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ilostthesheriff

Litterbugs: My quickest insight into a persons moral structure.

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Littering,

My biggest pet-peave. It happens everyday, almost everywhere. The act of unregarded spillage. Perhaps the most preventable act of human-kind, yet it is performed by unwary and lazy people everywhere. The simple mechanics of tossing garbage anywhere other than a designed receptacle.

I sit waiting for a light at an intersection and gaze to the median next to the car and notice all of the trash that has been so carelessly tossed out of a window recently. The gravel lay second-nature underneath all of the cigarrete butts, candy wrappers, empty cups and straws, bottle caps, Chapstick casings, crumpled Post-It's, and other garbage. It leaves me wondering who these culprits are......

My absolute disdain with such litterbugs goes back a long way. Into my yourth. Sitting here I cannot recollect where the obsession derived from but I do know that this littering trait in people has given me valuable insight into what kind of moral structure a person is built on. Trashing your surroundings reflects on your perception of where you live as well as how you set your priorities. It gives me insight as to how careless you are or how inconsiderate you are. These traits are carried out in-order into the rest of your persona both in the way that you view your own values and ultimately the way that you will treat others in the future. It's an easy look into the value-system of a person.

This inept trait is also observed in much the same way as how a person treats a waiter or waitress at a restaurant. If you are on a first date and your partner treats a wait-staff as garbage then it is likely they will treat you the same. It's a simple matter of perspective into the under-lying tendencies of and individual. Such simple ques give light into how a person thinks and how they tend to treat those in their company. This value-system is transparent. It bleeds into every other aspect of the persona.

Misery loves company.

It iis my personal belief that those who cannot respect themselves have little room left to respect others or the world around them. Red flags abound.

I have no place or compassion for litterbugs.
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Comments

  1. gigglemuffinz's Avatar
    Honestly, I do get where you are coming from. It's easy to put those points together, and come to the conclusion you did.

    But I just don't honestly believe people should be looked at that way myself. People are flawed, naturally wired to think of themselves first. We try our darn hardest, and a person could just be ignorant of really how much effect their littering will have or a ton of other special circumstances could be at play. As a flawed human I try not to judge others, as if I'm above them in some way. If we are all sinners or going to make a ton of mistakes.. we can afford to treat others with compassion and forgiveness as long as we recognize that what we've done is a mistake and work to correct it. That's how I feel.

    Really interesting thoughts though, really could have been a topic even! You're a smart person. ^_^
  2. ilostthesheriff's Avatar
    gigglemuffinz: Thank you for your response. Your insight is highly valued.

    In response: Flaws are one thing. Blatant disregard is another. Your sentiment that all humans are flawed is correct but these type of traits fall into the realm of conscious disregard. These are choices that are repeated over and over. It's one thing to be raised in a society defunct of such moral apparition and it's another to know better. I find it ultimately hard to believe that an individual raised in a civilized country is ignorant of simple consideration.

    Not every ticket is a free-ride to claiming ingorance.
  3. Cottontail's Avatar
    I sympathize with your point of view, ilostthesheriff, though I tend to associate the litter problem with consumer culture in general. Firstly, for a large slice of America, the world has become something you just get from or take from; there's no sense of obligation to provide for anything or anybody else. This sort of one-way relationship with the things around them doubtless makes it easy to not care about tossing garbage out of one's car window.

    Secondly, there's just a lot of garbage to be tossed out of one's car window, a reflection of the same disregard on the part of corporate America. Nearly everything you buy comes bundled with a huge amount of stuff for which the buyer has no use -- notably the packaging, but often the entire product is single-use. It makes me angry when I walk store isles and see cases of yogurts in tiny plastic containers, all of which will become garbage within minutes of being opened.

    We have become a culture of consumption and waste, and so while "litterbugs" may represent a very small percentage of the total population, there's enough potential litter in their lives for it to be a very visible problem to the rest of us. And the problem runs deeper, of course; litter is the tip of the iceberg. Our landfills are overflowing with garbage that simply shouldn't be created in the first place.

    Despite being generally more conservative in my political views, I think it's hard not to see that capitalism's evolutionary functions have no connection to the health of our environment whatsoever. In this instance, I'm inclined to suggest we begin solving the problem upstream of the litterbugs, by stringent regulation of packaging, particularly for food. Landfills and just about everywhere else is filling up with this stuff, and it's just a disgusting display of disregard for the environment by everybody involved in its production, consumption, and disposal.

    Nip the problem in the bud -- sort of. It's hard to teach people to care. It's not all that hard to take away some parts of their freedom to express their non-caring. We do what we can.
  4. Lilicup's Avatar
    I don't like littering either :/

    I was raised not to litter. At my house we were never allowed to throw trash on the ground, and I was never EVER allowed to throw anything out of the window.

    Everytime I see someone litter now it just feels wrong..... like, it feels unnatural

    trash = trash bag
  5. ilostthesheriff's Avatar


    Quote Originally Posted by Cottontail
    I sympathize with your point of view, ilostthesheriff, though I tend to associate the litter problem with consumer culture in general. Firstly, for a large slice of America, the world has become something you just get from or take from; there's no sense of obligation to provide for anything or anybody else. This sort of one-way relationship with the things around them doubtless makes it easy to not care about tossing garbage out of one's car window.

    Secondly, there's just a lot of garbage to be tossed out of one's car window, a reflection of the same disregard on the part of corporate America. Nearly everything you buy comes bundled with a huge amount of stuff for which the buyer has no use -- notably the packaging, but often the entire product is single-use. It makes me angry when I walk store isles and see cases of yogurts in tiny plastic containers, all of which will become garbage within minutes of being opened.

    We have become a culture of consumption and waste, and so while "litterbugs" may represent a very small percentage of the total population, there's enough potential litter in their lives for it to be a very visible problem to the rest of us. And the problem runs deeper, of course; litter is the tip of the iceberg. Our landfills are overflowing with garbage that simply shouldn't be created in the first place.

    Despite being generally more conservative in my political views, I think it's hard not to see that capitalism's evolutionary functions have no connection to the health of our environment whatsoever. In this instance, I'm inclined to suggest we begin solving the problem upstream of the litterbugs, by stringent regulation of packaging, particularly for food. Landfills and just about everywhere else is filling up with this stuff, and it's just a disgusting display of disregard for the environment by everybody involved in its production, consumption, and disposal.

    Nip the problem in the bud -- sort of. It's hard to teach people to care. It's not all that hard to take away some parts of their freedom to express their non-caring. We do what we can.

    You raise some good points.

    The idea about solving the problem 'upstream' of the litterbug. Consumer shelf packaging can certainly be addressed. The vast amount of packaging for single-use has become the norm. Extraordinary amounts of plastics and paper product are wasted in the name of convenience.

    "Sigh". If only everyone was a concerned as a few.
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