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Tales of a Forgotten God

Expanding your cubicle of thought...

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A key part of being a writer is knowing how to accent a piece of written work with small details that add to the experience -- that, at least, is my philosophy. When creating your own little universe, you need to keep in mind every detail, even the smallest of them, that the reader may want to know instead of leaving them to assume it's how they normally perceive it.

I've done this with the concept of time in my own story.

As promised in...I believe yesterday's blog, I have a little something for you that I'm sure you'll have fun seeing, and please point out any flaws in it that you see, be they logic or grammar, and I'll do my best to fix it.

Enjoy:

[quote]I had read somewhere before that the twenty-four hour system was somewhat of a standard all throughout the multiverse, even in alternate dimensions existing closely to the knit fabric of reality. Thanks to the influence of [i]multiple[/i] planets, the standard was spread to every corner of space, and itís unlikely that there are [i]any[/i] orbiting bodies remaining that donít at least use it occasionally. While it was theorized to be put into practice by the Greek civilization on Earth, the idea was mutual throughout many galaxies, though the influence of Earth [i]did[/i] have some effects on alien species observing the planetís practices. Something worth mentioning, however, is that the traditional time system has been adjusted for use on several planets in order to fit the amount of time required for the planet to rotate completely on its axis; for a single day to pass, in other words. Enia, by mere coincidence and chance, retained the original system of twenty-four hours. However, the distance between the planet itself and the star it rotates around is enough insomuch that a total ofÖI believe it was four weeks and five days have been added to the normal, twelve-month calendar, giving Enia a total of thirteen months on its own charts Ė an interesting tidbit in relation to this is that, because of the spreading of Earthen knowledge and customs yet again, the names for the months and seasons on Enia are parallel to Earthís (I regret to say I donít clearly remember the name of the thirteenth month, though).[/quote]
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  1. Dawes's Avatar
    I don't venture to point out any flaws in it, as honestly, that's not my place, and I don't see any! And even if there were, the flaws would be appreciated -- developing a world around a whole new system of time and science is a difficult thing, and a very involved one! I believe it's things like this that really set fantasy writers in their own art -- one must consciously be able to create, command, and make logical the laws by which that world abides, and never break them. Many writers learn the rules of their world from birth, but a fantasy writer has the ability, if they're willing to undertake the challenge, to toss that all about!

    One of my favorite parts of fantasy writing is to take familiarities that every reader will recognize and twist them. This is much of the reason why I'm enjoying the Emperor series so much -- not only does the author focus on the historical aspects of Julius Caeser's life, but he's also introducing magic and fantasy intrigue into a real-life setting.

    Great job on your time explanation and the time you took delving into it, Cen! I'm excited to see it in action in the story!
  2. Cen Aeonis's Avatar
    That's the thing I love about fantasy: it can be logical, but it doesn't strictly have to be. :3 I'm actually very glad I decided to type out this small segment for my work, as I feel it will inevitably help build the feel for my created story universe as time progresses.

    And thank you, Rance, for your kind words, once again.
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