Post
    LOL. At least you have your priorities straight!
    Ye, I know, I'm a little weird with my priorities



    Quote Originally Posted by swimbutterfly22 View Post
    O I see, but maybe trying to get bigger nappies is an easier solution than shrinking your thighs. As long as you can't get bigger ones maybe it's best to use stickytape on the sides?
    Well the problem is that in my country the majority of the diapers size are medium to extra large, and the medium are to big for me, and the few ones that are sold in a small size, are from two tapes and I can't close the second tape because of my thighs, and no diapers are sold with only one big tape like the in the diapers for babies

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maxx View Post
    Well, yeah. Me, and pretty much any athlete you care to ask.
    I think we've got different definitions of "general fitness". I generally think of general fitness as being of healthy weight, healthy body fat percentage, and being able to run up a flight of stairs without getting out of breath. You're definition seems a lot closer to that of being an athlete.



    The CDC is about halfway between me and the 3x20.
    They specify "2 hours and 30 minutes (150 minutes) of moderate-intensity aerobic activity" but then they define that as "brisk walking". Later on down the page they say "1 hour and 15 minutes (75 minutes) of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity" (which works out to around 3x30) where they define vigorous-intensity aerobic activity as "jogging or running". Their definitions seem wonky to me (I wouldn't define brisk walking as "moderate intensity"), but their bottom line more or less aligns with the long quoted 3x30 of decently intense exercise to maintain general good health.



    Edit: If you're just starting a fitness-weight loss program, any weight loss the first couple of months has to come mostly from calorie restriction, until you develop the cardiovascular capacity to go harder and longer with your workouts.
    I think most weight loss advice centers on calorie reduction for this reason. Realistically by the time you work up to being physically capable of burning a significant portion of calories through exercise alone, you're probably approaching a healthy weight anyway, and it's a lot easier to eat 500 calories less food then burn off 500 calories running. It's still worth doing the 3x30 (or whatever you can) because it comes with a lot of health benefits, but I think weight loss is best done in the kitchen not the gym. Once you lose the weight, keeping up on the exercise is a good way to keep it off for the reasons you said.



    Athletes of every stripe have been doing intervals for thousands of years. They have benefits, and limitations, same as steady-state running, swimming or cycling. You can't do intervals every day. If you're doing it right, you need recovery days in between where you do something else or you'll just end up injured.
    This comes back to our definition of "general fitness". If you're aiming to approach athlete level fitness, then yeah it's probably just one of many tools in your training arsenal. If you're only doing 3x30 though, I think HIIV (even the watered down version us more sedentary types follow) is a good way to maximize those 30 minutes.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by BoundCoder View Post
    I think most weight loss advice centers on calorie reduction for this reason. Realistically by the time you work up to being physically capable of burning a significant portion of calories through exercise alone, you're probably approaching a healthy weight anyway, and it's a lot easier to eat 500 calories less food then burn off 500 calories running. It's still worth doing the 3x30 (or whatever you can) because it comes with a lot of health benefits, but I think weight loss is best done in the kitchen not the gym. Once you lose the weight, keeping up on the exercise is a good way to keep it off for the reasons you said.
    Don't disagree, except that I'd cross out "a lot of" in front health benefits. Any activity is better than none, but more is better, and I'm pretty sure that's the CDC's point.

    As for kitchen vs track, I think a lot of that is cloth vs. disposable. Different things work for different people. As with many things here, I try to be the counterpoint to conventional wisdom. If I seem overzealous about the exercise side of it, that's because too many people don't realize there's a world beyond struggling through a three mile jog in the morning. Even at my peak, the first 2-3 miles always sucked. Things hurt, my stomach didn't feel right, uncomfortable feeling in my chest, stride uncoordinated. After that, warmed up, its like getting above the clouds on an airline flight. No more bumpy, rocky, scary stuff. Everything smooths out. These days, on my bike, I don't even bother shifting to the big ring until 6 or 7 miles when all my systems are up to operating specs.

    I really struggled with weight through my 20's and early 30's. I like eating, most of my family is obese, and I have zero resistance to junk food. I tried going back to running, and found it mostly an unpleasant chore. I did a fair amount of cycling and swimming as well, but weekly totals probably averaged no more than 5x45. Worse, Mrs. Maxx is pretty much clueless about nutrition, despite her protests to the contrary.

    I stumbled into a couple of elite athletes who took me under their wing and showed me the way. 2 years and 50 pounds later, I was challenging them. Food became a question of "Do I have enough fuel to get through this session". In some cases, "do I have enough to make the next town". True, my diet changed a bit because some foods have unpleasant side effects next morning when you try to do 100's on 90 seconds in the pool at 5am. There isn't much late night snacking when you fall asleep at 9pm.

    Now, 20 lbs of winter insulation isn't a big deal when I can start ripping off 200-300 miles a week on the bike in March.




    This comes back to our definition of "general fitness". If you're aiming to approach athlete level fitness, then yeah it's probably just one of many tools in your training arsenal. If you're only doing 3x30 though, I think HIIV (even the watered down version us more sedentary types follow) is a good way to maximize those 30 minutes.
    Absolutely correct.

    Still, a couple things to consider: 1. Are you doing warmup and cooldown? Are you counting that in the 30 minutes? If the answer is no to either or both, you're kidding yourself about the effectiveness. What you're doing can't be consider "high intensity". By anyone's definition, high intensity would mean at least 80% of max heartrate. Unless you're different than everyone else on the planet, it takes at least 5 or 10 minutes of warm-up to do that. When you're getting up in years like me, it's longer still. If you were to jump into an interval cold with a heartrate monitor, you'd find that you're just going anaerobic because your heart and circulation aren't keeping up. That's a source of discomfort.

    1a. Stretching: Not really useful or effective. Your warmup takes care of getting heartrate and blood flow where they need to be. For me, best preliminary to get loose and ready for any sort of hard effort, whether race, or lifting, or whatever is a half mile easy in the pool.

    2. My personal rule of thumb.... If getting dressed, undressed, showering, and doing laundry take longer than the workout, then the workout probably isn't worth doing.

  5. #15

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    Man, just thinking about all that exercise is wearing me out. I think I'll opt for the liposuction so I can stay on my couch the rest of the time.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tokiyomi View Post
    Ye, I know, I'm a little weird with my priorities



    Well the problem is that in my country the majority of the diapers size are medium to extra large, and the medium are to big for me, and the few ones that are sold in a small size, are from two tapes and I can't close the second tape because of my thighs, and no diapers are sold with only one big tape like the in the diapers for babies
    Well Tokiyomi it looks like you've got yourself a diaper dilemma right now . Ordering the right size online would be an option but that might be hard when you're living with your parents.
    I think excersize is good for your health but I'm not sure if you'll get significantly smaller thighs from that. Maybe it runs in your family to have thick thighs. What about your mother or other family members? If they also have them you'll probably always have thick thighs. Though it might be impractical, it's beautiful!

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