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Thread: Do you consider yourself successful?

  1. #11

    Default

    When I first wrote this thread, I considered the term success and what it meant. There are many degrees of success. For me, I'm happy with my chosen profession (which is extremely competitive), make a decent income and have received accolades from colleagues on my work. The point is that success is not a means to an end. It is something that happens when you gain a talent and put a lot of hard work into it. It helps if you enjoy what you are doing. It helps you focus.

  2. #12

    Default

    I've been successful at getting this far in life (almost 32 years) which is an opportunity not forwarded to everyone so I'd say I'm successful. My job and my skill sets I try not to let define who I am. I just live day-by-day and make each day as successful as possible no matter how big or how small.

    When I'm able to get up every morning I consider that a success.

  3. #13

    Default

    Locally, I am fairly well respected in my field.

    I have let my AB/DL consume me a little too much and it's hindering me pursuing a specialty in my field that I remain interested in. I'm trying to fix the damage but for the moment, I'm at an impasse there.

  4. #14

    Default

    My success, which isn't materially amazing, is, in part down to wearing diapers and doing something about my need to be incontinent. I was very mixed up, very negative and slack at anything that required an effort. Then I started using diapers and the effect was a positive one. I felt way more positive and confident. I started to do, and be committed to things which required effort and application and determination. I'm not saying I went from slacker to alpha male, but it did help me change to achieve a lifestyle and personal happiness that seemed out of reach.

  5. #15

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    Financially successful? I suppose. I have more money than I need for buying anything I would want for myself. Successful in life? Hardly. I still haven't figured out what the meaning of life is for me, and time is growing short.

  6. #16

    Default

    I would say successful. A mentor of mine taught me “if you aren’t adding bullet points to your resume what are you doing?”. So, when a job starts to get repetitive I am out. I am not a consultant but I move jobs roughly every 4 years. I usually hear from 2 head hunters a month so that makes me feel like I am doing something right. I have the house, loving wife, kids, no debt except for the mortgage and I can be who I am and make it all work. Being a AB or DL doesn't/shouldn't have to impact being successful.

    I was open about it at two jobs with my peers. It didn't really change anything. I think we all have this fear that being what we are somehow taints us or peoples image of us. It's not true. I think (know from my experiences) people are going to judge you WAY more on who you are as a person than what you wear under your cloths or do at home.

    I would say successful doesn’t always translate into happy though.

  7. #17

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by JustaGamer View Post
    I would say successful. A mentor of mine taught me “if you aren’t adding bullet points to your resume what are you doing?”. So, when a job starts to get repetitive I am out. I am not a consultant but I move jobs roughly every 4 years. I usually hear from 2 head hunters a month so that makes me feel like I am doing something right. I have the house, loving wife, kids, no debt except for the mortgage and I can be who I am and make it all work. Being a AB or DL doesn't/shouldn't have to impact being successful.

    I was open about it at two jobs with my peers. It didn't really change anything. I think we all have this fear that being what we are somehow taints us or peoples image of us. It's not true. I think (know from my experiences) people are going to judge you WAY more on who you are as a person than what you wear under your cloths or do at home.

    I would say successful doesn’t always translate into happy though.
    So what kind of jobs did you have?

  8. #18

    Default

    Well we all start at the bottom right? High school and early college was auto work in shop, then I went on to do data entry and worked in a call center. Those were jobs... then I started what I call my career path. My education was in IT but I really came out of school hating on IT people (no offense anyone). Just so many of my class mates had this superiority complex and I liked to work with people... or so I thought. Started in Sales, hated that, became an Account Executive. Loved that but the hours... OMG...

    Then I realized I like working with people but not all the time. I found myself liking project management and leading people to complete projects so I took some classes and became a PM for awhile. Found I really love educating but not documenting. Leveraging my career honed skills and now my education I found a job managing databases in a marketing department. I get to play computer geek but also create all kinds of fun and crazy reports to share out educating others. My current employer also leverages my PM skills as well to lead other projects.

    My advice, do the extra work. Hear the company is putting a team together to scope out a new X,Y or Z, or change a process, review the corporate goals or mission statement... volunteer! Some department (not yours) is always getting hammered and needing help. Help, but also use your outside view to look at their processes at the 1,000 or 10,000 foot view and recommend improvements.

    To many people are sour pusses who think "that's not in my job description" or "I don't get paid to do that"... Well I make more money then all of them and everyone else with a helpful and happy attitude can to. Also... Don't pay attention to the fear mongers who say the economy is bad, there are no jobs. There are always jobs. Sometimes you have to take a step back to take three or four more forward. Don't stick around a place that doesn't or can't promote. You may have the best gig and boss ever but if you want to move up sometimes you just have to make a change. Final thing I learned... Good or bad companies are loyal to themselves. Your best interests are in your hands. No matter how good a boss/the company may make you feel, don't get strung along chasing a promotion that really wont ever come.

  9. #19

    Default

    Success is subjective. Some people considering adhering to their life's career goal as success. Some people consider owning a house by age 30 a success. Some people consider making every day unforgettable as a success.

    Well, I wouldn't consider myself successful because I failed at my life's intent: which was to fly jets in the US Navy. Oddly enough, I've picked up ragtag collections of friends who all wanted to be fighter pilots such as myself, and they all come from different walks of life. Kind of convinced I am a fighter pilot, but this is one of the odd universes in a series of parallel universes where it didn't work out.

    When I joined the military, my father cheered "He's the only one that made it!" Yet everything kind of fell short. Oh well. Being bitter about what could have been isn't what mature people do.

    Aside from that, most of my family is kind of low-brow and plagued with addictions and disabilities. Most work odd jobs and some collect disability. I'm kind of seen as an outlier in the sense that I even have career aspirations. My parents do well, they struggle, but they're nowhere near as bad as the rest of the family is.

    I worked roadside assistance for a year, which, cumulatively is about two years if you consider an 80 hour workweek in a truck adding up. I still want to involve myself with a career path of danger and risk... and grit. And you don't have to fly jets to do that. I'll settle for working on electricity poles as a lineman and working on substations. Maybe branch into engineering if the tuition water's right.

    Outside of careers, I tend to leverage how well I do with how competitive I am in martial arts. Muay Thai was my niche and I moved up to regional champ tier before I could no longer afford to compete.

    So I don't say no to ballsy or risky jobs so I guess that's a success point. Never fell for drugs and I have all of my teeth. Entered competitive fighting in muay thai and never struck a loss. Moved out at 17. Physically fit and not calling a Hazmat team to clear out my apartment (you're doin something right if you haven't appeared on the show "Hoarders" in your life). Plenty of materials for everyone else to brag about but personally I see myself as mediocre.

  10. #20
    MarchinBunny

    Default

    Absolutely not. I don't think there is any single thing a person could point to in my life that they could consider "successful."

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