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Thread: Frustrated about Government, Louisiana Flood.

  1. #1

    Default Frustrated about Government, Louisiana Flood.

    You may or may not agree with everything I say, but hear me out.

    Before this major disaster occured, I've already had no faith in the government. Now I'm really starting to question the authenticity of all government programs.

    I'm sure many people know what happened here in Louisiana two weeks ago. A massive flood had affected a very large area of Louisiana including my area of Lafayette La. I personally had 30 inches (76cm) of water in my yard. While my mobile home rental is off the ground. I couldn't do anything about my vehicles. I lost two vehicles in the flood to water damage.

    There wasn't even a warning for our area and it literally dumped 13 inches (30cm) of rain in 4 hours. Rain started at 3am. If I didn't move my newest vehicle when I did, I would've lost everything that I pretty much owned in value. The rain continued for 3 days and ended up getting 23-25in of rain. The aftermath for tens of thousands of people in Louisiana is grim and people lost everything they had.

    FEMA has been what it has been since hurricane Katrina, a disaster. So many of these people are being denied government assistance even though the program is a citizen funded program to provide assistance for major disasters such as this.

    Also, Obama thought nothing of what was taking place and did nothing to address the situation while he was on a tax payer paid vacation. This man has pretty much spit on everyone. This isn't the first time this has happened as George Bush also pretty much waited a long period of time before taking action. I'm not affiliated with either party to set that straight as well.

    Two houses down from where I live was almost halfway submerged in water. I was stuck in my house for 4 days. Talk about cabin fever. I missed work and I'm behind on lots of things now. I have been denied any assistance. I almost feel betrayed. While my losses are fractions of what some people's are, I'm getting frustrated. Everyone here is frustrated. It's only thanks to the numerous volunteers that swarmed to help people on their own dime and time. We literally needed boats to get around because roads were raging rivers.

    The area has had help from many people, which restored a lot of faith in humanity that was teetering on empty. The one thing that angers me so much is the lack of help from the government. Telling people that their mold infested home is still a safe dwelling, that their financial welfare is fine when they have no way to get to work. This, along with Katrina and Rita, it seems like the people are left to fend for themselves. I feel so hopeless.

    Will this finally open the eyes to people that the government has the people's interest and well being in the toilet?

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by MeTaLMaNN1983 View Post
    You may or may not agree with everything I say, but hear me out.

    Before this major disaster occured, I've already had no faith in the government. Now I'm really starting to question the authenticity of all government programs.
    I can understand your frustration as there are a lot of things that are not as right as they should be with our government. However, being familiar with a lot of other countries, I have to share that here in the U.S., we have a much better government system than in many other areas and we are quite fortunate to have the things that we do have. It is by no means perfect and we struggle in so many areas, but there is much to be thankful for.



    Quote Originally Posted by MeTaLMaNN1983 View Post
    I'm sure many people know what happened here in Louisiana two weeks ago. A massive flood had affected a very large area of Louisiana including my area of Lafayette La. I personally had 30 inches (76cm) of water in my yard. While my mobile home rental is off the ground. I couldn't do anything about my vehicles. I lost two vehicles in the flood to water damage.

    There wasn't even a warning for our area and it literally dumped 13 inches (30cm) of rain in 4 hours. Rain started at 3am. If I didn't move my newest vehicle when I did, I would've lost everything that I pretty much owned in value. The rain continued for 3 days and ended up getting 23-25in of rain. The aftermath for tens of thousands of people in Louisiana is grim and people lost everything they had.
    Gives you big hugs (if that is okay)

    Growing up, we had major floods in our area and I know the impact of having such a disaster first hand by having 5 feet of water in our home and our barns and other buildings being waist deep in water and all of our fields underwater for an extended period of time.

    It was the start of several natural events that ultimately led to having to sell much of the family farm and change in a lifestyle that had been part of my family for generations.



    Quote Originally Posted by MeTaLMaNN1983 View Post
    FEMA has been what it has been since hurricane Katrina, a disaster. So many of these people are being denied government assistance even though the program is a citizen funded program to provide assistance for major disasters such as this.

    Also, Obama thought nothing of what was taking place and did nothing to address the situation while he was on a tax payer paid vacation. This man has pretty much spit on everyone. This isn't the first time this has happened as George Bush also pretty much waited a long period of time before taking action. I'm not affiliated with either party to set that straight as well.

    Two houses down from where I live was almost halfway submerged in water. I was stuck in my house for 4 days. Talk about cabin fever. I missed work and I'm behind on lots of things now. I have been denied any assistance. I almost feel betrayed. While my losses are fractions of what some people's are, I'm getting frustrated. Everyone here is frustrated. It's only thanks to the numerous volunteers that swarmed to help people on their own dime and time. We literally needed boats to get around because roads were raging rivers.

    The area has had help from many people, which restored a lot of faith in humanity that was teetering on empty. The one thing that angers me so much is the lack of help from the government. Telling people that their mold infested home is still a safe dwelling, that their financial welfare is fine when they have no way to get to work. This, along with Katrina and Rita, it seems like the people are left to fend for themselves. I feel so hopeless.

    Will this finally open the eyes to people that the government has the people's interest and well being in the toilet?
    Again, I truly feel your pain, as I have been through this myself. But I have to share my own thoughts here by asking the question, at what point is the "government" responsible for trying to correct events and disasters that are natural occurrences?

    While the government has access to lots of modern technology and many amazing programs that are meant to help citizens in these times of distress, they pale in comparison to the power of nature. I am a wildland firefighter as part of my position and there are many wildfires that no matter what technology or amount of money we throw at it, we are powerless in some situations to stop or control it. In most cases, we have amazing abilities to assist and protect lives and property, but in other cases, the best we can do is to save peoples lives by getting them out of harms way, and sometimes there is simply not enough time to properly warn them and it is each person's responsibility to look out for themselves.

    As individuals we cannot solely rely upon the government or other entities to protect and provide for us, as there simply isn't enough resources to do so in many situations. Is the system broken? Well, yes, there are a lot of problems and much room for improvement. But ultimately, the safety, well-being, and recovery from natural disaster events has to reside within ourselves.

    Any human-made organization, whether government or private, cannot harness and control the forces of nature, and when events such as these happen, we each have to be forces of our own destiny and not rely solely on others to fix it.

    I hope that doesn't sound too harsh. But I have been through everything you have shared here as well as many other circumstances. Both as a "victim" of a natural disaster, as well as many times participating as someone who has spent several weeks working 16 hour days, 7 days a week, living in a tent and away from all other aspects of life trying to help those being affected from disasters such as these.

    I know this doesn't help you feel better as you are obviously impacted and suffering from the situation, but I hope that it may help you understand better why you may not have been able to receive all the help you need to recover at this point. May you find some comfort in the fact your own life or others that you are close to have not been taken by this event. I know first hand of the pain from losing "brothers" who while trying to save others property from harm were overtaken by fire and lost their lives in this effort. I just came from such an event where one of the individuals assisting to try to protect further homes from destruction gave his life in this effort. He left a wife and two young children who no longer have their father, all in the efforts to assist those suffering from a disaster such as you have experienced.

    I pray that you may find the help you need and that you may be able to be back to a sense of normalcy soon in your situation. But I also hope that you may see beyond the seemingly problems of not having received all of the aid from the government that you and others need to recover and truly feel the efforts of those that are giving their all to try to help you in your situation.

    While the system is broken in some cases, there is a lot that works amazingly well and is recognized as the best incident management system in the world. So many other countries look to the Incident Command System, developed here in the U.S., as a basis for their own emergency services programs. FEMA? Well, I agree it certainly has its problems and more so it seems than many of the other incident management agencies. But even so, you need to realize that during any incident, the fact that a whole infrastructure to provide command and direction to assist in the incident can be mobilized and set up within 24 to 48 hours with resources available from across the country to assist, that is an amazing thing!

    Despite the government's problems, there are many aspects of the U.S. government's emergency management that is second to none elsewhere on the planet. I would hope the focus may be on the efforts that so many are making on your behalf and the sacrifices that are being made by them to assist in recovery from something that was caused by nature and out of anyone or any government organization's control.


    TeddyBearCowboy
    Last edited by TeddyBearCowboy; 31-Aug-2016 at 06:26.

  3. #3

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    Very unfortunate. I'm sure I can't imagine how lame this must be, but my thoughts are with you. I'd love to see a bit more in the way of government assistance with these kinds of things, but perhaps there's more to be done in the way of preventative measures. Because these areas of Louisiana and other areas on the gulf coast seem to be serial disasters, sucking up crazy numbers of emergency dollars year after year, and for the same reasons. Rather than allow these things to be dealt with as emergencies time and time again, it might be good to do some other things, like incentivize relocation out of harm's way, improve or create infrastructure aimed at containing or holding back storm water, etc. I'm sure that if we stopped going on all of these middle-eastern crusades, we could afford to do that stuff...

  4. #4

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    just adding my two cents in on the topic of tax payer paid for programs set up by the government, that dont benefit the tax payers.

    We have lovely state parks in NH, I have visited them since forever, I pay for these state parks with my taxes and now more and more im seeing kiosks going up to charge admission to these places. if your going to charge me admission, why tax me for it to begin with? I understand some of these places have a higher upkeep then others, for instance charging a vehicle for ascending a paced road to the top of a mountain, but also charging folks walking up the mountain?

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cottontail View Post
    Very unfortunate. I'm sure I can't imagine how lame this must be, but my thoughts are with you. I'd love to see a bit more in the way of government assistance with these kinds of things, but perhaps there's more to be done in the way of preventative measures. Because these areas of Louisiana and other areas on the gulf coast seem to be serial disasters, sucking up crazy numbers of emergency dollars year after year, and for the same reasons. Rather than allow these things to be dealt with as emergencies time and time again, it might be good to do some other things, like incentivize relocation out of harm's way, improve or create infrastructure aimed at containing or holding back storm water, etc. I'm sure that if we stopped going on all of these middle-eastern crusades, we could afford to do that stuff...
    Beyond the events of hurricane Katrina, being that New Orleans is literally a bowl under sea level in some places, the infrastructure built around the city was supposed to be able to withstand what was thrown at it. It was supposed to be able to hold storm surge from hurricanes. This was put in place by the army corps of engineers. The integrity of the walls around New Orleans wasn't where they said it was. Hurricane Katrina was relatively weak compared to hurricane Rita when they made land fall. It made land fall in Grand Ilse Louisiana as a category 3 hurricane.

    Over fifty breaches in New Orleans's hurricane surge protection are the cause of the majority of the death and destruction during Katrina on August 29, 2005. Eventually 80% of the city and large tracts of neighboring parishes became flooded, and the floodwaters lingered for weeks. According to a modeling exercise conducted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, two-thirds of the deaths in Greater New Orleans were due to levee and floodwall failure. All of the major studies concluded that the USACE, the designers and builders of the levee system as mandated by the Flood Control Act of 1965, is responsible. This is mainly due to a decision to use shorter steel sheet pilings in an effort to save money. In January 2008, Judge Stanwood Duval, U.S. District Court, ruled that despite the Corps' role in the flooding, the agency could not be held financially liable because of sovereign immunity in the Flood Control Act of 1928. Exactly ten years after Katrina, J. David Rogers, lead author of a new report in the official journal of the World Water Council concluded that the flooding during Katrina "could have been prevented had the corps retained an external review board to double-check its flood-wall designs.

    The rains that hit two weeks ago was one of those "once in a thousand years" storm that dropped 25 inches of rain in mostly 2 days. We received over a 1/3 of our yearly average of 60 inches of rain. Places that flooded have NEVER flooded before at this magnitude. These places are above sea level, several miles from the coast. People in my neighborhood say they have lived there for 40 years have said they've never seen this amount of rain nor have they experienced flooding like this. The water in my area receded rather quickly. The water drainage in Lafayette La works really well. It only took about two days after the storm for the water to drain in to the rivers. Imagine a 25 inch sheet of water measuring a 100 mile radius dropping simultaneously, it will take some time for the water to drain.

    Remember when Boston Ma hit a record 108in for snow fall during a year? 10 feet of snow in one year?

    Well Louisiana received the equivalent of 27 feet of snow in 2 days.

    Usually when hurricanes hit, the storm surge is what causes the most damage, usually along the coast. The storm usually weakens quickly and dumps a good amount of rain. While street flooding is common, some trees fall in to people's property, roof damage from the wind, buildings are built to code, to withstand hurricane strength winds.

    What hit Louisiana wasn't a hurricane, it wasn't a tropical storm, it wasn't a tropical depression, it wasn't even considered a tropical disturbance. This was an inland storm that sat stationery for 3 days.

    Before Hurricane Katrina, there was no big storm to hit Louisiana since 1992 (Hurricane Andrew) and it didn't affect Louisiana like this storm did. The last time a storm hit Louisiana and caused significant damage was Hurricane Betsy in 1965 before that it was Hurricane Audrey in 1957.

    To say Louisiana is a magnet for government funds, is absurd. You're saying that any state along the Gulf and Atlantic coasts can be a fund hog. Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Carolinas, Virginia, Maryland, New England and the rest are vulnerable. Any state in tornado alley can suck funds, any state along the Pacific coast that receives wild fires, mudslides, earthquakes can be considered as a magnet for funds.

    Katrina's devastation was the result of failed engineering coupled with the result of coastal erosion and human structuring. If this hurricane hit anywhere else it wouldn't of had the impact that it did have. Yes, New Orleans is probably the only major area in Louisiana that is vulnerable to devastation like this.

  6. #6

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    Louisiana has a long history of political corruption as does the Federal government, though I think the Fed. Gov. suffers more from being massively inefficient than corrupt. Put the two together and nothing gets accomplished. I've often wondered, for all the military spending and equipment, why didn't they send it all in the first day?

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by MommyandMattling View Post
    just adding my two cents in on the topic of tax payer paid for programs set up by the government, that dont benefit the tax payers.

    We have lovely state parks in NH, I have visited them since forever, I pay for these state parks with my taxes and now more and more im seeing kiosks going up to charge admission to these places. if your going to charge me admission, why tax me for it to begin with? I understand some of these places have a higher upkeep then others, for instance charging a vehicle for ascending a paced road to the top of a mountain, but also charging folks walking up the mountain?
    The same goes to having to repurchase our rights such as hunting, fishing, building, driving, diving, animal breeding, marriage, and many more.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by MeTaLMaNN1983 View Post
    The same goes to having to repurchase our rights such as hunting, fishing, building, driving, diving, animal breeding, marriage, and many more.
    In these case you are not purchasing rights. Hunting, fishing, building, driving, diving, and husbandry are not rights. They're regulated activities you choose to participate in. Marriage may be a right, but you're not buying a right. You're perfectly free to go to your local church and marry whomever you want. You pay for the government to certify that relationship as eligible for financial and social benefits.

    - - - Updated - - -



    Quote Originally Posted by MommyandMattling View Post
    We have lovely state parks in NH, I have visited them since forever, I pay for these state parks with my taxes and now more and more im seeing kiosks going up to charge admission to these places. if your going to charge me admission, why tax me for it to begin with? I understand some of these places have a higher upkeep then others, for instance charging a vehicle for ascending a paced road to the top of a mountain, but also charging folks walking up the mountain?
    I like the way my state park (nice one, too!) does it. Entry fee per car, no fee on foot. In a residential area so it's not as if Joe Schmoe's going to set up a $1 sandlot across the street for parking.

    If you want to go a step further, you don't pay for state parks. Studies show very consistently that investing in parks comes with a significant ROI for the state itself and the government. How consistently? I'm not even bothering to provide a link because the sources are numerous and readily accessible. Look, I'll be the first to criticize the actions of people in the government- FEMA turned out to be pretty ineffective when some guy appointed a horse lawyer to run it.

    Frankly, if you'd like government to be effective, your first step should be to never vote for a candidate who affiliates with a party that believes on a fundamental level that government cannot be effective. Would you hire a fat fetishist or a personal trainer to be President of Gold's Gym?

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