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KatieBear

Lucky

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Sometimes I think I am lucky, being a female AB. I can get away with things that guys my age wouldn't.

For instance, I'm currently wearing a footed sleeper, hot pink with yellow duckies. It has a drop seat. Quite frankly, it's adorable. Stick a pacifier in my mouth and I'm a picture perfect example of a cute AB girl.

I can also walk around the house in this sleeper and no one thinks it's odd. My mom even tried to convince me to order one for her.

My family looks at it and sees a cute, but practical purpose for the cold winter months, and since it's currently four degrees out, that interpretation makes sense. I don't think most boys could get away with it, though.

I'm lucky in other ways, too -- my very first diaper arrived in the mail today and I have the day off work tomorrow because of the cold. I'll be padding up for the first time in about two decades tonight and I can't wait. I'll wait until the family goes to bed, of course, and my bedroom door will be locked, but if I get caught, they'll be easy to explain away.

My mom has some bladder problems -- a tiny one for her age and sometimes she doesn't realize she has to go until moments before it happens. It's well-known in our family and no one blinks twice if she has an "accident." They happen about once every three months or so, so it's not a rare event.

I've apparently inherited her problems because within the last few years, my bladder capacity has shrunk. I used to be able to sleep an entire night without going to the bathroom, but now I have to get up three or four times a night (so let's hope this diaper is up to its task, ha). And the time I have before an accident is getting less and less, too. If I last another five years without having an accident, I will be surprised.

So if my family does happen to see my diapers, I already have my excuse at the ready. A medical need that I don't yet have but am quickly developing; it's not a stretch to imply that it's already developed.

And they will believe me.

Just about the only thing I can't explain away is my bottle. Even my pacifiers can be explained -- I grind my teeth and snore, both of which pacifiers have been shown to help with.

I prefer to keep my AB side a secret, but if word gets out...well, it's not the end of the world. I'm lucky that way.
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Comments

  1. LittleHanah's Avatar
    I knoww! Being an AB girl has its perks :] I love being an AB girl, I wear footies and nobody says anything either, and I wear my hair in pigtails too <3 its fun Im still young so nobody really sees it as strange, and another great thing, we don't have to worry about shaving off facial hair to look more baby, and our voices are already squeaky heehee, at least mine is <3
  2. kerry's Avatar
    Well, as a 56-year-old female AB, I will say it is a bit harder as you get older. I remember being able to dress up and have fun when I was in my early 20's, but now, though I have cause (I am incontinent and my family knows that), it's a bit hard to parade around in babyish clothing with my grown kids likely to wander through the house at any time. Oh I do it--my pink footie sleeper with elephants and ABC's--but only when I can be reasonably sure they won't be here. (My husband is fine with it.) The kids have all seen my plushies--heck, my oldest gave me most of them--but the pacis and footies I keep to myself for now...mostly because I don't have a footie with a pattern that is not obviously babyish. I'm working on that.
  3. neocarbunkle's Avatar
    I am most definitely jealous. I think there are lot of things that girl ABs could do that most people on the street wouldn't even think twice about.

    And some heavy duty feminine pads are essentially light diapers.
  4. caitianx's Avatar
    For me, being seen with a diaper in my hand while hobbling on my forearm crutches is not seen as unusual, since others can look down and see my leg braces. I have Cerebral Palsy (and Autism).
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