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Thread: When you discover as a guy you can actually like the color pink

  1. #1

    Default When you discover as a guy you can actually like the color pink

    So it only recently occurred to me a few months ago how genderized (if that's even a word lol) everything is when you're a child and how ingrained it still is even as adults. Heck, check out my profile pic the boys nappies are of course blue and the girls nappies are...pink who would've guessed? Already before I can even talk I am told that girls are to like pink and boys are to like blue. And they further label this by colorizing toys packaging accordingly pink for girls and any other color (usually blue) for boys toys. For just one example in Australia the Lego is branded like this, not to mention many other companies doing the same thing. I work in retail and its so bloody obvious to me now, just walk down the dolls isle and you'll see it.
    Anyway moving on it dawned on me that I have for my entire life deliberately avoided anything that's pink or girly!? It must be some unconscious effort of myself because whether it be for buying a car, clothing or even a computer mouse, pink is out of the question. Now hang on, I thought to myself. Pink might actually be my favorite color! How would I know if I never got a chance to even attempt liking the color? It makes me angry that I got robbed of liking a particular color because of society.
    So one day I decided to go buy a nice girly Frozen poster for my bedroom wall and you know what? One of my sisters walks into my room sees it and starts falling to the ground laughing. She's older than btw and to which she still owes me an apology for that thank you very much. It just makes it clear how ingrained this kind of thinking is. That boys can't and shouldn't like "girl" things. Well, you know what? Upon discovery of this new "girly" world I actually kind of like it.. a lot. I like the color pink now and it's definitely in my top 3 favorite colors. It's unfortunate many boys (including myself) grow up with this kind of thinking, unable to find what they truly like without fear of bullying or embarrassment.
    Sorry for the wall of text just had to let this out.

    Tl;DR Society forces boys not to like a particular color (pink) and inadvertently causes bullying towards any boys that oppose that view.

  2. #2

    Default

    I try to bring my kids up to ignore these stereotypes, but it is amazing how powerful peer pressure is.

  3. #3

    Default

    Exactly. It affected me pretty badly looking back. In primary school when we had to write short stories I was so afraid of writing about anything "girly" that I would deliberately not even include the word "girl" at all let alone girl characters out of fear of being teased even though I wanted to. This kind of attitude lasted well into high school too and still avoided using female characters when writing. It's bloody ridiculous.

  4. #4

    Default

    Ironically, a few hundred years ago, pink and red were associated with boys, and blue with girls. The explanation has been that many boys would have to serve in the army for the King, so pink and red were associated with the blood they would spill. I wish I could wear some clothes that were a little feminine, but I have to live in this world as an employed musician, so I'm careful as to what I do in public.

  5. #5

    Default

    I have heard of several attempts recently to try to over-come this bias by various companies and organizations (sorry, I cannot think of the names at the moment) by trying more neutral color choices or marketing in a non-gender way.

    I hope this continues but biases tend to take a long...long time to be over-come even with good intentions.

  6. #6

    Default

    I always kinda thought that gender stereotypes were BS. One can be a guy and like pink and girly stuff, just like one can be a girl and like transformers, and visa-virsa. because that is what they are, stereotypes. Sadly other people don't think that fully yet. I do pray for you Huggiesguy, and hope you can find your own peace with this, because sadly all of us do have to live in this crazy world.

  7. #7

    Default

    Well here is an interesting fact.
    From about the mid 1800's to early 1900's Pink and Blue were for Girls & Boys.
    From the early 1900's to about the late 30's/ early 40's Pink was for Boys and Blue was for Girls.

    Ladies' Home Journal article in June 1918 said:
    "The generally accepted rule is pink for the boys, and blue for the girls.
    The reason is that pink, being a more decided and stronger color, is more suitable for the boy,
    while blue, which is more delicate and dainty, is prettier for the girl."
    YES! Boys wore Pink and Girls wore Blue.
    But some one, some where decided that Nuuu Nuuu that just isn't right and it got switched to Pink = Girls, Blue = Boys.

  8. #8

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by MandyBear View Post
    Well here is an interesting fact.
    From about the mid 1800's to early 1900's Pink and Blue were for Girls & Boys.
    From the early 1900's to about the late 30's/ early 40's Pink was for Boys and Blue was for Girls.

    Ladies' Home Journal article in June 1918 said:
    "The generally accepted rule is pink for the boys, and blue for the girls.
    The reason is that pink, being a more decided and stronger color, is more suitable for the boy,
    while blue, which is more delicate and dainty, is prettier for the girl."
    YES! Boys wore Pink and Girls wore Blue.
    But some one, some where decided that Nuuu Nuuu that just isn't right and it got switched to Pink = Girls, Blue = Boys.
    That's very interesting it turns out it's because of manufacturers of clothes who just happened to see it differently and so it got switched. I found an article which talked about the photo of "little Franklin Delano Roosevelt" who like all little boys in 1884 wore a dress. Just search the name and see yourself. The article states that the "social convention of 1884, when FDR was photographed at age 2 1/2, dictated that boys wore dresses until age 6 or 7".
    Last edited by SweetPrincess; 05-Jun-2016 at 12:50.

  9. #9

    Default

    I have always had a fondness for dresses, dolls, baking and sewing. My mother would often make dresses and skirts for my sister. I asked one day if she would make me something. So she assumed my something meant pants. Pants were harder to make she explained. Could not bring myself to say I wanted a dress. I have always thought pink was a rather nice color. Naturally I would never wear anything pink when growing up. Until tenth grade I was on the small side. Small and wearing pink back then was not a good choice. Things changed when I finally grew. I did get a pink shirt and I did wear it, but not often. Today I have quite a few outfits with pink and now wish that I had remained shorter.
    It was indeed common, at least among the upper class, that young boys wore dresses and had long hair. There is a painting of the Rough Rider, Teddy Roosevelt, hanging in his home on Long Island. If memory serves me correctly, he had long curly hair and wore a lovely dress. I heard somewhere that they were refereed to as boy dresses. Do not think a boy dress looked different than a girl dress. I guess that made it socially acceptable for little boys to wear a dress as it was a boy dress.

  10. #10
    MarchinBunny

    Default

    The story I heard was that because Hitler put pink triangles on gays, they stopped associating pink with boys.

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