Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Reality of Infantilism...From an Autistic Perspective...#3

  1. #1

    Default Reality of Infantilism...From an Autistic Perspective...#3

    I apologize for not being the most prolific of posters/communicators here in this Infantilism Forum.
    With respect to being an "Adult Baby", I have been an AB/DL for decades.
    I pretty-much stay by myself and I try not to bother anyone or cause any uproars.
    My AB/DL life is a rather solitary and lonely one.
    I only know of one other AB/DL in my area face-to-face.
    It has been a while since we were together.
    Like me, he is also autistic.
    I admit to loneliness.
    But, here where I live in my family home, I can not entertain other AB/DL's.
    The rule, per my younger non-disabled brother's instructions is that only Autistic and Cerebral Palsy disability community may come and visit.
    In reality, I have not many "baby toys" to play with.
    My "Adult Baby Space" is only my bedroom here at home.
    Well, I will admit that via the Internet I do know of many other Autistic AB/DL Adults.
    I suppose that it is some consolation with respect to my lonely solitary life.


  2. #2

    Default

    So if your friends aren't autistc or have CP you aren't allowed to have them over? That hardly seems fair.

  3. #3

    Default

    Or normal, I'm sure. Trouble is, normals don't speak Autie, and most don't understand CP.

  4. #4

    Default

    If one doesn't have "normal" friends that's fine, but only being allowed to socialize within your own minority doesn't seem fair to me.

  5. #5

    Default

    Oh, it's not okay to say he can't have normal friends, and Caitainx, don't let me speak for you, bro. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm sure if Caitainx could speak Normalese, thus making it easier to have alistic, (non autistic), or otherwise non disabled friends, that'd be fine with his very ablist (used similarly to racist or sexist, for example) brother. I don't think Caitainx has any normal friends. Pretty sure he just meant his ablist brother is very age-conformist, too.

    I had the exact opposite problem growing up. Opposite from, "keep to your own kind." None of my friends could come over in elementary school because I lived with my ablist aunt. Wasn't all bad; she let Sis and mom and walkie brother and sisters come by, once. Wasn't until middle school I was socially capable of hanging out with non disabled kids. Didn't want them as friends, because having friends you can't connect with is pointless. In middle school, my adoptive sister came to visit at me my at my evil step-grandma's house, once, and understandably never came to visit again.

    I started hanging out with Mom and Sis a lot, because even if one of my sister's friends was in a wheelchair, like we are, they could still come visit. My mouth dropped open and I probably looked astonished when I found that out.
    Last edited by SpAzpieSweeTot; 06-Apr-2016 at 21:31.

  6. #6

    Default

    You're not alone, I'm Autist Asperger, and I know a bunch of AB/DL on the forums here are also. Some don't even know they are but if they researched it a little bit, they would find they are at least partly.

  7. #7

    Default


    Humm. Please can someone define "Normal."
    Conforming to a standard; usual, typical, or expected.
    The trubel be who set this as a standard, and who say that they are right.

    As a society we have to adapt to every walk of life, having a disability is not fun. And having a disability and being forced into a round home when you are a Square Peg becouse you have this "Label." Is just stupid.

    I spend a lot of time at work a lot of my I'm trying to push the what people see as "The norm!" I would say that most people with a disability, actually enabled, as they will have unique gifts that most "normal" people may not have.

    Last night I enjoyed speaking with people with autism as I find them to be extremely intelligent people. It's just that they see the world look different, that other people. And I do like that.


  8. #8

    Default

    Sisi, just so you know, identity-first language, sweetie. Autism spectrum disorder isn't cancer, or a cold, or the flu, so because we're not sick, "with autism," there's nothing wrong with saying, "Autistic people."

    "People with autism," is kinda like, "partially sighted," Able people like person-first language, because it hides the disablity from some able people, and that makes those able people feel better. Meanwhile, many blind and partially blind people are sitting there going, "You got a problem with blind people?! Then what's wrong with saying blind or partially blind?!"

    Many deaf people feel the same about their deafness, to the point that they distinguish between "deaf," meaning the condition, and, "Deaf," culturally Deaf.

    Funny how able people also call adult diapers, "briefs," and say it preserves dignity, when all it does is confuse people looking to buy adult pull-ups.

    I always use normal in a sarcastic way, because parts of being disabled aren't fun, like parts of being AB/Little aren't fun, for example, nappy rash, but in other ways we know, rather disability, AB/Littleness, or both, makes us, "abnormal," we have more fun than normal people. Don't we? Normal people wannabe better? Fine, but we can laugh at them for it, and feel more evolved for it, just like they can.

    Isn't abnormal a fun word? ABnormal
    Last edited by SpAzpieSweeTot; 06-Apr-2016 at 21:11.

  9. #9

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by SpAzpieSweeTot View Post
    Sisi, just so you know, identity-first language, sweetie. Autism spectrum disorder isn't cancer, or a cold, or the flu, so because we're not sick, "with autism," there's nothing wrong with saying, "Autistic people."

    "People with autism," is kinda like, "partially sighted," Able people like person-first language, because it hides the disablity from some able people, and that makes those able people feel better. Meanwhile, many blind and partially blind people are sitting there going, "You got a problem with blind people?! Then what's wrong with saying blind or partially blind?!"

    Many deaf people feel the same about their deafness, to the point that they distinguish between "deaf," meaning the condition, and, "Deaf," culturally Deaf.

    Funny how able people also call adult diapers, "briefs," and say it preserves dignity, when all it does is confuse people looking to buy adult pull-ups.

    I always use normal in a sarcastic way, because parts of being disabled aren't fun, like parts of being AB/Little aren't fun, for example, nappy rash, but in other ways we know, rather disability, AB/Littleness, or both, makes us, "abnormal," we have more fun than normal people. Don't we? Normal people wannabe better? Fine, but we can laugh at them for it, and feel more evolved for it, just like they can.

    Isn't abnormal a fun word? ABnormal

    Hi SpAzpieSweeTot

    Hummm.

    Really sorry if I caused offence.

    I do understand that Autism is not an illness.

    And I have read through what I have written and I'm not sure where you thought I was thinking that this is something that you could take a pill for.

    What I was saying is that the most autistic people have more intelligent that some people.

    And it is wrong for someone to put people in a box because they have a label.

    I work with autistic people, and support them in the day to day lives. And they have challenged me about my "toderism". Yes that is a word I just made it up.

    Have a look at "should Little drive." where someone challenged me about being A Little. And I still think he has a point in what he was saying.

    identity-first language, I never come across this term. So it as giving me something to google. Thanks

    The way I was putting thing is probably something I picked up from when I was going the school.
    I was sent to school for people with special needs. Well the got the special bit right. Not sure who had the needs though, us or the teachers. Hee, hee.

    Being put in a class that other children with dyslexia and other interesting behaviour patterns was kind off .... humm I have to think of another new word. Still did not learn to spell or to read. But I did learn to observe people's behaviour patterns and body language.

    Sorry if I have got it all wrong way round again . And as I have said before it's the naughtyness inside that tastes so good.

    Sisi



  10. #10

    Default



    Quote Originally Posted by sisi View Post

    Hi SpAzpieSweeTot

    Hummm.

    Really sorry if I caused offence.

    I do understand that Autism is not an illness.

    And I have read through what I have written and I'm not sure where you thought I was thinking that this is something that you could take a pill for.

    What I was saying is that the most autistic people have more intelligent that some people.

    And it is wrong for someone to put people in a box because they have a label.

    I work with autistic people, and support them in the day to day lives. And they have challenged me about my "toderism". Yes that is a word I just made it up.

    Have a look at "should Little drive." where someone challenged me about being A Little. And I still think he has a point in what he was saying.

    identity-first language, I never come across this term. So it as giving me something to google. Thanks

    The way I was putting thing is probably something I picked up from when I was going the school.
    I was sent to school for people with special needs. Well the got the special bit right. Not sure who had the needs though, us or the teachers. Hee, hee.

    Being put in a class that other children with dyslexia and other interesting behaviour patterns was kind off .... humm I have to think of another new word. Still did not learn to spell or to read. But I did learn to observe people's behaviour patterns and body language.

    Sorry if I have got it all wrong way round again . And as I have said before it's the naughtyness inside that tastes so good.

    Sisi



    No naughtiness or offense taken, sweetie. I wanted you to know I think of normal the way you do. Normal is something to joke about, because what is it, even? I'm with you on the, "Who the heck decided," feeling. I know you're for us and not against us, and that feels so nice inside. Normal can officially kiss our bums, right? Everyone has something not normal. That being the case, I don't think anyone should shy away from certain abnormalities because people who don't have those panticular ones, blindness, deafness, autism, whatever, are uncomfortable with the fact that some people are blind, deaf, Autie, or whatever, so they change the wording to make it sound less sad.

    I know that's not how you think, and I appreciate it. You and I both know that disabled life isn't anymore in need of pity than non-disabled life. Life is just hard and sad for everyone, sometimes.



Similar Threads

  1. I need some perspective.
    By kashi in forum Mature Topics
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 29-Jan-2014, 14:06
  2. "Being a LIttle", from an autistic perspective...
    By caitianx in forum Adult Babies & Littles
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 20-Jan-2014, 18:11
  3. Being a "Little" from an Autistic Perspective...#2
    By caitianx in forum Adult Babies & Littles
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 14-Jan-2014, 21:10
  4. Your perspective on AB/DL
    By LanceAqua in forum Adult Babies & Littles
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 09-Sep-2010, 23:39
  5. A non furs perspective
    By Secret in forum Babyfur / Diaperfur
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 06-Dec-2008, 06:45

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
ADISC.org - the Adult Baby / Diaper Lover / Incontinence Support Community.
ADISC.org is designed to be viewed in Firefox, with a resolution of at least 1280 x 1024.