Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Questions On "All in One" Diapers

  1. #1

    Default Questions On "All in One" Diapers

    Hello, I've been debating on buying a few diapers online and the "all in one" diapers keep catching my eye but I know very little information on them so some help would be great!

    • Are "all in one" diapers really worth the money and the hassle? How absorbent, soft, cute are they compared to AB/DL OR other cloth diapers or disposable diapers?
    • Should you wear plastic pants over top of them like normal cloth diapers?
    • Are they able to hold side wettings? (Since I sleep on my side.)


    Thank you for taking your time to read and answer my questions!
    -FMH

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	c3a7f800b6111f2cc3fdac1dd5f1b9b0.jpg 
Views:	82 
Size:	17.5 KB 
ID:	27070

  2. #2

    Default

    I'm not a frequent cloth user but my experiences with all in ones weren't very encouraging. They take a longer time to dry than regular cloth diapers and while plastic pants aren't absolutely required, their tendency to leak makes them a prudent addition. I also didn't really like the feel of the protective layer but that's obviously a very individual matter.

  3. #3

    Default

    I haven't had a good experience with AIO's either. The one I got was fully advertised as an AIO but would leak liquid like mad if you were lying down. No barrier between the padding and the edge of the diaper.
    If I could find one that wouldn't leak without the addition of plastic pants, I'd be for them to give them a try. But until then I'll only use cloth diapers as a fashion-ish thing for my little time, not actually using them.

  4. #4

    Default

    I have several AIOs from Dependeco and have been very pleased with them. However, if you are a very heavy wetter suggest you add a booster pad. If I am going to wear one away from home I wear a plastic panty as a backup in case I flood the diaper and the pad.

  5. #5

    Default

    I've got one from dependeco, and it is extremely soft and absorbent and the lady that runs it is very nice and wonderful to talk to. The only issue is that it does leak a bit but some plastic pants fixed it right up. Definitely recommend

    Sent from my SM-G900P using Tapatalk

  6. #6

    Default

    In my limited experience anything with cloth is much better with side wetting.

    I tried all in ones - but the velcro came away from the rest of it really quickly.
    It could have been a poor make of all-in-ones though.

  7. #7

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by FightMeHelen View Post
    Hello, I've been debating on buying a few diapers online and the "all in one" diapers keep catching my eye but I know very little information on them so some help would be great!
    [*]Are "all in one" diapers really worth the money and the hassle? How absorbent, soft, cute are they compared to AB/DL OR other cloth diapers or disposable diapers?

    Yes they are worth the money and the hassle of cleaning them as well. They can serve as a novelty item, they are thicker than conventional disposables, they do have very many cute designs to choose from and are very soft. They are absorbent (the act of sucking in moisture) at a good rate, but capacity is rather low. All of the AIO products out there are generally the same comparing capacity. You can add extra padding into them. Generally, disposables have much higher capacities than cloth diapers all together. If you want more capacity, increase the amount of layers.

    [*]Should you wear plastic pants over top of them like normal cloth diapers?

    Typically AIOs are comparable in capacity to a Depend or store brand diaper, maybe less. It would be a good idea to wear plastic pants. They have the tendency to leak under pressure just like disposables.

    [*]Are they able to hold side wettings? (Since I sleep on my side.)


    This would be a definite no. These are made to mimic disposables in ease of use and generally have no padding in the wings.

    If you want function, especially at night, you'd be better off with classic prefolds. They are easily more customizable, and more convenient to clean. AIOs are difficult to completely clean and eventually will reek of odors. Waterproof barriers are usually the worst part of AIO diapers as they breakdown long before the padding does. It's also very difficult to rinse through. The padding is sewn to the barrier therefore you can't clean all the way through without a lot of soaking and wringing out, and probably will never be 100% clean. You can't bleach it because it deteriorates the padding and barrier.

    Prefold diapers paired with plastic pants is the best way to go functionally. Printed plastic pants and prefold diapers are available for looks. Pin alternatives are out there that make prefolds almost as easy as AIOs. You can customize the thickness by adding in toddler prefolds. The crotch is wider and provides more coverage. You can customize the fit and make them fit lower or higher as needed by making small adjustment folds or rolls. Plastic pants come in many different fits and sizes such as higher waist, lower waist, bikini fit, type of material, and ect.


    The wider array of designs and prints of AIOs are probably the most attractive part about them along with ease of applying. They are a decent daytime diaper but are not good for night time

  8. #8

    Default

    What i found is they do not wash as good as cloth diapers.
    And they take a long time to dry.

    I wish someone would make them without the water proof outer shell.
    They would dry a lot quicker and you would just wear them with plastic pants.

  9. #9

    Default

    No pun intended, but in answer to your question, "It Depends!"

    I have a couple of really great all in one diapers that perform at the level of Abena, Dry 24/7, or even better. It is all about in how they are constructed and also how often they are washed. Yes, how often they are washed. Cloth is much different than disposables, in that in order to get better absorbancy, the more use they have, they actually tend to absorb better.

    Having said this, I admit you should still plan on wearing plastic pants, just in case. The best disposables have a plastic covering that is waterproof (except for leakage around the sides) and cloth all in ones still need to have some sort of waterproof covering for the heavy wetter.

    The problem I see with all in ones, or cloth diapers in general, is they have a greater bulk than most disposables. While this can be fun, if you are trying not to be noticed, it is a detriment. But, if you are not needing to be discrete, then cloth is in many ways superior to disposables. Not only can you reuse them, but I have found my "Cars Print" all in one to be more absorbent than any disposable I have tried, and I have tried a lot! In addition, I was raised in both cloth and disposables as a biological baby, so cloth diapers have a bit of a mental imprint as well in bringing me to who I truly was (and am) as a baby.

    It is worth the cost of giving all in ones a try. If you decide they are not for you, well, you still have gained the experience and you are better able to decide how to pad yourself in the future.

  10. #10

    Default

    I only tried one from Kins and it was a Velcro version. They also make a pull-up version. As a side sleeper they did leak. Drying them after washing was a pain also. I now like to stick to contour diapers with liners. They wash and dry better and I can adjust the thickness I need with layers. Plastic pants are a must anyways.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 10
    Last Post: 21-Jan-2014, 03:58
  2. Replies: 30
    Last Post: 04-Aug-2013, 20:23
  3. "Senator questions benefits to 'adult babies'."
    By Persondude in forum Mature Topics
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 22-Jul-2011, 15:42

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
ADISC.org - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community.
ADISC.org is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.